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Jasmine Hartin: Daughter-in-law of Tory grandee Lord Ashcroft charged with manslaughter after police officer shot dead in Belize | UK News

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The daughter-in-law of Conservative grandee Lord Ashcroft has been charged with manslaughter by negligence after a police superintendent was shot dead in Belize. 

Jasmine Hartin, the partner of Michael Ashcroft’s son Andrew, was found on a dock near where superintendent Henry Jemmott’s body was discovered in the town of San Pedro early on Friday.

Her lawyer Godfrey Smith told reporters late on Monday that she had been denied bail and will be remanded in prison.

“The charge is manslaughter by negligence,” he said. “Bail has been denied. We appeal to the Supreme Court, as is normal.”

Mr Smith said Hartin’s lawyers would have a statement Tuesday.

The pier where Henry Jemmott's body was found. Pic: AP/7 News Belize
Image:
The pier where Henry Jemmott’s body was found. Pic: AP/7 News Belize

She is expected to be taken from San Pedro to Belize City tomorrow for remand to prison.

Police Commissioner Chester C Williams told local media that Hartin avoided making a statement, preferring to wait for the presence of her lawyer

He said a single gunshot was heard “and upon investigating, police found the female on a pier, and she had what appeared to be blood on her arms and on her clothing.”

“A firearm was also seen on the pier that has been retrieved and we have learned that the firearm belonged to the police and was assigned to Mr. Jemmott,” he told a news conference Friday.

Hartin’s father-in-law Lord Ashcroft is a former deputy chairman of Britain’s Conservative Party and a major financial backer.

Jasmine Hartin is in police custody. Pic: AP/7 News Belize
Image:
Jasmine Hartin is in police custody. Pic: AP/7 News Belize

He also has Belizean citizenship and was once its representative before the United Nations.

Police Commissioner Mr Williams added that the incident “seems rather personal and not an attack”.

“From what we know is that they are friends. From what we have been made to understand they were drinking. From investigation, they were alone on the pier and yes they were both fully clothed.”

He said Hartin “was somewhat in an emotional state walking herself on the pier. We believe that she is to some extent affected by it.”

LinkedIn accounts indicate that Hartin and her husband were connected with a local resort in Belize.

Mr Jemmott's sister said he had a 'passion for life'. Pic: AP/7 News Belize
Image:
Mr Jemmott’s sister said he had a ‘passion for life’. Pic: AP/7 News Belize

Mr Jemmott’s sister, Marie Jemmott Tzul, told 7 News Belize television that her brother loved life and was the father of five children.

“The investigation can say something else but I think they killed him,” she said.

She added that the only information the family had was that he was with a woman they did not know and his body was found in the water.

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COVID-19: President Jair Bolsonaro in trouble as Brazil’s COVID crisis inquiry becomes box office viewing | World News

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Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro loves meeting people; he can’t get enough of it, he travels the country looking to shake hands and kiss babies.

He likes doing interviews, he’ll talk about subjects varied and important to him.

There is just one caveat – he hates independent journalists, isn’t too keen on foreign ones, and won’t talk to anyone who doesn’t love him or agree with him on everything – “Trump of the Tropics” pretty much says it all.

President Jair Bolsonaro has been widely criticised for his handling of the pandemic
Image:
President Bolsonaro has been widely criticised for his handling of the pandemic

Over the past year, I’ve travelled around Brazil attempting to speak to him and I have singularly failed.

His people are so determined to stop me from asking their boss a simple question – or worse – seeing him explode into a storm of foul-mouthed invective, that my slimmest chance of a breakthrough via a temporary accreditation badge has now been revoked.

We can’t get near him for now.

But in reality, we are not very important, what is important though is a parliamentary inquiry into his handling of the pandemic.

It’s important, and worse for Mr Bolsonaro, he knows he is in trouble.

The parliamentary inquiry has gained even more traction after the country recorded more than 500,000 deaths from COVID-19.

