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China’s Didi asked to delist from U.S., SoftBank shares fall: Report

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A navigation map on the app of Chinese ride-hailing giant Didi is seen on a mobile phone in front of the app logo displayed in this illustration picture taken July 1, 2021.

Florence Lo | Reuters

GUANGZHOU, China — Shares of SoftBank extended their losses on Friday after Bloomberg reported that Chinese regulators have asked Didi’s executives to formulate a plan to delist from the U.S.

SoftBank shares in Japan were down 4.77% at the lunch break. SoftBank’s Vision Fund owned more than 20% of Didi following its U.S. listing.

Bloomberg’s report said regulators want Chinese ride-hailing giant Didi to delist from the New York Stock Exchange because of concerns about leakage of sensitive data. The news agency cited people familiar with the matter who asked not to be identified due to the sensitivity of the matter.

The Cyberspace Administration of China has asked Didi to work out the details for a delisting which will be subject to government approval, the report said.

Didi could either go for a privatization or a listing in Hong Kong after delisting in the U.S, the report said.

A privatization would be at the $14 per share IPO price when the company listed, while a Hong Kong float would likely be at a discount to what Didi’s shares were trading at in the U.S., according to Bloomberg.

Didi declined to comment on the report.

A state-directed delisting would be an unprecedented move but highlights Beijing’s continued push to reign in technology giants and put them under tighter regulation. Didi in particular is a special case. Shortly after its IPO in the U.S. in June, regulators opened a cybersecurity review into the company.

Didi reportedly drew the ire of regulators by pushing ahead with an IPO without resolving outstanding cybersecurity issues that the authorities wanted solved. Didi is China’s largest ride-hailing app and holds lots of data on travel routes and users.

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Stock futures fall amid fears of new Covid variant found in South Africa

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A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) November 8, 2021.

Brendan McDermid | Reuters

U.S. stock futures dropped in overnight trading on Thursday as investors geared up for a shortened trading day amid renewed Covid fears over a new variant found in South Africa.

Futures for the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell more than 400 points, while those for the S&P 500 and the Nasdaq 100 were both in negative territory.

The downward move in futures came after WHO officials on Thursday warned of a new Covid-19 variant that’s been detected in South Africa. The United Kingdom temporarily suspended flights from six African countries due to the variant.

Markets were closed on Thursday for Thanksgiving, so stocks are coming off of slight gains on Wednesday that staunched the week’s losses for the S&P 500 and Nasdaq Composite.

Treasury yields have climbed this week, putting pressure on high-growth stocks. The Nasdaq is down 1.3% for the week, while the S&P 500 is up less than 0.1% and the Dow has gained roughly 0.6%.

The final weeks of the year are typically a strong period for the market, with the so-called Santa Claus rally usually creating a happy holidays for Wall Street. The S&P 500 is up 25% year to date.

“I think we’re probably in a market that is in its lane for the next few weeks until we get to the next [Fed’s Federal Open Market Committee] meeting,” said Yung-Yu Ma, chief investment strategist at BMO Wealth Management. “I think the spending’s going to be strong at the consumer level … I think when we see the November jobs report come out in the middle of December, I think that will be favorable.”

“I think the potential for recalibration, reconsideration or a market reassesment is most likely to come when the FOMC makes its announcements on [Dec. 15]. Until then, we’ll have a lot more of what we already know,” Ma added.

Friday also marks the unofficial start of the holiday shopping season, as investors will be looking for insight from Black Friday to determine the mood of the U.S. consumer.

Retail stocks have seen dramatic moves in both directions during this earnings season. On Wednesday, shares of Gap and Nordstrom tanked more than 20%, but Kohl’s jumped more than 10% a week ago after reporting strong sales growth.

Retail executives spoke during the quarter about how they are managing supply chain issues and inflation. It also remains to be seen if discussion around supply chain issues caused consumers to start their holiday shopping early, potentially denting fourth-quarter sales.

“I would not be surprised if that was a dynamic around the holiday season,” said Sarah Henry, a portfolio manager at Logan Capital Management. She added that her firm was looking for companies with long-term strategic advantages than trying to bet on the best holiday sales results.

Wednesday also saw several strong economic reports, with personal incomes and consumer spending for October coming in higher than expected and initial jobless claims hitting their lowest level since 1969. However, Core PCE, the Fed’s preferred inflation gauge, remained elevated at 4.1%.

There are no major economic releases scheduled for Friday. The stock market will close at 1 p.m. ET on Friday due to the holiday weekend.

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China’s real estate uncertainties persist, fueling market anxiety

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Listings of apartments for sale displayed at a real estate office in Shanghai, China, on Monday, Aug. 30, 2021.

