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Democrats won big in 2018 — so where’s the beef?

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By Chuck Todd, Mark Murray and Carrie Dann

WASHINGTON — House Democrats have been in control of the House of Representatives for five months now, and they don’t have much to show for it.

That message is the thrust of a Tom Steyer-backed TV ad that’s airing in Iowa and New Hampshire, as well as on national cable.

“You told us to wait for the Mueller investigation. And when he showed obstruction of justice … nothing happened,” the ad goes.

“When this president took money from foreign governments and blocked the release of his tax returns … nothing happened.”

“Now you tell us to wait for the next election? Really??”

The lack of deliverables for House Democrats goes beyond oversight and the Mueller report.

HR1 – the campaign-finance and ethics bill that they passed in March? Not going anywhere in the Senate.

President Trump’s immigration rollout from yesterday? It almost pretended Dems don’t control the House.

And Attorney General William Barr’s joke to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Wednesday? “Madam Speaker, did you bring your handcuffs?”

To be sure, Democrats in control of the House allowed them to roll over Trump during the government shutdown (remember that?). It enabled Michael Cohen’s testimony back in February? And it’s doubtful that Robert Mueller testifying would even be a possibility if the GOP remained in charge of the House.

Still, the voices in the Steyer ad aren’t the only ones questioning how House Democrats have used their powers, especially after the release of the Mueller report.

“[Trump’s] defying you. He’s laughing at you. And he’s getting away with it.”

Running interference?

A new court filing by Robert Mueller’s team reveals that former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn told investigators that figures linked to the Trump administration and Congress reached out to him to interfere in the Russia probe, per NBC News.

From the court papers: “The defendant informed the government of multiple instances, both before and after his guilty plea, where either he or his attorneys received communications from persons connected to the Administration or Congress that could’ve affected both his willingness to cooperate and the completeness of that cooperation.”

2020 Vision: “Not that there’s anything wrong with that”

In an interview with Fox News yesterday, Trump pretty much pulled a Jerry Seinfeld in talking about Pete Buttigieg’s gay marriage.

“President Trump said ‘some people’ may have a problem with Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg’s marriage to his husband, Chasten, but he thinks ‘it’s absolutely fine,’ ‘great’ and “good,’” the Washington Post writes.

On the campaign trail

Today: Pete Buttigieg, Steve Bullock and Bill de Blasio all campaign in Iowa… Bernie Sanders holds rallies in North Carolina…. And Julian Castro stumps in California.

Saturday: Joe Biden holds a rally in Philadelphia… Buttigieg and Bullock remain in the Hawkeye State – and Michael Bennet joins them… Jay Inslee, Amy Klobuchar and Elizabeth Warren hit New Hampshire… And Bernie Sanders visits South Carolina and Georgia.

Sunday: Warren, Klobuchar and Seth Moulton are in New Hampshire… Sanders has a rally in Alabama… And Buttigieg makes an appearance in a Fox News townhall.

Data Download: The number of the day is … $434 million.

$434 million.

That’s the total revenue (at least) that President Trump saw last year, according to a financial disclosure report made public yesterday.

The figure includes a drop of about $3 million in revenue from his Mar-a-Lago resort compared with 2017, but an increase of about $1.4 million from his Doral property and a slight bump in income from his hotel in D.C.

Tweet of the day

The Lid: Location, location, location

Don’t miss the pod from yesterday, when we looked at whether voters are paying attention to candidates’ home state electoral records.

ICYMI: New clips you shouldn’t miss

Some experts are wary that Trump’s plan for a civics test as a requirement for new immigrants could backfire.

The Iran tensions are straining the relationship between John Bolton and Mike Pompeo, POLITICO reports.

The voter registration database of a small Trump-backing county in the Florida panhandle was breached by Russian hackers.

And the president has some very specific asks for the border wall’s design.

Other news that’s out there…

Trump agenda: Take the money and run

The Trump administration has pulled $1 billion from a California rail project.

Trump’s judicial nominees are refusing to endorse Brown v. Board when they’re under Senate questioning.

Trump is trying to pump the brakes with the Pentagon on the brewing conflict with Iran.

A provision in the new tax law is hitting college scholarships.

