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‘Let common sense prevail’: Plea from Irish businesses | World News

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One of the largest cross-border businesses on the island of Ireland has called for “common sense to prevail” in last-ditch efforts to reach a Brexit deal.

O’Neill’s, based in County Tyrone, produces Gaelic football kits. Each team’s colours can cross the border up to eight times during the manufacturing process.

The yarn arrives in Dublin Port, crosses the border for weaving and repeatedly for dyeing, for cutting, for stitching, for packaging and for distribution.



Leo Varadkar says Ireland's preference is for a Brexit deal to be struck in October







Leo Varadkar says a Brexit delay is his preferred outcome if a deal cannot be reached

The managing director says politicians need to explain to his staff why the company is preparing to relocate its Northern Ireland factory if there’s a no-deal Brexit.

Kieran Kennedy said: “Look at the 700 staff here in Strabane, they come from all traditions, see how it would affect their livelihood.”

“Do they want to be associated with losing jobs for the sake of the union or whatever? We just want to trade how we have always traded, so let common sense prevail,” he added.



Sky's deputy political editor Sam Coates explores the plan for Northern Ireland as the EU and the UK government head into intense talks.







Sky’s Sam Coates explains the latest customs plan

At the Empire Music Hall in Belfast, where comedians make their debut, a Sky News panel of experts concluded that a no-deal Brexit would be no joke.

Victor Chestnutt, deputy president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union, said: “If food flows into the UK tariff-free and we face a tariff going out, we are on a hiding to nothing. Our farmers will disappear.”

“The solution is some leadership in politics,” added Tina McKenzie, who chairs the Federation of Small Businesses NI.

“We put forward actual solutions… the enhanced economic zone, where trade can flow through Northern Ireland into GB from Europe and from GB into Europe via Northern Ireland.”

Unionists rejected Theresa May’s backstop position of Northern Ireland remaining in the EU’s customs union and single market, if necessary.

The EU rejected Boris Johnson’s alternative – Northern Ireland leaving the customs union but accepting single market regulations.

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Hopes had all but faded until the prime minister met his Irish counterpart Leo Varadkar and announced that they could see a pathway to an agreement.

Aodhan Connolly, director of the Northern Ireland Retail Consortium, said: “Any alternative arrangements need to do what the backstop does. What we need…is to have unfettered access to both the Great British market and the EU market.”

Some point to the use of technology at the Norway-Sweden border but 1,300 commercial vehicles cross that each day, compared to 13,000 at the Northern Irish border.



The Irish border problem explained







The Irish border has emerged as Brexit’s biggest problem. One proposed solution is called ‘the backstop’. So what is it?

Janice Gault, chief executive of the Northern Ireland Hotels Federation, asked: “Are you going to chip every cow? Are you going to chip every human? If a visitor arrives from North America, I don’t necessarily want to have to chip and pin them when they arrive.”

The subtle nature of the border enables people to identify as British or Irish or both – a key component of the Good Friday Agreement.

It is the political implication of almost any practical solution offered that keeps the border front and centre of what many regard as the endgame.

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Designer baby revolution could be only two years away, research suggests | World News

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It could be less than two years until the creation of “ethically sound” designer babies begins, says one expert.

The risks of gene editing are now low enough to justify using the technique with human embryos, according to new analysis by Dr Kevin Smith, from Abertay University in Dundee.

He argues that in a few years a morally justifiable attempt could start a revolution in producing genetically-modified (GM) people.

Dr Smith said it could one day help protect people from deadly diseases and improve quality of life in older age.

Gene editing involves scientists adding, removing or altering an organism’s DNA.

Questions over using the technique on human genomes has always been controversial – particularly if certain changes are passed from one generation to the next.

Dr Smith said: “The human germline is by no means perfect, with evolution having furnished us with rather minimal protection from diseases that tend to strike in our later years, including cardiovascular disease, cancer and dementia.

“GM techniques offer the prospect of protecting future people against these and other common disorders.

“This has previously been achieved to an extent in GM experiments on animals.

“If several common disorders could be avoided or delayed by genetically modifying humans, the average disease-free lifespan could be substantially extended.”

Dr Smith, head of Abertay’s biomedical science courses, said it could also give hope to parents at risk of transmitting serious genetic disease to their children.

However, he warns that an ethical approach is vital to win the trust of the public.

The world’s first gene-edited babies were born in China last year in an effort to make them resistant to HIV.

The development was widely criticised and the scientist involved had his work stopped as authorities investigated him for breaking the law.

Dr Smith’s analysis is published in the journal Bioethics.

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Traditional soups and broths could stop malarial infection | Science & Tech News

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Some traditional soups may be as effective as the leading antimalarial drugs in combating the disease.

Around 500,000 people die every year from malaria worldwide, many of them children, with hundreds of thousands more made seriously ill by the parasite, which is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected mosquitoes.

Half the world’s population is vulnerable to infection and resistance to conventional drugs appears to be increasing.

Researchers from Imperial College London and Great Ormond Street Hospital began investigating the possible impact of traditional cures after the discovery of the antimalarial artemesin in qinghao, a herb used in ancient Chinese medicine to combat fever.

The scientists found that some traditional vegetable and meat broths interrupted the life cycle of Plasmodium falciparum, the unicellular protozoan which causes 99% of deaths from malaria.