Anti-Bolsonaro protesters march in Sao Paulo, Brazil.
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Anti-Bolsonaro protesters march in Sao Paulo, Brazil

It’s become absolute box office and Senate TV is now required viewing here in Brazil.

It’s streamed all day as witness after witness allege the government failed to buy vaccines, promoted ineffective COVID cures and neglected to source adequate oxygen supplies.

The critics of the government are not just confined to opposition politicians.

Gilmar Mendes says he warned the president of the impending pandemic in March
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Gilmar Mendes says he warned the president of the impending pandemic in March last year

Here in the capital Brasilia, I spoke to one federal supreme court judge who met with Mr Bolsonaro in March last year.

Gilmar Mendes told me he warned the president about the impending pandemic and offered his help and support.

He described the president as a man in crisis.

General Elieser Girao says any inquiry into the government's handling of the crisis is politically motivated
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General Elieser Girao says any inquiry into the government’s handling of the crisis is politically motivated

“It seemed to me in that moment this was a man, I even said, a little tortured by the facts. Very emotional, very emotional,” Mr Mendes said.

“He said that the economy was doing well, and that this pandemic was now coming, and that social isolation was a poison.”

Mr Mendes said the president’s main concern was, and still is, the economy, and he prioritised it accordingly.

“So he prioritised his concerns, maybe he generated much more around the economic issue, as [this] was reflected in the organisation of the government.”

Brazil has recorded over 500,000 deaths from COVID-19 and the pending parliamentary enquiry will look at Jair Bolsonaro's handling of the enquiry
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The parliamentary inquiry will look at Jair Bolsonaro’s handling of the pandemic

President Bolsonaro is a divisive figure in Brazil who plays entirely to his supporter base.

At his last event, in Sao Paulo, he turned up at the front of a motorbike rally.

He resolutely denies the dangers of COVID, fought against lockdowns and masks, and promoted drugs like hydroxychloroquine made famous by Donald Trump.

During a Facebook live last week, he made the argument for herd immunity saying it is “more effective against the disease than the vaccine”.

He openly advocated for exposure to the virus and downplayed the efficacy of the vaccines.

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‘Bolsonaro out!’ – Protesters descend on Sao Paulo.

These comments came in the week scientists in Brazil warned the country’s death toll could eclipse the United States – currently the highest in the world with more than 602,000 deaths.

In my quest to speak to the president, I went to visit one of his closest political allies, former soldier now congressman General Elieser Girao Monteiro Filho.

When we arrived he was busily planning the latest presidential visit, this time to the general’s home state, Rio Grande do Norte.

He oozed pride as he pointed out the helicopter route to two events with a laser pen on his map, and then he proudly showed me pictures of him and the president, blown up into posters adorning the walls of his small office.

Like the president, General Girao, as he is known, has had COVID-19.

Unlike the president, he has been vaccinated, wears masks, and sanitises his hands.

Still, he says any inquiry into the government’s handling of the crisis is politically motivated and says one man – Mr Bolsonaro – cannot be blamed for everything.

'Fora Bolsonaro', meaning 'Bolsonaro Out', has been a common message on the streets of Sao Paulo
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‘Fora Bolsonaro’, meaning ‘Bolsonaro Out’, has been a common message on the streets of Sao Paulo

“Unfortunately COVID in Brazil, specifically in Brazil, was transformed into a political war and this political war, unfortunately, is leading to many people not getting a prescription for the medicine that immediately treats the virus,” he told me.

There is no such medicine. I assume he is referring to the president’s hydroxychloroquine treatment plan, widely debunked around the world.

Some say Brazil is in the midst of its third wave, others argue the first wave just never ended.

Activists display a cloth covered with small coffins and the Portuguese word for genocide outside Congress in protest of the high death toll from COVID-19. Pic AP
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Activists display a cloth covered with small coffins and the Portuguese word for genocide outside Congress in protest of the high death toll from COVID-19. Pic AP

But even though Brazil’s infection rates are still high, lockdowns are still not regarded as the solution by this government.

