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Locust swarms: UN says 13 million people in East Africa could face food crisis | World News

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The United Nations has warned if the locust swarms spreading across East Africa are not stopped now it could affect millions of people and cost more than $1bn (£766.5m).

In a stark warning to the world’s governments, the UN’s World Food Programme (WFP) said it will be vastly more cost effective to raise the $76m (£59m) needed to stop the swarms now instead of dealing with the consequences if it turns into a plague.

It said up to 13 million people’s food security could be further threatened if the pests are not tackled imminently.

Locusts in Kenya
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Locusts in Kenya

The desert locust swarms were first spotted in December in Kenya, Somalia and Ethiopia and reached Uganda on Sunday, prompting its government to deploy military forces to help with pesticide spraying.

It is the worst locust invasion Kenya has seen in 70 years and the worst in Somalia and Ethiopia in 25 years, with crops destroyed as the insects exploit wet conditions after unusually heavy rains.

Aerial spraying is considered the only effective control.

Uganda deployed soldiers to spray pesticides on swarms of desert locusts after they arrived on Sunday
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Uganda deployed soldiers to spray pesticides on swarms of desert locusts after they arrived on Sunday
The infestation is posing an unprecedented threat to food security. according to  the authorities.
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The infestation is posing an unprecedented threat to food security, according to authorities.

The desert locust is considered the world’s most dangerous migratory pest, with a swarm of one square kilometre (0.38sq mile) able to consume the equivalent of crops that could feed 35,000 people for a year.

The WFP’s executive director, David Beasley, said: “The Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO) needs US$76m to help stop the locusts.

“Do nothing now and WFP will need up to 15 times that amount – more than $1bn – to assist people devastated by losing crops and livelihoods.

“Preventing a catastrophe in East Africa is a far better investment than responding to its consequences and impact on the lives of millions across the region.”

Kenya is experiencing is worst locust infestation in more than 70 years
Image:
Kenya is experiencing its worst locust infestation in more than 70 years

The FAO has so far raised $22m (£16.8m) out of the $76m it has appealed for to launch a large scale response to the locust infestation.

Desert locust swarms are now multiplying across Somalia, Kenya and Ethiopia and more have already been observed in Eritrea, Djibouti and northeastern Uganda, the regional Food Security and Nutrition Working Group warned on Friday.

“Looking forward, given favourable forecast weather conditions, swarms are expected to increase in areas already affected, as well as spread to neighbouring areas,” the update said.

“There is also a high risk that locusts will spread to South Sudan.”

Locusts in Kenya
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Locusts in Kenya

Several million people in South Sudan are already facing hunger as the country struggles to emerge from a civil war.

The FAO also expects locusts to breed and spread in coming months as the March-April start of the long rains is forecast to encourage the locusts to breed again and spread even further.

This is the second warning this week, after the UN’s humanitarian chief Mark Lowcock said a region where 13 million people already face severe food insecurity cannot afford another jolt.

The UN warned: “We simply cannot afford another major shock.”

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Brexit: UK and EU will ‘rip each other apart’ in talks, France predicts | Politics News

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Prime Minister Boris Johnson has been warned that he will face a tough battle with the European Union in his efforts to secure a trade deal in the aftermath of Brexit.

France’s foreign minister Jean-Yves le Drian gave the prediction during the Munich Security Conference, as both sides prepare to begin negotiations on the UK’s future relationship with the bloc.

Mr le Drian warned Mr Johnson that Brussels will defend its interests when talks formally open up next month, saying: “I think that on trade issues and the mechanism for future relations, which we are going to start on, we are going to rip each other apart.

“But that is part of negotiations, everyone will defend their own interests.”



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The UK’s chief negotiator David Frost is set to make it clear that Mr Johnson will walk away from talks with the EU, unless it drops what he calls its “ridiculous and unreasonable” demands.

Mr Frost is said to be travelling to Brussels on Monday to lay down his opening gambit, following a meeting of his 40-strong negotiating team last week.

Mr le Drian is a close ally of French President Emmanuel Macron, and is one of the latest major European voices to speak out about the tough road ahead for the UK.

Fishing will be high on the agenda during trade talks, and it is believed that Mr Macron wants EU fleets to keep their access to UK waters, in what is set to be a key demand in the negotiations.

However, Mr Johnson has said that the UK will take control of its fishing waters, acting as a “independent coastal state” once the Brexit transition period is over.

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The EU has sent repeated warnings to the UK ahead of talks, saying it should not expect to be able to carry enjoying “high quality” market access if it demands on moving away from the bloc’s existing social and environmental standards.

The new European Commission president, Ursula von der Leyen, told the European Parliament this week that Mr Johnson would have to accept a “level playing field” on rules and standards.

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Britons land in Sharm el Sheikh as 5-year flight restriction lifted | World News

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One of the first flights from the UK to Sharm el Sheikh has landed after restrictions on flying to the Egyptian resort were lifted.