The malaria parasite is spread trough the bite of infected mosquitoes
Image:
The malaria parasite is spread through the bite of infected mosquitoes

The study involved pupils from Eden Primary school in London being asked to bring in samples of homemade soup and broths made using family recipes passed down through generations.

The children’s ethnic backgrounds ranged from across Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East.

The researchers incubated extracts from 56 broths for three days with different cultures of Plasmodium falciparum to see if any could stop the growth of the sexually immature parasites.

They also assessed whether the samples could block sexual maturation – the stage at which the parasite can infect the mosquito.

Many samples were found to increase the rate of parasite growth. But five of the broths curbed growth by more than 50%, with two of them as effective as a leading antimalarial drug, dihydroartemisinin.

Four others were more than 50% effective at blocking sexual maturation, so potentially stopping malarial transmission.

Publishing the results in Archives of Disease in Childhood the authors said: “This journey, mirroring that of artemisinin from the qinghao herb, may as yet reveal another source of potent anti-infective treatment.”

The recipes of the vegetarian, chicken and beef-based broths varied, and no particular ingredient was common to those who demonstrated the strongest antimalarial activity.

They warned that the active ingredients in the broths studied are yet to be identified and tested in clinical trials.

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Grace Millane’s former partner: She asked me to choke her during sex | World News

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British backpacker Grace Millane belonged to BDSM dating sites and allowed a former partner to choke her during sex, a court has heard.

An ex-boyfriend of the university graduate from Essex said they had used a system of safe words and signals to make sure she was never in danger.

A statement from the man, whose identity is protected, was read to the jury at the trial of a 27-year-old New Zealander accused of strangling Grace to death at the end of a Tinder date.

Grace Millane entering hotel after date with alleged killer
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Grace Millane entering hotel after date with the man accused of murdering her

The defendant, who also cannot be named for legal reasons, says Miss Millane died accidentally during consensual sex at his apartment in Auckland last December after she asked him to put his hands on her neck during rough sex.

Miss Millane’s former partner said in a statement read to Auckland High Court: “When we researched it we knew the word was asphyxiation.

“Grace and I discussed keeping hands wide and on the side of the neck, never on the front.

“Grace and I would have a safe word most of the time which we had discussed, something like “turtle” or something ridiculous. Grace and I used a tapping practice too. If Grace tapped me three times then it would stop.

“Grace would tap out maybe one in four times.

“Grace would be sure to do this and I trusted that anytime it was too much for Grace she would do this. Grace and I were careful to discuss not only the physical but the psychological aspects to practising BDSM.”

The suspect cannot be identified for legal reasons
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The suspect cannot be identified for legal reasons

Statements from police revealed that Miss Millane had been active on BDSM dating site Whiplr an hour before meeting the defendant outside a central city casino.

Defence barrister Ron Mansfield told the jury: “All the evidence shows that Miss Millane was a loving, bright, intelligent young woman and she was.

“That is her reputation and that should be her reputation and her memory at the start of this trial and at the conclusion if it.

“The fact that we need to discuss with you what she liked to do in the bedroom should have no impact on he reputation at all.”

But, he said: “It’s important that we are fully informed. It’s not the time for embarrassment or immaturity.

“If this couple engaged in consensual sexual activity which included pressure being applied to her neck with her consent and that went wrong, that is not murder.

“Death through this mechanism may thankfully be rare but it does happen and sadly it happened here.”

Mr Mansfield said the defendant admits Grace died from pressure he placed on her neck but said expert evidence was consistent with his account that it was consensual, not violent.

In a police interview, the trial heard last week, he said he only realised Grace was dead when he found her lying on the floor but admits then cramming her body into a suitcase which he buried in a shallow grave in the woods.

Mr Mansfield said his failure to call for help, disposal of Grace’s body and lies to police were due to panic.

“He may have thought he wouldn’t be believed,” Mr Mansfield told the jury, “but don’t prove him right.”

Grace Millane's parents David and Gillian arrive at Auckland High Court
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Grace Millane’s parents David and Gillian have been at the trial in Auckland

The court also heard that Miss Millane had drunk so much that night that her heart may have gone into a “terminal tailspin” when she was choked during sex.

Pathologist Dr Fintan Garavan, appearing as a defence witness, told the jury a combination of obstruction of the blood flow, pressure on her nervous system and being drunk meant she might have died quickly.

There were no signs of her having struggled and her plight “would not be obvious to a person nearby unless you know what you are looking for,” he said.

Defence barrister Ian Brookie said Miss Millane had drunk four mango cocktails, one tequila shot, two whisky cocktails herself and shared three half litre jugs of margheritas and sangria with her alleged killer during their night out.

Dr Garavan said the alcohol, in conjunction with the choking, was “an iceberg making its way into the shipping lane”.

“It very likely has become an important indirect player in causing death,” he said, explaining that being drunk could turn off a “safety valve” which would normally trigger someone to fight for breath.

Dr Garavan, who examined hundreds of photographs of Grace’s body, agreed the primary cause of death was asphyxiation, which he said would have required just one kilogram of pressure.

But he said the absence of deeper haemorrhages in the neck muscles, fractures or scratches to the skin “would favour consensual” choking.

The trial continues.

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