Connect with us

World

Here’s what you need to know

Published

on

People queue outside a vaccination center in Sydney on June 24, 2021, as residents were largely banned from leaving the city to stop a growing outbreak of the highly contagious Delta Covid-19 variant spreading to other regions.

SAEED KHAN | AFP | Getty Images

The “delta variant” has come to dominate headlines, having been discovered in India where it provoked an extreme surge in Covid-19 cases before spreading around the world.

But now a mutation of that variant has emerged, called “delta plus,” which is starting to worry global experts.

India has dubbed delta plus a “variant of concern,” and there are fears that it could potentially be more transmissible. In the U.K., Public Health England noted in its last summary that routine scanning of Covid cases in the country (where the delta variant is now responsible for the bulk of new infections) has found almost 40 cases of the delta variant, which has acquired the spike protein mutation K417N, i.e. delta plus.

It noted that, as of June 16, cases of the delta plus variant had also been identified in the U.S. (83 cases at the time the report was published last Friday) as well as Canada, India, Japan, Nepal, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Switzerland and Turkey.

India third wave?

As is common with all viruses, the coronavirus has mutated repeatedly since it emerged in China in late 2019. There have been a handful of variants that have emerged over the course of the pandemic that have changed the virus’ transmissibility, risk profile and even symptoms.

Read more: The fast-spreading delta Covid variant could have different symptoms, experts say

Several of those variants, such as the “alpha” variant (previously known as the “Kent” or “British” variant) and then the delta variant, have gone on to be dominant strains globally, hence the attention on delta plus.

India’s Health Ministry reportedly said Wednesday that it had found around 40 cases of the delta plus variant with the K417N mutation. The ministry released a statement on Tuesday in which it said that INSACOG, a consortium of 28 laboratories genome sequencing the virus in India during the pandemic, had informed it that the delta plus variant has three worrying characteristics.

These are, it said: increased transmissibility, stronger binding to receptors of lung cells and the potential reduction in monoclonal antibody response (which could reduce the efficacy of a life-saving monoclonal antibody therapy given to some hospitalized Covid patients).

India’s health ministry said it had alerted three states (Maharashtra, Kerala and Madhya Pradesh) after the delta plus variant was detected in genome sequenced samples from those areas.

The detection of a variation to the delta variant largely blamed for India’s catastrophic second wave of cases has stoked fears that India is ill-prepared for a potential third wave. But some experts are urging calm.

Dr. Chandrakant Lahariya, a physician-epidemiologist and vaccines and health systems expert based in New Delhi, told CNBC Thursday that that while the government should remain alert to the progress of the variant, there is “no reason to panic.”

“Epidemiologically speaking, I have no reason to believe that ‘Delta plus’ alters the current situation in a manner to accelerate or trigger the third wave,” he told CNBC via email.

“If we go by the currently available evidence, Delta plus is not very different from Delta variant. It is the same Delta variant with one additional mutation. The only clinical difference, which we know till now, is that Delta plus has some resistance to monoclonal antibody combination therapy. And that is not a major difference as the therapy itself is investigational and few are eligible for this treatment.”

He advised the public to follow Covid restrictions and to get vaccinated as soon as possible. Analysis from Public Health England released last week showed that two doses of the PfizerBioNTech or Oxford-AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccines are highly effective against hospitalization from the delta variant.

The WHO has said that it is tracking recent reports of a “delta plus” variant. “An additional mutation … has been identified,” Maria Van Kerkhove, WHO’s Covid-19 technical lead said at a briefing last week.

“In some of the delta variants we’ve seen one less mutation or one deletion instead of an additional, so we’re looking at all of it.”

Source link

World

Asia-Pacific stocks set for mixed start after Wall Street record close

Published

on

SINGAPORE — Shares in Asia-Pacific looked set for a mixed start after the major indexes on Wall Street sailed to record closing highs last week.

Futures pointed to a higher open for Japanese stocks. The Nikkei futures contract in Chicago was at 28,230 while its counterpart in Osaka was at 27,910. That compared against the Nikkei 225’s last close at 27,548.

Australian stocks, on the other hand, looked poised to open lower. The SPI futures contract sat at 7,335.0, against the S&P/ASX 200’s last close at 7,394.40.

On the economic data front, Singapore’s industrial production figures for June are set to be out at 1:00 p.m. HK/SIN.

