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Mueller report: Donald Trump ‘tried to get ex-FBI chief fired’ during Russia investigation | US News

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Donald Trump has declared “Game Over” for his “haters” – but a long-awaited report revealed how the US president sought the firing of the man investigating his team’s alleged links to Russia.

A redacted 448-page report of special counsel Robert Mueller’s inquiry, published on Thursday, disclosed how Mr Trump urged an aide to instigate the sacking of Mr Mueller.

Mr Mueller’s 22 month-long work focused on Russian hacking and social media campaigns, possible Russian government links to – and contacts with – the Trump campaign, and potential obstruction of his investigatory efforts.

In June 2017 – a month after Mr Mueller’s appointment to probe possible cooperation between Mr Trump’s campaign and Moscow – the president attempted to remove Mr Mueller from his position, the report said.

The lengthy document described how Mr Trump called White House lawyer Don McGahn and told him to call then-attorney general Jeff Sessions to say Mr Mueller “had conflicts of interest and must be removed”.

“McGahn did not carry out the direction, however, deciding that he would resign rather than trigger what he regarded as a potential Saturday Night Massacre,” the report added, referencing the firing of key officials during former president Richard Nixon’s Watergate scandal.

Other explosive findings in Mr Mueller’s highly-anticipated report included:

:: Mr Trump’s belief that Mr Mueller’s appointment as a special counsel to investigate possible Russia links would “end” his spell in the White House. “Oh my God. This is terrible. This is the end of my presidency. I’m f****d,” Mr Trump said, according to the report.

:: There was “substantial evidence” that Mr Trump fired James Comey as FBI director in 2017 due to his “unwillingness to publicly state that the president was not personally under investigation”.

:: Written answers from Mr Trump to questions by Mr Mueller’s team were considered “inadequate”, but they decided against trying to compel Mr Trump to give evidence in person due to the likelihood of a long legal battle.

:: Mr Mueller did not exonerate the president on the question of whether he committed an obstruction of justice offence during the course of the investigation.

:: Mr Trump “launched public attacks on the investigation and individuals involved in it who could possess evidence adverse to the president, while in private, the president engaged in a series of targeted efforts to control the investigation”, the report said.

To cheers at a White House event following the release of Mr Mueller’s report, Mr Trump said he was having a “good day” and declared “no collusion, no obstruction”.

He added: “There never was, by the way, and there never will be.

“This should never happen to another president again, this hoax.”



The now published Mueller report examines ‘10 episodes’ of potential obstruction by president Trump.







‘This should never happen to a president again’

The president had earlier posted an image, inspired by TV series Game of Thrones, on Twitter with the same “no collusion, no obstruction” message.

His tweet added: “For the haters and the radical left Democrats – Game Over.”

The president’s legal team also hailed a “total victory” and claimed there had been “unprecedented cooperation” by Mr Trump with the special counsel’s work.

However, Mr Trump did not repeat his claim – made last month when Mr Mueller disclosed in a summary of his report that the president nor his team conspired with Russia to win the 2016 election – that he had been granted a “complete and total exoneration”.

Mr Trump’s political rivals urged the US public to ignore the “spin” over Mr Mueller’s report.

Invitations also flew in for Mr Mueller to testify before various US Congress committees on the results of his investigation.

The bullishness of Mr Trump in asserting “no obstruction” came despite US attorney general William Barr revealing Mr Mueller’s report recounted “10 episodes” involving the president and discussed “potential legal theories for connecting these actions to elements of an obstruction offence”.

However, Mr Barr himself used a news conference before the report’s publication to reveal his own conclusion that “the evidence developed by the special counsel is not sufficient to establish that the president committed an obstruction-of-justice offence”.

Robert Mueller
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Robert Mueller spent 22 months on his inquiry

The attorney general, the replacement for Mr Sessions who was sacked by Mr Trump last year, also claimed the “unprecedented situation” faced by the president should be taken into account when assessing his actions.

