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Chinese electric car start-up Xpeng shows off new flying vehicle 

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Electric vehicle start-up Xpeng unveiled its first generation prototype for a flying vehicle at the Beijing Auto Show on Sept. 26, 2020.

Evelyn Cheng

BEIJING — Alibaba-backed Xpeng is putting money into flying car technology as part of the company’s long-term strategy. 

The electric automaker revealed Saturday at the Beijing Auto Show the first in a series of electric flying vehicles the start-up said it is developing.

With eight propellers and a capsule-like frame, the vehicle resembles a human-carrying drone more than a flying car. The prototype was developed by Xpeng Heitech, a technology unit majority-owned by Xpeng and CEO He Xiaopeng.

Xpeng said in a release that the unit is part of the company’s long term research and development, and the core businesses and development strategy remain unchanged. The company foresees benefits from the research in areas such as precision and mapping technologies. 

The flying vehicle can hold up to two passengers and is designed for low altitudes of 5 meters to 25 meters (16.4 feet to 82 feet), according to Xpeng. The project is in a concept phase, and the company said it will evaluate prospects of the space before proceeding with any substantial investment.

“This is a long-range R&D exploration for us to really think about mobility in a greater context,” Brian Gu, vice chairman and president of Xpeng, told CNBC in an interview on the sidelines of the Beijing Auto Show on Saturday.

“We think in the future not only electric vehicles will have the smart mobility autonomous driving features, but with other technology, enable other devices that can create a multi-dimensional ecosystem, that will be very exciting,” Gu said. “That’s why we are investing in that area, and doing some exploration.”

Regulation has been a major hurdle for the development of human-carrying drones and self-driving cars.

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Four aides test positive for Covid-19

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U.S. Vice President Mike Pence, stands with his wife, Karen, after casting his ballot for the upcoming election at a polling station in Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S. October 23, 2020.

Bryan Woolston | Reuters

Vice President Mike Pence will not quarantine himself despite several of his aides testing positive for coronavirus, his office said.

Pence’s chief of staff Marc Short is isolating after testing positive on Saturday, Devin O’Malley, a spokesman for the vice president, said in a statement. A senior political advisor to the vice president, Marty Obst, and two other aides also tested positive, according to NBC News.

O’Malley said in a statement issued late on Saturday that Pence and second lady Karen Pence both tested negative and “remain in good health.”

Pence is expected to hold a rally in Kinston, North Carolina later on Sunday. The battleground state is neck-and-neck with state polls on average showing Democratic nominee Joe Biden ahead by just over one percentage point.

“While Vice President Pence is considered a close contact with Mr. Short, in consultation with the White House Medical Unit, the Vice President will maintain his schedule in accordance with the CDC guidelines for essential personnel,” O’Malley said in the statement.

White House chief of staff Mark Meadows declined to say how many individuals connected to the vice president’s office have tested positive when pressed by CNN’s Jake Tapper on Sunday morning.

Meadows said that he would not disclose personal information “unless it’s the vice president or the president, or someone that’s very close to them where there’s people in harms way.”

The cluster of cases near the vice president comes at a perilous time politically.

The election between President Donald Trump and Biden, the former vice president, will take place in nine days. Trump was hospitalized for Covid-19 earlier this month, but has since said he recovered.

On Monday, Pence is expected to be on the Senate floor for the confirmation of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. At a rally in Tallahassee on Saturday evening, Pence said he “wouldn’t miss that vote for the world.”

Barrett’s confirmation, now seemingly assured, was put in jeopardy after three Republican senators contracted the virus.

Two of those lawmakers — Sen. Mike Lee of Utah and Sen. Thom Tillis of North Carolina — attended Barrett’s White House nomination ceremony last month, which was later connected to at least eight cases.

Pence, who is 61, is at elevated risk for severe illness from Covid-19 because of his age. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the greatest risk is to those 85 and older.

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China’s electric car strategy’s implications for U.S. energy security

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Climate change is ‘number one issue facing humanity’

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Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden participates in the final presidential debate against U.S. President Donald Trump at Belmont University on October 22, 2020 in Nashville, Tennessee.