2020: Rocky rollout

Bill de Blasio’s presidential rollout didn’t go as smoothly as he probably hoped.

Here’s the New York Times on “how Bernie Sanders brought the Cold War to Burlington.”

The AP has the latest on Roy Moore’s flirtation with another Senate run.



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DNC announces debate qualification threshold for South Carolina

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WASHINGTON — To qualify for the Democratic debate stage in South Carolina, candidates will need to have won at least one delegate in earlier primary contests or cross a polling threshold of 10 percent nationally in four polls or 12 percent in two polls in the Palmetto State, the Democratic National Committee announced Saturday.

The rules are barely changed from the qualification threshold the party set for next week’s debate in Las Vegas, hosted by NBC News and MSNBC. Those qualifications could help former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s make his first appearance on the stage.

Democratic presidential candidates Pete Buttigieg, Bernie Sanders, Joe Biden and Elizabeth Warren gather onstage before the start of the debate at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, N.H., on Feb. 7, 2020.Brendan McDermid / Reuters file

Candidates who won at least one delegate to the Democratic National Convention in either the New Hampshire and Iowa contests, or next Saturday’s caucuses in Nevada, will automatically qualify for the Feb. 25 debate in Charleston, which is hosted by CBS News and comes just before the state’s Feb. 29 primary.

According to the new thresholds, five candidates have already qualified for the debate stage: Former Vice President Joe Biden, former South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and Mass. Sen. Elizabeth Warren. 

Bloomberg, who skipped the first four early state contests, has not received a delegate yet and isn’t expected to receive on during next week’s Nevada caucuses. However, he has been polling above 10 percent in some recent surveys. He still needs one qualifying poll to make the Las Vegas debate stage.

The window to qualify next week’s Feb. 19 debate closes the night before the event, while the window to qualify for the South Carolina debate runs from Feb. 4, the day after the Iowa Caucuses, to Feb. 24, the day before the debate.

Bill de Blasio endorses Bernie Sanders in presidential bid

WASHINGTON — New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio endorsed Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders for president on Friday.

“I am standing with Bernie because he stands with working families, and always has,” de Blasio said in a statement. “New Yorkers know all too well the damage caused by Donald Trump’s xenophobia, bigotry and recklessness, and Bernie is the candidate to take him on and take him down.”

de Blasio continued, “I have called for a bold, progressive agenda, and that’s exactly what Senator Sanders has championed for decades. I am proud to endorse a true progressive leader who will fight for working New Yorkers and families across the country.”

The endorsement comes after Sanders won the New Hampshire primary, and placed a strong second place in the Iowa caucuses. It also comes as former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg gains national traction in several polls, and just needs one more qualifying poll to make the debate stage in Nevada. 

Bloomberg and de Blasio have had a fraught relationship since de Blasio ran for mayor. In 2014, when addressing reporters after the death of Eric Garner, de Blasio made reference to Bloomberg’s stop-and-frisk policy, “Because for much of the previous 12 years, there was a growing tension and a growing disconnect between police and community all over our city. And that is not an acceptable state of affairs,” de Blasio said at the time. 

And when Bloomberg entered the presidential race in November, de Blasio said his mayoral tenure has been undoing Bloomberg’s policies. 

“This is a guy who really reinforced the status quo every chance he got in New York City,” de Blasio said in a ‘The Young Turks’ interview. “And I have spent literally six years undoing what Michael Bloomberg did.” 

de Blasio ended his nearly four month presidential bid in September. He is one of a few former presidential contenders in this cycle to endorse in the primary: Former Housing and Urban Development Sec. Julián Castro for Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Mass. Rep. Seth Moulton and Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan for former Vice President Joe Biden, and Joe Sestak for Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar.

Amy Klobuchar launches ad campaign in South Carolina

COLUMBIA, S.C. — Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar will capitalize on her campaign’s momentum from New Hampshire in South Carolina as she launches her first broadcast television advertisement in the state two weeks before the “First in the South” primary.

The six-figure statewide ad buy, which will also be featured on cable and digital platforms, begins with a moment from the New Hampshire Democratic debate in which Klobuchar sharply criticized President Trump. 

“There is a complete lack of empathy in the guy in the White House right now,” Klobuchar said. “And I will bring that to you.” 