Mr Barr said: “As he entered into office, and sought to perform his responsibilities as president, federal agents and prosecutors were scrutinising his conduct before and after taking office, and the conduct of some of his associates.

“At the same time, there was relentless speculation in the news media about the president’s personal culpability.”

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, a senior Democrat, branded Mr Barr’s news conference “a complete farce and an embarrassing display of propaganda on behalf of President Trump”.

Democrat Senate leader Chuck Schumer and House of Representatives speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a joint statement: “The differences are stark between what Attorney General Barr said on obstruction and what Special Counsel Mueller said on obstruction.

“As we continue to review the report, one thing is clear: Attorney General Barr presented a conclusion that the president did not obstruct justice while Mueller’s report appears to undercut that finding.”

They both also called for Mr Mueller to provide public testimony to both houses of US Congress “as soon as possible”.

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Russia used social media to target 2014 European Parliament election, evidence suggests | World News

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Evidence of Kremlin efforts to use social media to target the 2014 European Parliament elections have been uncovered by researchers at Cardiff University.

They tracked the activities of Twitter accounts identified by the United States as being linked to the Kremlin’s Internet Research Agency (IRA).

This is the Russian organisation accused of running fake Twitter and Facebook accounts that targeted the 2016 US presidential election in support of Donald Trump.

Cardiff University found that one of the IRA accounts “appears to have been engaging in reconnaissance activities of European Parliamentary election processes in Greece in 2014”.

It discovered messages sent by whoever was operating the account that included photographs from inside polling stations of ballot boxes and pictures of ballot papers.

The team also noted that by 2016 these accounts were posting messages in a number of European languages, including French, German, Italian and Estonian.

“Collectively, these IRA Twitter accounts were displaying high levels of interest in the American elections, but there were also significant levels of interest in a series of elections and democratic events across Europe in 2016,” Cardiff University said in a report.

It added: “Based upon the maxim that the best guide to future behaviour is past conduct, the evidence presented suggests a strong potential for similar kinds of activities to be directed towards the 2019 European Parliamentary elections.”

Professor Martin Innes, director of the Crime and Security Research Institute at the university, said the research presented in two reports “clearly evidence a sustained and wide-ranging interest in European politics from social media accounts covertly run on behalf of the Kremlin”.

“By examining in forensic detail some of the tactics and techniques featuring in their historic information-influence operations, this research affords urgent insights about the future threats to the integrity of the democratic process as we approach the 2019 European elections.”

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Pentagon: US could send 10,000 more troops to Middle East to counter ‘Iran threat’ | US News

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The Pentagon is preparing to send as many as 10,000 more troops to the Middle East as tensions with Iran continue to rise, according to reports.

The move is not in response to any new threat but is aimed at strengthening security in the region, according to officials quoted by The Associated Press.

A final decision has not been made on the deployment, which could include additional weapons and ships.

Any increase in US troop numbers would contrast sharply with US President Donald Trump’s previous stated aim of reducing America’s military presence overseas.

Air Force Colonel Patrick Ryder, spokesman for the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said: “As a matter of long-standing policy, we are not going to discuss or speculate on potential or alleged future operations or plans.”

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo arrives for a closed-door briefing on Iran in the auditorium of the Capitol Visitors Center in Washington, DC, on May 21, 2019
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US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says the situation is being evaluated daily

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the situation was being evaluated “every day”, telling Fox And Friends: “We’re evaluating the risks, making sure that we have it right.”

Meanwhile, the German foreign ministry’s political director Jens Ploetner headed for Tehran on Thursday for talks with Deputy Foreign Minister Abbas Araghchi in an effort to stop the nuclear deal from falling apart.

The deal, signed under the Obama administration in 2015, had offered economic incentives in exchange for Iran curtailing its nuclear production.

But Mr Trump pulled the US out of the deal last year and has reimposed sanctions, hurting Iran’s struggling economy.