Justin Sullivan | Getty Images

Joe Biden declared climate change the “number one issue facing humanity” and vowed a national transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy that could create millions of new jobs.

“It’s the number one issue facing humanity. And it’s the number one issue for me,” Biden said of climate change during an episode of Pod Save America released Saturday. He was interviewed by Dan Pfeiffer, a former senior advisor to President Barack Obama.

“Climate change is the existential threat to humanity,” the former vice president said. “Unchecked, it is going to actually bake this planet. This is not hyperbole. It’s real. And we have a moral obligation.”

Scientists have repeatedly warned that climate-change fueled disasters will continue to get worse and parts of the world will become unlivable as global temperatures rise and governments fail to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by reducing the burning of oil, gas and coal.

Biden, the Democratic presidential nominee, has boasted a $2 trillion plan that invests significantly in clean energy in the transportation, electricity and building industry, cuts fossil fuel emissions and improves infrastructure.

Biden’s plan also puts the U.S. on a path to zero carbon pollution from the electricity sector by 2035 and net-zero emissions by 2050. Coal and natural gas comprise more than 60% of the electricity sector, according to the Energy Information Association.

“It’s going to create millions of jobs … We can’t be cavalier about the impact it’s going to have on how we’re going to transition to do all this,” Biden said of his plan on the podcast. “But I just think it’s a gigantic opportunity, a gigantic opportunity to create really good jobs.”

Scientists say that Biden’s transition plan is required to avoid the most catastrophic consequences of climate change.

“No one is going to build another oil or gas-fired electric plant. They’re going to build one that is fired by renewable energy,” Biden said on the podcast. “We have to invest billions of dollars in making sure that we’re able to transmit over our lines.”

Biden’s plan to transition from oil and natural gas could be politically popular but may potentially hurt him in major oil and gas states as the Nov. 3 election nears.

The issue is particularly important in Pennsylvania, a state that could be decisive on election day and has a strong fracking industry and Trump base in the southwestern part of the state. Biden, however, has said he would only ban fracking on federal lands. Most oil and gas does not come from federal lands.

But oil and gas executives have been aware of the global movement towards renewable energy and say the U.S. will still require fossil fuel production for decades to come even during a global transition.

During the podcast, Biden said he’s gone to the major labor unions in the U.S. to convince them to sign onto his climate change plan, emphasizing that he won’t “discount the concerns” of people who could lose work during a transition to renewables.

In Thursday’s presidential debate, Biden emphasized that the transition away from climate-changing fossil fuels would occur “over time.” After the debate, he said that fossil fuels would not be eliminated until 2050 as part of his plan.

President Trump, who has pulled the U.S. from the Paris climate accord and consistently expressed support for fracking, responded to Biden’s remarks with a traditional appeal to voters in competitive oil and gas states.

More from CNBC Environment:
‘We are out of time:’ Destructive wildfire season grows longer in Colorado, scientists warn
September 2020 was the hottest on record worldwide
Heatwaves are becoming more deadly as nights warm faster than days

“Basically what he is saying is he is going to destroy the oil industry,” Trump said during Thursday’s debate. “Will you remember that, Texas? Will you remember that, Pennsylvania? Oklahoma? Ohio?”

Trump has denied the science of climate change and reversed more than 70 major environmental regulations during his four years in office, with nearly 30 more in progress.

But climate change has been a top issue of the 2020 presidential election, especially among younger voters.

Nearly two-thirds of voters think the federal government is not doing enough to mitigate climate change, according to a Pew Research Center poll this year. Roughly 79% of Americans said the U.S. should make developing alternative sources of energy like wind and solar a priority.

Biden leads on climate change by an enormous margin, with 58% to 19% of registered voters saying the former vice president would address the problem better than President Trump, according to an NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll.

This year, climate-change fueled disasters including record-setting wildfires in the U.S. West and one of the most active Atlantic hurricane seasons ever have plagued the country.

September 2020 was the warmest month on record worldwide and this year is set to be one of the five hottest in recorded history.

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