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Tokyo area shuts down as powerful typhoon lashes Japan

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A heavy downpour and strong winds pounded Tokyo and surrounding areas on Saturday as a powerful typhoon forecast to be Japan’s worst in six decades made landfall and passed over the capital, where streets, nearby beaches and train stations were long deserted.

Store shelves were bare after people stocked up on water and food ahead of Typhoon Hagibis. The Japan Meteorological Agency warned of dangerously heavy rainfall in Tokyo and surrounding prefectures, including Gunma, Saitama and Kanagawa, and later expanded the area to include Fukushima and Miyagi to the north. A coastal earthquake also rattled the area.

“Be ready for rainfall of the kind that you have never experienced,” said meteorological agency official Yasushi Kajihara, adding that areas usually safe from disasters may prove vulnerable.

“Take all measures necessary to save your life,” he said.

Kajihara said people who live near rivers should take shelter on the second floor or higher of any sturdy building if an officially designated evacuation center wasn’t easily accessible.

Hagibis, which means “speed” in Filipino, was advancing north-northwestward with maximum sustained winds of 144 kilometers (90 miles) per hour, according to the meteorological agency. It was traveling northward at a speed of 40 kph (25 mph).

It reached Kawasaki, a western part of greater Tokyo, late Saturday and headed to Tsukuba city to the north about an hour later, before it was expected to swerve toward the sea, the agency said.

The storm brought heavy rainfall in wide areas of Japan all day ahead of its landfall, including in Shizuoka and Mie prefectures, southwest of Tokyo, as well as Chiba to the north, which saw power outages and damaged homes in a typhoon last month.

Under gloomy skies, a tornado ripped through Chiba on Saturday, overturning a car in the city of Ichihara and killing a man inside the vehicle, city official Tatsuya Sakamaki said. Five people were injured when the tornado ripped through a house. Their injuries were not life-threatening, Sakamaki said.

The heavy rain caused rivers to swell, and several had flooded by late Saturday. The wind flipped anchored boats and whipped up sea waters in a dangerous surge along the coast and areas near rivers, flooding some residential neighborhoods and leaving people to wade in ankle-deep waters and cars floating. Some roads were so flooded they looked like muddy ditches.

An earthquake shook the area drenched by the rainfall shortly before the typhoon made landfall in Shizuoka prefecture Saturday evening. but there were no immediate reports of damage. The U.S. Geological Survey said the magnitude 5.3 quake was centered in the ocean off the coast of Chiba, near Tokyo, and was fairly deep, at 59.5 kilometers (37 miles). Deep quakes tend to cause less damage than shallow ones.

In Shizuoka, one of two men who went missing in the Nishikawa River was rescued, Gotemba city official Fumihiko Katsumata said. Firefighters said the two men were working at a river canal to try to control overflowing when they were swept away.

The nationally circulated Yomiuri newspaper put the storm’s casualty toll at two people dead, three missing and 62 injured. More than 170,000 people had evacuated, the paper said.

More than 370,000 homes suffered power outages as a result of the typhoon, according to Tokyo Electric Power Co.

Yusuke Ikegaya, a Shizuoka resident who evacuated ahead of the storm, said he was surprised that the nearby river was about to overflow in the morning, hours before the typhoon made landfall.

“In the 28 years of my life, this is the first time I’ve had to evacuate even before a typhoon has landed,” he said.

Authorities also warned of mudslides, common in mountainous Japan.

Two dams began to release some of their waters and other dams in the area may take similar measures, as waters were nearing limits, public broadcaster NHK reported. An overflooded dam is likely to cause greater damage, and so releasing some water gradually is a standard emergency measure, but the released water added to the heavy rainfall could be dangerous, causing rivers to flood.

Rugby World Cup matches, concerts and other events in the typhoon’s path were canceled, while flights were grounded and train services halted. Authorities acted quickly, with warnings issued earlier in the week, including urging people to stay indoors.

Some 17,000 police and military troops were called up, standing ready for rescue operations.

Residents taped up their apartment windows to prevent them from shattering. TV talks shows showed footage of household items like a slipper bashing through glass when hurled by winds.

Evacuation centers were set up in coastal towns, and people rested on gymnasium floors, saying they hoped their homes were still there after the storm passed.

The typhoon disrupted a three-day weekend in Japan that includes Sports Day on Monday. Qualifying for a Formula One auto race in Suzuka was pushed to Sunday. The Defense Ministry cut a three-day annual navy review to a single day on Monday.

All Nippon Airways and Japan Airlines grounded most domestic and international flights at the Tokyo, Osaka and Nagoya airports, and some Sunday flights have also been canceled.

Central Japan Railway Co. canceled bullet-train service between Tokyo and Osaka except for several early Saturday trains connecting Nagoya and Osaka. Tokyo Disneyland was closed, while Ginza department stores and smaller shops throughout Tokyo were shuttered.

A typhoon that hit the Tokyo region in 1958 left more than 1,200 people dead and half a million houses flooded.

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Hacked Disney Plus accounts said to be on sale, according to reports

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In this photo illustration, the Disney + logo is displayed on the screen of an Apple MacBook Pro computer on November 08, 2019 in Paris, France.

Chesnot | Getty Images

Thousands of Disney+ user accounts have been stolen by hackers and put up for sale on the dark web, according to multiple reports.