The ad features a montage of Klobuchar interacting with voters and American workers — and highlights her endorsement from The New York Times back in January, shared with Sen. Elizabeth Warren. 

“If you have trouble stretching your paycheck to pay for that rent, I know you and I will fight for you,” Klobuchar continues in the ad. “If you have trouble deciding if you’re going to pay for your child care or your long term care, I know you and I will fight for you. I would love your vote, and I would love the vote of America.”   

The campaign’s new ad buy comes after Klobuchar’s strong performance in the New Hampshire primary, where she placed third behind Sen. Bernie Sanders and former South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete Buttigieg. In the roughly 12 hours after the polls closed in the state, Klobuchar raised over $2.5 million from supporters —boosting the campaign’s resources to make targeted outreach efforts in both Nevada and South Carolina. 

The ad buy also comes as Klobuchar continues to trail the other leading contenders in South Carolina, and among voters of color. South Carolina’s primary will take place on Feb. 29.  

Biden puts gun control front and center in new ads

WASHINGTON — Former Vice President Joe Biden will put his career accomplishments on gun safety issues front and center as he kicks off a make-or-break stretch for his candidacy in Nevada, sharpening a contrast with one rival and heading off a similar push from another.

The Biden campaign is launching a pair of new ads on broadcast television in Nevada that amplify Biden’s argument that he is the only Democrat running or president who has taken on the gun lobby and won.

The first ad begins with the names Newtown, Parkland and Las Vegas — communities that saw some of the most horrific mass shootings in the past decade to note that gun violence “is tearing at the soul of this nation.” The ad details Biden’s work on the Brady Bill and assault weapons ban, and vows that Biden “will beat the NRA again” as president.

The second ad features a montage of Biden interacting with children on the campaign trail, saying that while they may not know his record on the issue in detail, “They just need to know protecting them from gun violence is what Joe Biden cares about most.”

The push comes on the second anniversary of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School massacre in Parkland, Fla. that took 17 lives. The shooting in Parkland followed just months after the murder of 59 concert-goers on the Las Vegas strip by a lone gunman.

In a statement marking the Parkland anniversary, Biden blamed the lack of any meaningful national gun reforms since then on “cowardice — political cowardice from the very people who should be fighting the hardest to protect us but instead are picking the side of gun manufacturers and the National Rifle Association.”

The statement is an implicit swipe at Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders. At the Democratic debate in New Hampshire, Biden called Sanders’ vote to shield gun manufacturers from liability “the biggest mistake” of his career. Sanders noted in the debate that he now has a D- rating from the NRA, and that “the world has changed and my views have changed” on the issue.

While the issue was not one that moved New Hampshire voters, the Biden campaign sees gun safety reform as a significant one for Nevada voters, who recently supported a ballot initiative to strengthen background checks. In addition to the new seven-figure TV buy, Biden is expected to discuss gun issues in his first public event since Tuesday in Henderson, Nev. Friday night.   

Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who helped bankroll a major gun safety push in the 2018 midterms, has also showcased his record on guns in his national advertising blitz. Bloomberg, though, is not competing in the Nevada caucuses.  

Buttigieg is relying on grassroots movement in California

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — With just 18 days until the California primary on Super Tuesday, former South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete Buttigieg is heavily relying on momentum and a “badass grassroots organizing program,” as one aide called it, to build support in the state.

But Buttigieg has yet to spend any dollars on TV ads in the state, while former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders have blanketed the airwaves, despite having raised more than $80 million over the last year. Instead, the campaign contends it has fortified a volunteer network throughout each of the state’s congressional districts and is now actively moving more organizing staff into the state to help mobilize those volunteer operations.

He does not have a single endorsement from any one of California’s 45 Democratic members of Congress. Sen. Dianne Feinstein backed former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Kamala Harris has yet to weigh in since her own exit from the presidential race. The state’s Lieutenant Governor Eleni Kounalakis announced her endorsement of Buttigieg on Thursday ahead of his Sacramento town hall on Friday. 

Pete Buttigieg speaks at a Get Out the Vote rally at Elm Street Middle School on Feb. 9, 2020 in Nashua, N.H.Win McNamee / Getty Images

Prior to the Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire primary, campaign officials dismissed the need to have invested in a robust staff in California or other Super Tuesday states, suggesting, instead, that they would utilize campaign resources on ad buys and rely on the momentum that they’d garner from strong showings in the early states. 

Last September, the Buttigieg campaign secured 2016 Democratic nominee Sec. Hillary Clinton’s 2016 California state director to play the same role for its own Golden State effort. Because California awards its delegates on a proportional basis, the strategic targeting of the millions of Californians will be key, but more difficult, with the vastness of the state — more than 10 media markets and 53 congressional districts.

On Super Tuesday, the state will proportionally award its 416 delegates, with 273 of its delegates determined by results in each congressional district — dividing delegates proportionally among each candidate based on the outcome in that district. The other 144 delegates will be apportioned proportionally based on candidates’ statewide performance. 

California will then send 54 additional delegates — also known as automatic delegates — to the convention. These delegates, mostly party leaders and elected officials, are not required to vote for any one particular candidate, and they will only be able to vote at the convention should the nominating process head to a contested convention and a second ballot vote is required.

In California, voters can register and change party affiliation on Election Day at their polling place, which prompts a potential increase in more moderate and conservative voters to take part in the Democratic primary process. There are more than 9 million registered Democrats in California, and an additional 5.2 million Independent voters. While Buttigieg focused heavily on rural counties in Iowa, he will also likely need to rely on burgeoning support from the more affluent, college-educated voters of California, including from parts of Orange County and San Diego. 

But the Buttigieg campaign hopes that their good showings in Iowa and N.H. will impact the early vote in California — California counties began mailing voters their mail-in ballots on the day of the Iowa contest.

California will also, however, require that he expand his support among voters of color. 

The Public Policy Institute of California, a nonpartisan public policy research center in the state, reported last year that its survey of the state’s electorate showed that about half of likely Democratic voters are white, while Latinos form 24 percent of the party’s electorate, Asian-Americans account for 12 percent and African-American voters make up 10 percent. Buttigieg has suffered to build support outside of his mostly white coalition.

Buttigieg has made few stops in California open to the public — instead heavily fundraising in the state. He has raised more than 20 percent of his money from donors in California, per The Center for Responsive Politics

And it doesn’t seem Buttigieg is changing that plan. With limited time left ahead of March 3, Buttigieg will make two more California private fundraising stops on Friday in the greater Bay Area.

Bloomberg catches up to Warren in congressional endorsements

WASHINGTON — Less than three months since he declared his 2020 candidacy, Michael Bloomberg is tied in major endorsements with Senator Elizabeth Warren, who officially joined the presidential race over a year ago. 

In an NBC News tally of endorsements from members of Congress and governors, both Bloomberg and Warren have a total of 14 endorsements. The two are tied for second place behind Joe Biden with 47 and ahead of Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., with just eight.

Mike Bloomberg speaks at a campaign event in Raleigh, N.C., on Feb. 13, 2020.Jonathan Drake / Reuters

Bloomberg, who has yet to participate in a Democratic debate or be on the ballot in Iowa or New Hampshire, has seen a recent surge in endorsements allowing him to tie with the Massachusetts senator.

Warren had a weaker than anticipated performance in the two early states, placing third in the Iowa Caucus and failing to earn any delegates in New Hampshire. 

Since the first-in-the-nation primary on Tuesday, Bloomberg has racked up four endorsements, totaling eight this month. Notably, two Congressional Black Caucus members — Democratic Reps. Lucy McBath of Georgia and Gregory Meeks of New York — voiced their support for Bloomberg this week. 

Warren on the other hand, hasn’t received an endorsement from a member of Congress since Rep. Joaquin Castro, TX-20, formally backed her on January 14. Before that, the last time Warren was endorsed was July, 2019. 

Warren’s endorsements stem from her home state and some of the most progressive members of Congress. While she has no gubernatorial endorsements, her fellow Massachusetts Senate Democrat, Ed Markey, supports her candidacy.

Bloomberg has yet to receive the formal backing of any senator but is endorsed by Rhode Island’s Democratic Governor Gina Raimondo. He has also garnered the support of moderate Democratic House members serving in former Trump districts like Rep. Max Rose in New York and Rep. Mikie Sherrill in New Jersey.

Tom Steyer’s wife moves to South Carolina ahead of primary

WASHINGTON — The wife of presidential candidate and entrepreneur, Tom Steyer, moved to South Carolina this weekend to campaign for her husband ahead of the upcoming primary in the state on February 29. 

Kat Taylor resigned from her position as the CEO of a California-based bank and relocated to South Carolina where she’s renting a house for the remainder of Steyer’s 2020 campaign. Taylor will also hit the trail in Super Tuesday states.

Tom Steyer participates in the sixth Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign season in Los Angeles on Dec. 19, 2019.Frederic J. Brown / AFP – Getty Images file

“I’ve always been in support of my husband, because of that I came to Columbia to show my full support,” Taylor said in a statement to the Associated Press on Tuesday.

Taylor said that when the two took their wedding vows, they “made a commitment to leave everything on the table in a fight for a better world.”

Tiffiany Vaughn Jones, Steyer’s South Carolina Communications Director, told NBC News Wednesday that Taylor wants to take on a more active role in the campaign. The two plan to focus on improving both air and water quality, increasing access to affordable health care and housing, generating jobs, and creating a better future for young voters while on the trail. 

Vaughn Jones said that the 2020 race is clearly “wide open and the primary is now shifting to states that dramatically favor our campaign.”

“Our continued surge in South Carolina and Nevada demonstrates that Tom is the only candidate who is building the diverse coalition that will beat Donald Trump in November,” she said. 

South Carolina is widely considered the first diverse state of the primary cycle and a place where Democrats are competing to win over the black vote. The demographic makes up about two-thirds of the party’s electorate in the state.

Steyer has repeatedly emphasized throughout his time on the trail the importance of the minority vote, stating at Friday’s debate hosted by ABC News that, “We have not said one word tonight about race. Not one word.”

Taylor will also address racial issues while campaigning for her husband. She kicked off her time in South Carolina by hosting college students to discuss Steyer’s plans for increasing funding for historically black colleges and universities Tuesday afternoon.

Up to this point in his candidacy, Steyer surpasses the Democratic field in total spending, coming in second after Michael Bloomberg. In just the last seven months, he has spent $14 million on ads and recruited about 100 new staffers and additional volunteers in South Carolina alone. 

Other candidates like Sens. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., have argued that the billionaire is buying his way through the race.

Bloomberg gets endorsed by two CBC members

DES MOINES, Iowa — Stacey Plaskett, a Democratic representative to Congress from the U.S. Virgin Islands and member of the Congressional Black Caucus, and Rep. Lucy McBath, D-Ga., are endorsing former Michael Bloomberg’s presidential campaign.  

Plaskett, who had backed Sen. Kamala Harris until the California senator ended her White House bid, says she is backing Bloomberg in order to “bring the fight to Donald Trump.” 

Michael Bloomberg speaks at a campaign event on Feb. 5, 2020, in Providence, R.I.David Goldman / AP file

Plaskett worked with Bloomberg after Superstorm Sandy hit the U.S. Virgin Islands in 2012, and said in a statement that the former New York City mayor “not only has the policies to bring equality and wealth creation to communities of color and economic development to keep us competitive in the world, he’s not afraid to fight.”  

McBath cited Bloomberg’s “unmatched record in gun violence prevention” as a primary reason for her decision.  “Nobody running for president has done more for the gun violence prevention movement than Mike,” she said in a statement. “I am proud to stand with him in this race, and work with him when he is in the White House to keep our communities safe.”

This comes after a new national Quinnipiac poll showed Bloomberg with the support of 22 percent of black Democratic primary voters, eating away at former Vice President Joe Biden’s support among the demographic. Shortly after that poll was released, video and audio clips resurfaced online in which Bloomberg defends his controversial “Stop and Frisk” policy during his time as mayor, clips re-circulated by a supporter of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders. A Bloomberg official says the campaign was aware of at least one of the recordings and was braced for them to surface as a major issue at some point in the campaign. 

One of the recordings, verified by NBC News, is audio from a 2015 Aspen Institute appearance, in which Bloomberg said, “you can just Xerox [copy]” the description of male minorities aged 16-25 and hand it to police. He also said, “We put all the cops in the minority neighborhoods. Yes, that’s true. Why do you do it? Because that’s where all the crime is.” 

As the Trump campaign widely circulated the videos as well on Monday, Bloomberg spent the morning meeting with over 20 African American faith leaders in New York City. The leaders released a statement following the meeting, reading, “[Bloomberg] expressed regret over his past insensitivity regarding policies like stop and frisk and showed a continued interest in restorative justice. To be clear: None of us believe that Mike Bloomberg is a racist. Actions speak louder than words, and Mike has a long record of fighting for equality, civil rights, and criminal justice reform.”

Chants of ’46’ raise prospect of Donald Jr. as a dynasty builder

MANCHESTER, N.H. — While introducing the man who hopes to be Donald Trump’s successor in 2024 here Monday night, the president’s eldest son experienced something that had never happened before.

In-between touting his father’s accomplishments and slamming Democratic candidates, Donald Trump Jr. paused briefly to let a chant ricochet around the SNHU Arena: “46! 46! 46!”

It started out, seemingly organically and from just a few sections of the 11,000-person venue before it caught like wildfire. Moments later, Vice President Mike Pence took the stage and received huge applause from the crowd, but none as forward-looking as the acclaim Trump Jr. had just received.

Donald Trump Jr. speaks with his brother Eric and wife Lara, as well as his girlfriend Kimberly Guilfoyle in Des Moines, Iowa on Feb. 3, 2020.Jim Watson / AFP – Getty Images

And it didn’t just happen once. Later in the rally, as the president called members of his family up to the podium to the stage, thanking them for what they’ve “gone through” in recent years,” the audience again broke into the “46!” cheers.

“It was incredible,” Trump Jr. told NBC News outside a polling station in Derry on Tuesday. “I have not heard that one either. I had heard 2024 a couple times, but then it wasn’t like one guy in the front. It went pretty viral. And I’m sitting there like, ‘hey, let’s worry about 2020 first!’” 

Trump Jr. also told Fox News Tuesday that he found the crowd reaction “an incredible honor and very humbling” but maintained his “only focus” is this year’s race.

But while Trump supporters in New Hampshire were eager to cast their ballots for the incumbent on Tuesday, some also admitted they were already thinking about four years from now.

“He’s done a great job being his dad’s right-hand and he would definitely do a good job in his footsteps,” said Alexa Firman, owner of “Simply Delicious” bakery in Bedford, where Trump Jr. and his girlfriend — also a senior adviser to the campaign — Kimberly Guilfoyle stopped by unannounced on primary day. 

The couple also did retail stops in Iowa, in and around the caucuses there last week, and they said they plan to continue the kind of local politicking Trump himself rarely engages in.

The president’s other children are also quite involved in the re-elect effort. Eric and Lara Trump are part of the campaign, and son-in-law Jared Kushner is the main conduit between the White House and 2020 campaign manager Brad Parscale. Ivanka Trump has focused more on her administration role but she has vowed to stump for her father as the general election nears and even appeared with Pence at a few stops in the Granite State this week.

The prospects for a potential Trump dynasty got another boost in New Hampshire Tuesday, where early exit polls showed that those voting in the GOP primary there were overwhelmingly supportive of the president and said they had more allegiance to Donald Trump (54 percent) than the Republican Party (34 percent).

Nevada Democratic Party prepares for caucus after Iowa chaos

WASHINGTON — The Nevada Democratic Party released a memo to reporters Tuesday morning detailing the early voting process that will take place ahead of state’s caucuses next Saturday, February 22. 

“From the beginning, NV Dems’ priority has been to execute the most accessible, expansive, and transparent caucus yet,” Alana Mounce, Nevada State Democratic Party Executive Director, states in the memo originally sent to Nevada campaign staff Monday.

Supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden prepare to caucus for him in the gymnasium at Roosevelt High School, Feb. 3, 2020 in Des Moines, Iowa.Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

“That’s why we expanded upon Caucus Day to include four days of in-person early voting, multilingual training and caucus materials, and a robust training program for our nearly 3,000 volunteers,” she continues. 

Early voting will take place from February 15 through February 18 at over 80 locations throughout Nevada. Democrats can vote wherever they’d like in their respective counties as they are not assigned to specific precinct sites. 

If a voter is not a registered Democrat or must update their registration, they are able to do so at their early voting location.

Among the memo’s highlights are bullet points explaining that early voting will be conducted on paper ballots, which will then be transported to a secure location and scanned at the end of each early voting day. Voter check-in will be done on iPads available on-site. 

The votes however, will not be tabulated until Caucus Day. While campaigns will receive early vote data showing who has voted early, official presidential preferences will not go public until precinct caucuses have begun.

It is not yet clear how the Nevada Democratic Party will safely store voting information to avoid any sort of tampering though the memo states that the ballot transportation process to hubs will be tracked. 

“A clear chain of custody outlined on the ballot box —  from the time the ballot box leaves NV Dems HQ to the time it is dropped off at their designated hub — will be documented,” the memo reads. 

Mounce adds that Nevada Democrats have tested and “simplified the voting process” in order to “streamline information and to ensure we minimize errors.”

The announcement comes after the Iowa Democratic Party was controversially forced to delay releasing caucus results due to both technological errors and necessary corrections to the tallies. The Buttigieg and Sanders campaigns have both requested a partial recanvass in some of the Iowa Caucus precincts, arguing that their campaigns undeservedly suffered from discrepancies in the party’s official results. 

Most voters think President Trump will win reelection, new poll finds

MANCHESTER, N.H. — Two-thirds of voters believe that President Trump will be re-elected in November, according to a new Monmouth University poll released Tuesday. Of those, 27 percent said they think Trump will “definitely” be re-elected, while 39 percent said they feel he will “probably” win again.

The poll also finds that just 11 percent of registered Democrats say their party’s eventual nominee will “definitely” beat Trump, while 38 percent said “it is more likely than not” that President Trump will win. 

President Donald Trump arrives at a campaign rally on Feb. 10, 2020, in Manchester, N.H.Evan Vucci / AP

In the Democratic primary race, the poll shows a new front-runner, with Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders leading the field at 26 percent support among Democratic and lean-Democratic voters — up from 23 percent in the last national Monmouth University poll, taken before the Iowa caucuses. Former Vice President Joe Biden fell to 16 percent support in this poll — in January he was at 30 percent. 

And former South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete Buttigieg saw the biggest bump post-Iowa. In the new poll, Buttigieg rose to 13 percent, tied with Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren. In the previous Monmouth poll, Buttigieg’s support was at just 6 percent. 

The poll also finds former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg with 11 percent support nationally, making this his third qualifying poll, out of the four he needs, to make the Democratic debate stage in Nevada. Because Bloomberg will likely not receive a delegate from the New Hampshire race, where he is not on the ballot, Bloomberg’s only way to qualify will be through the polling thresholds

Democratic voters also raised concerns about the party’s nominating schedule. Twenty-six percent of Democratic voters said they felt that having Iowa and New Hampshire go first in the contest “makes it less likely” that the party will “nominate the best candidate for president.” And that’s the argument that some candidates, like Biden, are making on the morning of the New Hampshire primary contest. 



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Call their bluff, Boris! Brexiteer reveals the ONE WAY Britain can pull rug from under EU

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BORIS JOHNSON has been urged to abandon post-Brexit trade talks with the EU by Wetherspoon boss Tim Martin, who instead suggests the UK should leave on World Trade Organisation terms.

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Inside Trump’s week of rage and retribution

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WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump spent his first week post-impeachment asserting his dominance over the Department of Justice in a bid to exact revenge on his enemies and deliver rewards to his allies — the sudden, dramatic escalation of a long-running campaign to solidify his control over legal matters, and remove or sideline the remaining independent voices within his administration.

With the impeachment behind him, Trump’s advisers say there is little incentive for him to hold his fire. With few, if any, dissenting voices left in his orbit, aides and advisers have been cheering on his moves, saying he is ridding his administration of “snakes” and fighting back against a corrupt “deep state” — support that has emboldened Trump in the days since his Senate acquittal.

Trump’s tumultuous week included a vow to purge his administration of those challenging his policies; a renewal and redoubling of his attacks on his own Justice Department; a revival of long-standing grudges against those involved in the investigation of Russian efforts to contact and influence his 2016 campaign — and the public promise of more such moves to come.