An F/A18E Super Hornet lands on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group is deployed to U.S. Central Command area of responsibility in order to defend American forces and interests in the region. With Abraham Lincoln as the flagship, deployed strike group assets include staffs, ships and aircraft(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Dan Snow/Released)
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Earlier this month, the US accelerated the deployment of an aircraft carrier to the Middle East

Iran – which has obeyed the deal’s conditions according to a February report by the International Atomic Energy Agency – gave the remaining signatories Germany, France, Britain, China and Russia two months to develop a plan to shield it from the effect of sanctions.

The German foreign ministry said in an email: “The situation in the Persian Gulf and the region, and the situation surrounding the Vienna nuclear agreement, is extremely serious.

“There is a real risk of escalation – including due to misunderstandings or an incident. In this situation, dialogue is very important.”

German deputy Foreign Ministry spokesman Jens Ploetner addresses a news conference in Berlin October 20, 2006
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Jens Ploetner is trying to save the Iran nuclear deal

On Monday, Iran said it had increased its production capacity of low-enriched uranium but that it would not be enriched beyond the 3.67% limit in the nuclear deal. This would mean it can be used for power but not for an atomic weapon.

Earlier this month, the US accelerated the deployment of an aircraft carrier to the Middle East and sent four B52 bombers to the region.

Non-essential US personnel have been told to leave Iran’s neighbour Iraq, due to what the Trump administration described as threats from Iranian-backed militias.

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Geoffrey Rush: Oscar-winning actor awarded record £1.5m damages in defamation case | World News

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Geoffrey Rush is set to receive the largest ever damages payout to a single person in Australia’s history following a defamation case against a newspaper publisher and journalist. 

The judge awarded Rush 2.9m Australian dollars (£1.5m) on Thursday, up from the original amount of 484,000 Australian dollars (£263,000), after taking the actor’s loss of earnings into consideration.

In the case, Oscar-winning Rush successfully sued Australia’s Nationwide News and journalist Jonathon Moran over its reporting in 2017 of accusations that he sexually abused actress Eryn Jean Norvill.

The pair appeared together in a production of Shakespeare’s King Lear in 2015 and 2016, where Norvill alleged the four-time Academy Award nominee had touched her inappropriately on several occasions, and had made lewd comments.

Rush has denied the accusations against him.

Norvill alleges that the Oscar-winning actor touched her inappropriately during a production of King Lear
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Norvill alleges the Oscar-winning actor touched her inappropriately during a King Lear production

Judge Michael Wigney found two reports and a poster by the company, which publishes the Daily Telegraph, to be defamatory toward the Shine actor.

He called the reporting, in an article headlined “King Leer”, a “recklessly irresponsible piece of sensationalist journalism of… the very worst kind”, according to The Sydney Morning Herald.

Both Nationwide News and Mr Moran intend to appeal the court’s decision.

In early 2018, Rush’s legal team said it would be happy to settle the case with an apology and a £27,000 payout from Nationwide News, but the outlet did not respond.

Stone's evidence was not heard in the case as the judge said her allegations could cause Rush prejudice
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Evidence from Yael Stone was not heard in the case

The media publisher later lost a key element in the almost two-week trial after Judge Wigney refused to allow Netflix actress Yael Stone to give evidence of her own personal experiences with Rush.

Stone alleges that the Australian actor behaved inappropriately toward her when they appeared together in a stage production of The Diary of a Madman in 2010. Rush denies the allegation.

However, Judge Wigney said Stone’s evidence created new allegations that would cause Rush “manifest and palpable” prejudice.

Rush said at the time that Stone’s allegations were “incorrect” and had in some cases “been taken completely out of context”.

He added: “I sincerely and deeply regret if I have caused her any distress.

“This, most certainly, has never been my intention.”

A record-breaking damages payout for Australia was awarded to actress Rebel Wilson in a defamation case against Bauer Media last year.

She was originally awarded £2.55m, but this was cut back to £327,000 following an appeal.

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