Qilai Shen | Bloomberg | Getty Images

BEIJING — Wild swings in Chinese real estate stocks and bonds are keeping investors on edge — these news headlines could cause troubles in the sector to spill into the rest of the economy, says S&P Global Ratings.

While the plunge in Evergrande’s shares has abated, the volatility in other Chinese real estate companies has continued this month.

On Thursday, Kaisa shares briefly popped 20% after news it could stave off default. On the same day, a Shanghai-traded bond from developer Shimao plunged 30%, reminiscent of a sharp sell-off in the company’s bonds earlier this month.

“Headlines can hit sentiment and drive contagion,” Charles Chang, senior director and Greater China country lead for corporate ratings at S&P Global Ratings, said in a report earlier this month.

The risk Chang laid out is that news reports about defaults, or even the potential for default, could scare away Chinese homebuyers. And that drying up of demand would put developers out of business, along with the construction companies and other suppliers that work with them.

The consensus among economists is that the real estate slump is contained, since it’s driven by a top-down government decision to limit reliance on debt in the property industry. The People’s Bank of China summed up this view in mid-October, calling Evergrande a unique case, and affirming the overall health of the property sector.

But investors have grown increasingly worried about how Beijing’s crackdown would actually play out. News of the default of a far smaller developer, Fantasia, and growing financing troubles among other developers, began to exacerbate a sharp sell-off.

I’m not quite certain the regulators and authorities understand the damage this does to the offshore market, because a lot of investors won’t return.

Jennifer James

Janus Henderson Investors

The Markit iBoxx index for China high yield real estate bonds is clinging to monthly gains after a volatile few weeks — including a drop of nearly 18% in October and an almost 11% fall in September.

“It’s a really trying time for investors right now, probably more for bond investors than equity investors, because what we’re really watching is a policy transition unfolding in real time,” Jennifer James, portfolio manager and lead emerging markets analyst of Janus Henderson Investors, told CNBC earlier this month.

Even worse for foreign institutional investors, typically more comfortable with detailed messaging from companies and policymakers, China’s system tends to rely more on broad government statements and cautious corporate disclosures.

This lack of clarity has been a longstanding issue with investing in China-related assets.

Investors left in the dark

Rather than companies making announcements during the worst of the sell-off earlier this month, James said she often learned about how they were doing through news reports, days or weeks later. These include meetings with the government.

“I’m not quite certain the regulators and authorities understand the damage this does to the offshore market, because a lot of investors won’t return,” said James.

The lack of clarity exacerbated the situation, research institute Rhodium Group pointed out in a note on Tuesday.

“The most significant policy signal was a non-signal: the absence of a clear decision on what concrete action to take to resolve Evergrande’s situation and stem contagion in the property sector,” said analysts at Rhodium Group.

“Officials underestimated the severity of contagion and systemic concern, made confusing pledges to prevent a full reckoning, and ultimately claimed that the initial policy disciplines that precipitated the property stress had been misinterpreted,” it said.

“If the government intended to build confidence in the direction of financial reform, the outcome has been the exact opposite,” they said.

Developers struggle to get financing

In contrast with other industries, Chinese developers relied far more on the offshore bond market that gave them access to foreign investors.

But that channel of financing began to dry up as negative sentiment around the real estate companies increased on the back of concerns that Evergrande — which owes more than $300 billion — might default.

The number of Chinese real estate high-yield bond deals plummeted in October to just two deals, worth a total of $352 million, according to Dealogic. That’s down from $1.62 billion for 9 deals in September, and a high of 29 deals worth $8.5 billion in January, the data showed.

Those tight financing conditions reflect a relatively challenging environment for property developers to get capital on the mainland as well.

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Australia stocks slip ahead of October retail sales data release

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SINGAPORE — Shares in Australia slipped in Friday morning trade, with the country’s October retail sales data expected later in the day.

The S&P/ASX 200 fell 0.24% in morning trade, with shares of major miner BHP declining about 0.5%.

Australia’s retail sales data for October is set to be released at 8:30 a.m. HK/SIN.

Meanwhile, the Nikkei futures contract in Chicago was at 29,435 while its counterpart in Osaka was at 29,510. That compared against the Nikkei 225’s last close at 29,499.28.

In Covid developments, World Health Organization officials said Thursday they are monitoring a new variant with “a large number of mutations.” A special meeting is scheduled for Friday to discuss its implications for vaccines and treatments.

Stock picks and investing trends from CNBC Pro:

Markets in the U.S. were closed on Thursday for the Thanksgiving holiday.

Currencies

The U.S. dollar index, which tracks the greenback against a basket of its peers, was at 96.789 — still above levels below 96.5 seen earlier in the trading week.

The Japanese yen traded at 115.18 per dollar, still weaker than levels below 114.5 seen earlier this week. The Australian dollar was at $0.7183 following yesterday’s drop from levels above $0.72.

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