Stock picks and investing trends from CNBC Pro:

On Friday, the Dow Jones Industrial Averaged closed above 35,000 for the first time ever while the S&P 500 jumped 1.01% to 4,411.79 and the Nasdaq Composite gained 1.04% to 14,836.99. Friday’s moves upward saw all three major indexes stateside at new closing highs.

Currencies

The U.S. dollar index, which tracks the greenback against a basket of its peers, was at 92.885 following a recent bounce from below 92.8.

The Japanese yen traded at 110.53 per dollar, weaker than levels below 110 seen against the greenback last week. The Australian dollar changed hands at $0.7368, above levels below $0.732 seen last week.

Here’s a look at what’s on tap:

  • Singapore: Industrial production for June

Source link

Continue Reading

World

Stock futures hold steady ahead of a huge week of Big Tech earnings

Published

on

Traders working at the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), today, Wednesday, April 21, 2021.

Source: NYSE

Stock futures opened little changed after the major averages finished the previous session at record closing highs and ahead of a busy week of earnings reports from technology’s heaviest hitters.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average eased by 5 points, or 0.01%. S&P 500 and Nasdaq 100 futures dipped 0.03% and 0.01%, respectively.

In the previous session, the Dow jumped 238.20 points, or 0.68%, to 35,061.55. The S&P 500 gained 1.01% to 4,411.79 and the Nasdaq Composite climbed 1.04% to 14,836.99.

All three of the major averages finished at record closing highs last week after the markets tumbled at the start of the week on concerns about the spread of the delta variant of Covid and how it would potentially hinder the economic recovery. The uncertainty briefly sent bond yields lower, and investors jumped into tech stocks. Both bonds and equities rebounded quickly by the end of the week.

Tech stocks rose last week on better-than-expected second-quarter earnings reports, as well as the continued spread of the delta variant. Twitter and Snap each surged Thursday following better-than-expected second-quarter earnings reports. Twitter ended Friday 3% higher, while Snap shot up 24%.

One of the busiest weeks of earnings reports is on deck in the week ahead, with Tesla kicking it off after the closing bell. Last week, CEO Elon Musk said the automaker would likely start accepting bitcoin for vehicle purchases again.

Big tech giants Apple, Alphabet and Microsoft are all set to report on Tuesday, and Google, Facebook, and Amazon will also report later in the week.

Investors will be watching the Fed’s two-day policy meeting, beginning Tuesday. The Federal Open Market Committee and the Board of Governors are expected to issue a statement on the stance of monetary policy Wednesday. On Thursday the Commerce Department will report second-quarter GDP data.

On Monday morning the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development will release new home sales data and the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas will release its monthly business activity index for manufacturing in Texas.

Source link

Continue Reading

World

Disturbing actions by China signal cold war, Stephen Roach warns

Published

on

Economist Stephen Roach warns Beijing’s crackdown against U.S.-listed China stocks will have widespread market implications.

Roach, who is considered one of the world’s leading experts on Asia, believes the actions are signaling the early stages of a cold war.

“I am a congenital optimist when it comes to China. But I find these actions really quite disturbing,” the former Morgan Stanley Asia chairman told CNBC’s “Trading Nation” on Friday. “China is going after the core of its new entrepreneurial driven economy, and it’s going after their business models.”

According to Roach, the tensions between the world’s two largest economies could get to levels not seen since the early 1970s.

“Even if U.S. companies don’t trade directly with China, virtually everything they touch goes through global supply chains,” said Roach. “So, a chill in the U.S.-China relationship has significant implications for U.S. companies and for investors investing in U.S. companies. You can’t get away from the China connection.”

CNBC’s Jim Cramer is delivering a similar warning investors. He believes it’s too risky to invest in China stocks that trade on U.S. exchanges due to the regulation threat.

On Friday, Beijing regulators targeted China education stocks TAL Education and New Oriental Education and Technology. Their shares tumbled. The same thing happened with Didi, China’s leading ride-hailing company, earlier in the week.

Roach, now a Yale senior fellow, has been sounding the alarm on the contentious backdrop for months. On “Trading Nation” in April, he warned U.S.-China relations were eroding and the two countries were on the brink of a cold war. Now, Roach suggests a line has been crossed.

“These are actions that are really in getting to the core of what has been so exciting about China for a number of years,” Roach said. “They concern me a lot.”

Disclaimer

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending