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Jamal Khashoggi’s final words revealed in consulate recordings | World News

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Jamal Khashoggi’s final words were a plea to his killers not to cover his mouth because he suffered from asthma and could suffocate, according to a report.

The Saudi journalist was killed and dismembered by a Saudi hit squad at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul on 2 October last year.

Mr Khashoggi, a Saudi dissident and US resident, had been visiting the consulate to obtain documents he needed to get married. He was killed soon after entering the building.

Recordings made before and during the killing were obtained by Turkish intelligence authorities and published on Monday by Turkish newspaper the Daily Sabah.

According to the report, in the moments before he was killed Mr Khashoggi had pleaded: “Don’t cover my mouth. I have asthma, don’t do it. You’ll suffocate me.”

Included in the transcript are gruesome discussions of how Mr Khashoggi would be killed and his body sawed into pieces.

Dr. Salah Muhammed al Tubaigy
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Dr Salah Muhammed Al-Tubaigy talked about how he would go about sawing Mr Khashoggi’s body

Minutes before the journalist arrived at the consulate, Dr Salah Muhammed Al-Tubaigy, the head of forensic evidence at the Saudi General Security Department, was recorded saying: “Actually, I’ve always worked on cadavers. I know how to cut very well. I have never worked on a warm body though, but I’ll also manage that easily.

“I normally put on my earphones and listen to music when I cut cadavers. In the meantime, I sip on my coffee and smoke.

“After I dismember it, you will wrap the parts into plastic bags, put them in suitcases and take them out.”

Jamal Khashoggi's fiancee Hatice Cengiz
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Jamal Khashoggi’s fiancee Hatice Cengiz

When Mr Khashoggi arrived at the consulate he was politely invited to an office on the second floor but he became suspicious and was pulled by the arm as he said: “Let me go, what do you think you’re doing?”

When Mr Khashoggi was in the room with his killers, Maher Mutreb, a senior Saudi intelligence officer and the bodyguard of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, told him he must be returned to the Saudi capital Riyadh.

Mutreb said: “Please sit. We have to take you back [to Riyadh]. There is an order from Interpol. Interpol demanded you be returned. We are here to take you.”

Mr Khashoggi responded: “There are no lawsuits against me. My fiancee is waiting outside for me.”

Later he was told to write a message to his son telling him not to worry if he is not heard from but he said: “I will write nothing”.

Surveillance camera footage of a man, previously seen with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman's entourage, outside the Saudi consul general's residence in Istanbul
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Surveillance footage of a man, reportedly Mutreb, at the consulate entrance

Mutreb was later heard saying: “Help us, so that we can help you. Because in the end, we will take you to Saudi Arabia and if you don’t help us, you know what will happen in the end.”

Mr Khashoggi said: “There is a towel here. Will you have me drugged?”

Mutreb replied: “We will put you to sleep.”

After Mr Khashoggi was drugged and suffocated, his body was cut into pieces, a process that lasted about 30 minutes in the recording.

Time Person of the Year
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Jamal Khashoggi was named Time Person of the Year

Some of the details were in a United Nations report on the murder, which was released in June.

The report blamed the Saudi state for the killing, saying that Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s possible role should also be examined.

Saudi Arabia had offered a number of different explanations for what had happened but eventually settled on blaming rogue officials during a brawl in the consulate.

Eleven people are being tried in private proceedings inside the kingdom.

Mr Khashoggi’s remains have never been found.

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More than 2,000 preserved foetal remains found at dead doctor’s home | World News

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More than 2,000 medically preserved foetal remains have been found at the home of a late Indiana abortion clinic doctor, leading to calls for a federal investigation.

The gruesome discovery was made after Dr Ulrich Klopfer died on 3 September and family members began sorting through his property in Illinois.

The county coroner’s office has taken possession of the 2,246 preserved remains.

State Republican Ron Bacon has called for the Indiana attorney general’s office to investigate the now-closed clinics in Fort Wayne, Gary and South Bend, where Klopfer had performed abortions.

He described the discovery as “seriously disturbing” and expressed concern that “there may be other remains”.

A spokeswoman for the Will County Sheriff’s Office said its investigation was ongoing and no further information would be released until it is complete.

She called it “a very sensitive situation” involving the sheriff’s department, coroner’s office and prosecutors.

Klopfer was believed to be Indiana’s most prolific abortion doctor, performing thousands of procedures over several decades.

His three clinics closed years before his death.

The state revoked the South Bend clinic’s licence in 2015 and the Indiana State Department of Health had previously issued complaints against the clinic, accusing it of lacking a patient register, policies regarding medical abortion, and a governing body to determine policies.

Klopfer’s licence was suspended by Indiana’s Medical Licensing Board in November 2016 after it found a number of violations, including a failure to ensure that qualified staff were present when patients received or recovered from medications given before and during abortion procedures.

He was no longer practising by that time, but told the panel he had never lost a patient in 43 years of doing abortions.

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Have scientists found a way to stop the common cold? | Science & Tech News

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Scientists believe they have found a way to stop the common cold – as well as a number of other potentially fatal viral diseases.

Researchers at Stanford University and the University of California-San Francisco discovered the best way to tackle them was temporarily disabling a single protein inside our own cells.

Colds are the world’s most common infectious illness and many are the result of rhinovirus infections which are mutation-prone and quick to develop resistance to drugs.

It is this problem that has led scientists to try host-directed therapy which would make our bodies difficult for certain viruses to survive in.

The US experts identified a component in human cells which the viruses were dependent on through gene-editing.

They discovered a number of viruses could not replicate in human cells lacking the enzyme SETD3.

The team created genetically modified mice that were unable to produce that enzyme which made them immune to viral infection.

Published in the journal Nature Microbiology, the findings showed despite lacking SETD3 the mice lived normal and healthy lives.

The technique also stopped viruses associated with asthma, encephalitis and polio developing.

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Saudi Arabia says ‘Iranian weapons’ used in drone attack on oil facilities | World News

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Oil prices have fallen after an initial spike following a drone attack on Saudi Arabia’s oil facilities, as finger pointing continues over who was responsible.

Global prices surged nearly 20% following the bombing of two oil plants, before dropping around 10% when markets calmed in reaction to Donald Trump’s suggestion that America’s stockpile could be used if required.

Yemen’s Houthi rebels, who are backed by Iran, say they are responsible and have warned of more strikes.

Smoke billows from the oil facility in Abqaiq
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Satellite images showed smoke billowing from the Abqaiq oil facility

However, Saudi Arabia and the US have accused Iran of being behind the attacks on the Abqaiq facility and the Khurais oil field in the early hours of Saturday.

Saudi military spokesman Colonel Turki al-Malki said their initial investigation suggests “Iranian weapons” were used and were “not launched from Yemen”.

His comments were echoed by the US ambassador to the United Nations, who told the security council that information “indicates that responsibility lies with Iran” and there was no evidence the attack came from Yemen.

Iran has denied it is to blame and said it was ready for “full-fledged war” if necessary, while countries including Russia have warned against pinning the blame on Tehran.

Colonel Turki al-Malki said the weapons were Iranian
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Colonel Turki al-Malki claimed the weapons were Iranian

It comes as Iranian news agency INSA also reported that the country’s Revolutionary Guards had seized a ship in the Gulf for allegedly smuggling diesel to the United Arab Emirates.

Iran and Saudi Arabia are locked in a long-standing power struggle in the region.

A satellite image showing damage to oil/gas Saudi Aramco infrastructure at Abqaiq, in Saudi Arabia
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A satellite image shows damage to the Abqaiq plant in the east of Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia is leading a coalition, which includes the UAE, in a war against the Houthi rebels in Yemen. It is often described as a proxy war between Saudi Arabia and Iran.

The strike on Saudi Aramco’s main processing facility has cut its production of crude oil by 5.7 million barrels a day – more than half its daily exports and more than 5% of the world’s daily production.

The oil market’s confidence was knocked by how easy it appeared to be to attack and damage the Saudi facilities.

Khurais oil plant
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The Khurais oil plant was also hit

It remains unclear how long it will take to carry out repairs, with some suggesting it could take months.

The country has stockpiles that will enable it to meet its export commitments in coming weeks. However it took some action to clamp down on supplies, including shutting down its pipeline to Bahrain.

US President Donald Trump helped calm markets when he said oil from America’s emergency fuel storage would be released if needed.

He tweeted: “We don’t need Middle Eastern Oil & Gas, & in fact have very few tankers there, but will help our Allies!”

He also said the US was “locked and loaded” and that he is unwilling to meet Iran, who he re-imposed sanctions on last year after pulling out of a landmark nuclear deal.

The president went on to accuse Iran of lying over its involvement, tweeting: “Remember when Iran shot down a drone, saying knowingly that it was in their ‘airspace’ when, in fact, it was nowhere close.

“They stuck strongly to that story knowing that it was a very big lie.

“Now they say that they had nothing to do with the attack on Saudi Arabia. We’ll see?”

Senior US officials said satellite images and other intelligence showed the strike was inconsistent with one launched from Yemen, where the Houthis are based, and suggested instead that it came from Iran or Iraq.

Iraq has denied the attack originated from their territory.

Dominic Raab, the UK foreign secretary, told Sky News: “The attack on the installations was a wanton violation of international law.

“It’s despicable and we stand firmly in support of our Saudi partners and other international players who are outraged.

“The picture is not entirely clear, we are working it up, and before I talk about who is responsible and the implications I want to have a very clear picture, which we will be getting shortly.”

Russia’s foreign ministry expressed “grave concern” and said it condemned attacks on vital infrastructure or any action that could disrupt global energy supplies.

However, Moscow warned against putting the blame on Iran and said military retaliation would be unacceptable.

Saudi neighbour Qatar also condemned the attacks, despite being on the receiving end of a Saudi boycott.



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