Trump had Army Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, who testified in the House impeachment hearings, and Vindman’s brother, who wasn’t involved in the proceedings, escorted out of the White House less than 48 hours after his impeachment trial ended.

Disregarding the pleas of several GOP senators, Trump also fired Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, who also testified before the House.

The retribution drew widespread criticism from Democrats and even Trump’s former White House chief of staff John Kelly, but the president only seemed determined to keep dismissing dissenters. “DRAIN THE SWAMP! We want bad people out of our government!” he tweeted.

The president’s actions went beyond personnel moves. He publicly attacked prosecutors over their recommended sentence for his ally Roger Stone, who was found guilty of witness tampering and making false statements, a move that led to a chain of events that spread shock waves around the capital.

Hours after Trump tweeted that Stone’s recommended sentence represented “a horrible and very unfair situation,” senior Justice Department officials intervened to have the sentencing recommendation reduced, causing the four prosecutors involved in the case to resign in protest and prompting Democrats to call for Attorney General William Barr’s resignation.

The White House then formally withdrew the Treasury Department nomination of Jessie Liu, the former U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia, who had served as the top federal prosecutor overseeing the Stone case, among others, and was scheduled for a confirmation hearing Thursday in which her handling of the case could have come up. The White House did not provide an explanation for why the nomination was pulled.

When pressed by reporters, Trump declined to rule out a pardon for Stone.

The president’s ambitions to further solidify his reach and control over the Justice Department came into sharp relief with news that Barr was taking control of legal matters of interest to Trump.

The Friday announcement that the Justice Department was declining to prosecute one of Trump’s favorite villains in the Russia investigation, former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, came amid news it was also opening an inquiry into the case of the president’s former national security adviser Michael Flynn.

Trump was blindsided and angered by the decision on McCabe and wasn’t given a heads up by the Justice Department, said a person close to the president. That person said Trump believes his allies are unfairly punished for offenses that his adversaries have not been.

Barr chafed at the implication that he was doing the president’s bidding, telling ABC that Trump “has never asked me to do anything in a criminal case.”

But Trump himself ended the week by making it clear he felt free to make such a request. Barr’s statement, he tweeted, “doesn’t mean that I do not have, as President, the legal right to do so, I do, but I have so far chosen not to!”

Trump’s defiance seems to have buoyed aides along with the passing of the cloud of impeachment, and with the election still more than eight months away, there is little internal fear of political consequences for the current swirl of rage and retribution, campaign advisers said.

The president’s approval rating has hit the highest level of his presidency, at 49 percent, with 61 percent of Americans saying they are better off than they were four years ago — the latter statistic the highest recorded under an incumbent president in an election year — according to numbers released this month by Gallup.

His actions this week are unlikely to alter that dynamic, GOP pollster Bill McInturff of Public Opinion Strategies said. In the latest NBC/WSJ poll released this month, Trump had his strongest numbers since February 2017, right after his inauguration, with a higher approval rating, positivity score and enthusiasm about his candidacy, said McInturff, who conducted the survey along with Democratic pollster Jeff Horwitt of Hart Research Associates.

Meanwhile, Trump saw an ideal scenario playing out among his rivals competing for the Democratic nomination with a battle escalating between the establishment and the anti-establishment wings of the party.

“Voters’ economic optimism is helping the president,” McInturff said. “Post-Mueller, post-impeachment, it is hard to imagine what one week of news stories would do to immediately change these numbers.”

As the president looks to complete the purge of those outside the circle of trust, he is bringing back one of his most trusted advisers, Hope Hicks. He is also elevating his former body man John McEntee — who left the White House two years ago under a cloud — to oversee hiring across the administration, putting a loyalist in charge of stamping out dissent, according to a former White House official.

As the team around the president tightened still further to his most loyal staffers, carrying out his bidding with little visible pushback, he told reporters this week that he had learned a lesson from the impeachment — though perhaps not the one some Republican senators had suggested he might.

Trump’s takeaway from the process, he said Wednesday, was “that the Democrats are crooked.”

“They probably shouldn’t have brought impeachment,” he said.

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