“I believe the president acted correctly when he reacted [in opposition] to the closures. Lockdowns have not been successful anywhere in the world.”

Brasilia is a man-made city with wide boulevards and stylised buildings designed and built in the 1950s by Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer.

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It’s been described as a city of clean lines, rational planning and space. It feels homogenised and un-Brazilian compared to the throbbing atmospheric cities of Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo.

But Brasilia is now home to one of the most important inquiries in Brazil’s recent history, and its conclusions could have consequences that change the direction of this huge country.

Next year there are elections – and the recent street protests across the country, and the latest polls showing Mr Bolsonaro’s popularity plummeting, suggest he’s in trouble.

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Saskatchewan: More than 750 unmarked graves found on site of former indigenous school in Canada | World News

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Investigators have found more than 750 unmarked graves at the site of a former indigenous school in Canada.

The discovery of the 751 graves follows the news that the remains of 215 children were found at another school nearby.

Bobby Cameron, chief of the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous First Nations, said: “We are treating this as a crime”.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaking after the 215 children's remains were found near British Colombia.
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Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaking after the 215 children’s remains were found near British Colombia.

He warned how he expected more graves to be found on residential school grounds in Canada.

And Mr Cameron vowed not to stop “until we find all the bodies”, describing the tragedy as a “crime against humanity, an assault on First Nations.”

The 751 graves were found at the Marieval Indian Residential School, open from 1899 until 1997, where Cowessess is now located.

They were marked in the past – but the markers were removed by people operating the school, said Chief Cadmusn Delmore, of the Cowessess First Nation.

The reserve is about situated about 87 miles east of Regina, the capital of Saskatchewan, in western Canada.

The 215 children’s remains – some as young as three – were found buried on the former site of Canada’s largest indigenous school, near Kamloops, British Colombia, in May.

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UEFA abolishes away goals rule after more than half a century | UK News

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Europe’s football governing body UEFA has abolished the away goals rule for all of its club competitions from next season.

All ties that are level on aggregate at the end of the second leg will now go to extra time.

Paris Saint-Germain’s victory over Bayern Munich in last season’s Champions League quarter-finals will go down in history as the last away goals result in the tournament before the rule change.

The rule, introduced in 1965, has led to some dramatic moments in recent years, including Tottenham’s stoppage-time success over Ajax in the 2019 Champions League semi-final.

UEFA said away goals would also no longer be a separating criteria when looking at matches between two or more sides level on points in the group stage of a competition.

Paris St Germain's victory over Bayern Munich in last year's Champions League will go down as the last win on away goals
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Paris Saint-Germain’s victory over Bayern Munich in last year’s Champions League will go down as the last win on away goals in the tournament

However, the number of away goals scored in all group matches could be used as an additional separating criteria if required.

UEFA president Aleksander Ceferin said as the end of the rule was announced: “The away goals rule has been an intrinsic part of UEFA competitions since it was introduced in 1965.

“However, the question of its abolition has been debated at various UEFA meetings over the last few years. Although there was no unanimity of views, many coaches, fans and other football stakeholders have questioned its fairness and have expressed a preference for the rule to be abolished.”

Mr Ceferin added that the away goals rule had begun to go against its original purpose and was dissuading home teams from attacking.

This because the sides would fear conceding a goal at their own stadium would give their opponent a crucial advantage.

He continued: “There is also criticism of the unfairness, especially in extra-time, of obliging the home team to score twice when the away team has scored.

“It is fair to say that home advantage is nowadays no longer as significant as it once was.”

UEFA has cited statistics since the mid-1970s which showed how the gap between home and away wins had reduced.

It talked about better pitch quality, standardised pitch sizes, and even video assistance referees (VAR) as factors in the decline of home advantage.



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