Disney+ is the new subscription-based streaming service from Disney that was officially launched last Tuesday.

Just hours after the service was rolled out, hackers hijacked user accounts and were either offering them for free on hacking forums or selling them for prices between $3 to $11, according to investigations by news site ZDNet.

Users said hackers were accessing their Disney+ accounts, logging them out of their devices and then changing the email and password associated with that account, according to ZDNet.

The BBC also reported that it found hacked customer accounts for sale on the dark web.

A spokesperson for Disney told CNBC the company “takes the privacy and security of our users’ data very seriously and there is no indication of a security breach on Disney+.”

It is likely that some users may have used the same email and password for multiple sites, including Disney+, and their credentials could’ve been stolen during previous security breaches at other companies.

But, ZDNet reported users who have used unique passwords also had their accounts compromised.

Disney+ is currently available in a few selected countries including the United States and Canada. It touts an expansive library of content from Disney shows and movies, Pixar, Marvel, Lucasfilm as well as new original shows being produced for the service, such as the “Star Wars” spin-off series “The Mandalorian.”

It is the latest addition in an increasingly crowded streaming landscape, with the likes of Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime, and others.

Read ZDNet’s full investigation about stolen Disney+ accounts here.

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A.I. helps in early detection of ovarian cancer, says CEO of health tech firm

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Artificial Intelligence (AI) is helping oncologists in the U.K. detect ovarian cancer in patients much earlier than was previously possible, according to the CEO of TPP, a company that provides health-care related software to doctors and nurses.

“So, our AI can now spot (ovarian cancer) in more than 50% of cases up to two years before the doctor,” Frank Hester told CNBC’s Christine Tan at the East Tech West conference in the Nansha district of Guangzhou, China. “The average doctor in a 40-year career sees four or five cases of ovarian cancer.”

By the time a woman finds out she has ovarian cancer, it is usually too late, but late detection can now be eliminated thanks to advancement in health care technology, according to Hester, whose company works with the U.K.’s National Health Service (NHS) which provides majority of health care in England.

TPP has access to more than 50 million medical records of NHS patients. Using that data, the company has built AI programs and the first of it focuses on early detection of ovarian cancer, Hester said.

The Horsforth-based company shares patients’ medical records electronically with doctors and nurses, Hester said, highlighting that they have checks and balances in place to cover for cyber security breaches.

“We pay companies to attack us every year. We actually pay… in every country that we’re working in,” Hester said, referring to ethical hackers — sometimes called “white hats” — who are hired by companies to help boost their defenses against hackers and keep their networks secure.

Countries around the world are relying on digital medical records of patients and using AI in health care for early detection and accuracy of diagnosis, or for administrative tasks such as scheduling patients appointments and staffing tasks, according to a global study done in Singapore by Royal Philips’ annual Future Health Index.

According to the study, health care professionals in China are significantly more likely to recommend patients use digital health technology or mobile health apps to track key health indicators.

“China is absolutely leading the world in AI,” said Hester. “I’ve seen a change over the past 5 years… it’s almost the policy now to do business with foreigners, which is great,” Hester said.

TPP’s health care technology has been used in China since 2013, he added.

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US, China could sign phase one trade deal before Christmas, Pimco says

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John Studzinski, managing director and vice chairman of Pimco, speaks with CNBC’s Geoff at the East Tech West conference in Nansha, Guangzhou.

Dave Zhong | Getty Images for CNBC

A “phase one” trade deal between the U.S. and China could be finalized and signed before Christmas this year, according to an executive from bond investment giant Pimco.

Optimism that such an agreement could be reached between the two countries faded in recent days following reports that Washington and Beijing remained far apart on several issues. A Chinese government source told CNBC’s Eunice Yoon on Monday that China is troubled after U.S. President Donald Trump said he hasn’t agreed to roll back tariffs.

But John Studzinski, managing director and vice chairman of Pimco, said on Tuesday that he still thinks the two sides would reach a partial deal.

“There are obviously issues remaining about agricultural purchase targets, forced technology (transfer) and broader enforcement issues. But I think the view would be to try to resolve something … by the beginning of December and sign it before Christmas,” he told CNBC’s Geoff Cutmore at the East Tech West conference in the Nansha district of Guangzhou city, China.

“And I think Trump sees this as important. He’s gotten a lot of endorsement from American CEOs who want to see some type of stabilization and anchor in this broader relationship and trade dialogue between China and America,” he added.

US and China are ‘complementary’

The two largest economies in the world are in the second year of a trade war that has hurt investor and business sentiment, and slowed down global economic activity. Both the U.S. and China have slapped tariffs worth billions of dollars on each other’s products — with potentially more to come if talks between them break down.

But reaching a “phase one” deal will not resolve all issues between the two economic giants, noted Studzinski.

“Whether we like it or not, we are all witnessing a major event — the first major event, really — since World War II with the need for these two formidable cultures, countries, independent countries to rethink their relationship,” he said. “The world will be a much stronger and stable place if they can find ways to align their interests, rather than trying to compete.”

Studzinski explained that in many ways, the U.S. and China are “complementary.”

Citing the technology sector as an example, he said the U.S. has had three to four generations of Silicon Valley-trained technologists, while China has “fantastic” expertise and acumen to manufacture “very complicated” components. Those two areas of expertise would work well together to benefit economies worldwide, he added.

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