British tourists on the TUI flight from Gatwick were greeted by celebrations, with fire engines jetting water over the top of the aircraft and a reception featuring flowers, music and cocktails.

Flights between the UK and Sharm el Sheikh were halted in November 2015 after a bomb blew up on a Russian airliner shortly after take-off from Sharm el Sheikh airport, killing all 224 people on board.

Fire engines sprayed water over the plane
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Fire engines sprayed water over the plane
Passengers were greeted with celebrations
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Passengers were greeted with celebrations

The Department for Transport lifted the restrictions in October, saying there had been “improvements in security procedures” and “close co-operation between our aviation security experts and their Egyptian counterparts”.

The bombing had forced the UK to repatriate about 16,000 tourists in 2015 as the airport’s security procedures were considered high risk.

TUI, the UK’s biggest travel company, said last year it would be resuming flights to the Egyptian resort this month.

Rival company Easyjet also said it would be restarting flights to Sharm el Sheikh.

The airline said two flights a week would depart from Manchester from 7 June, while flights from Gatwick will begin on 30 September.

The ban had sparked a steep decline in UK visitors to the region, which had previously seen hundreds of thousands of British tourists each year.

Egypt disputes Russia's claim of terrorism over the Metrojet crash
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The plane bombing killed 224 people

Tourists were forced to either take multiple flights or a ferry from Hurghada to visit the Red Sea destination.

It was one of the factors which led to the collapse of airline Monarch in October 2017.

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Coronavirus: Americans start to leave cruise ship as Britons claim ‘we’ve been forgotten’ | World News

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The US has evacuated some of its citizens from a cruise ship quarantined over coronavirus fears.

Two charter flights carrying some of the 380 Americans on board the Diamond Princess ship moored at Yokohama Port near Tokyo had left Japan for America on Sunday, the US State Department said.

Once back in the US, the repatriated passengers will have to spend another two weeks in quarantine at a US military facility.

Evacuated US passengers seen on a shuttle bus
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Evacuated US passengers seen on a shuttle bus


US couple in quarantine on cruise chip in Japan







US couple to evacuate quarantined cruise ship

Of the 3,500 people on board the ship, 355 have tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.

One US couple, Cheryl and Paul Molesky, filmed themselves boarding the flight after being kept inside their cabin for 12 days.

“Well we’re exhausted but we’re on the plane and that’s a good feeling,” Mrs Molesky said.

Her husband added they had spent “five hours on the bus, waiting to get off the bus” before boarding the flight.

Canada, Hong Kong and Italy are also planning similar repatriation flights.

Meanwhile, Britons held on the ship have accused the UK government of “forgetting” about them.

In a video message, British passenger David Abel said: “Every country except the UK has become involved, and that is really wonderful for the people on board the ship.



British citizen David Abel is currently quarantined aboard a cruise ship off the coast of Japan







Briton describes cruise quarantine

“Every country except for the United Kingdom.

“It feels that we’ve been forgotten. That you don’t really care about us, and that you’re actually not wanting us to come home.”

Fellow Briton Alan Steele, who was diagnosed with COVID-19 and taken to hospital while celebrating his honeymoon on the cruise ship, said it was time for Boris Johnson to “get the Brits back”.

Mr Steele, who has since tested negative for the disease, posted on Facebook: “I think it is about time boris got the brits back to england as the japanese are being totally incompetent and do not realise you cannot keep ppl in solitary confinement for 28 days without damaging their mental health. [sic]

Alan Steele with his wife on their wedding day
Image:
Alan Steele with his wife on their wedding day

“What does WHO [World Health Organisation] have to say about this and I am sure cruel punishment like this has to be illegal.”

News agency PA understands that the UK government is considering a repatriation flight.

A Foreign Office spokeswoman said: “We sympathise with all those caught up in this extremely difficult situation.

“We are urgently considering all options to guarantee the health and safety of the British people on board the Diamond Princess, in line with the latest advice from the Chief Medical Officer and the World Health Organisation, and are working closely with the Japanese authorities and our international partners.

“Our staff in Tokyo, including the ambassador, have been in regular contact with the British passengers and crew on the Diamond Princess and we have also been speaking to families in the UK.”

Other passengers fear they may be kept in quarantine beyond the initial 19 February deadline, after Princess Cruises president Jan Swartz said the quarantine may be extended for guests who had close contact with a person who tested positive for COVID-19.

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Ms Swartz said: “We also now understand the Japanese may handle a select group of guests differently, anyone who had close contact with a person who tested positive – such as a cabin mate – may have to restart their quarantine from the date their close contact ended.”

It comes as the death toll from COVID-19 hit more than 1,773, according to the Johns Hoskins Centre for Systems Science and Engineering.

So far there have been more than 71,000 suspected and confirmed cases of COVID-19, with many of the cases concentrated in mainland China.

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