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Trump’s signature campaign promise keeps hitting a wall

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By Chuck Todd, Mark Murray and Carrie Dann

WASHINGTON — Over the last three months, President Trump’s push for a border wall has been a self-inflicted debacle for him and his party.

Think about it: a 35-day government shutdown, an emergency declaration that’s opposed by 60 percent of the country, 12 Republican senators joining Democrats to support a resolution terminating that emergency declaration, and now Trump threatening the first veto of his presidency.

What’s more, the debate over the emergency declaration forced a vulnerable GOP senator up for re-election in 2020 like Thom Tillis, R-N.C., to oppose the emergency declaration – and then vote for it.

NBC’s Peter Alexander reports that President Trump has now received the bill reversing the emergency declaration, and he has 10 days to veto it, which he’s promised to do.

Given that Congress is unlikely to override Trump’s veto, the fate of the emergency declaration to build a border wall is now in the courts’ hands.

Remember when Trump walked away from the deal for Congress to give him $20 billion-plus for the wall — in exchange for protection for DACA recipients?

Tragedy in New Zealand

The biggest news in the world today are the mass shootings in New Zealand, where at least 49 worshippers at two mosques were killed, with dozens of others injured.

“This is one of New Zealand’s darkest days,” Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said, per NBC News. “Clearly, what has happened here is an extraordinary and unprecedented act of violence.”

“These are people who I would describe as having extremist views, that have absolutely no place in New Zealand and in fact have no place in the world,” she added.

More: Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said that he was advised that one of those in custody is an Australian national, and he condemned the attack “by an extremist right-wing violent terrorist.”

Trump tweeted this morning, “My warmest sympathy and best wishes goes out to the people of New Zealand after the horrible massacre in the Mosques. 49 innocent people have so senselessly died, with so many more seriously injured. The U.S. stands by New Zealand for anything we can do. God bless all!”

Where Beto stands (and doesn’t stand) on the issues

On his first day as a presidential candidate, Beto O’Rourke took clear stances on some issues and was vague on others, NBC’s Alex Seitz-Wald writes.

On health care: Said his goal was “guaranteeing high-quality health care for every American.” Specifically mentioned the DeLauro-Schakowsky bill that would make Medicare accessible to all, but would also allow Americans to keep their private insurance.

On the Green New Deal: Said he supported the spirit of getting the United States to achieve net-zero emissions, and that he hasn’t seen “anything better” than the Green New Deal in trying to do this.

Reparations for slavery: Said the United States needs to reckon with systematic racism and have a possible conversation about reparations. But he didn’t endorse the effort.

On restructuring the Supreme Court: Said he was open to the idea, per Seitz-Wald. “What if there were five justices selected by Democrats, five Justices selected by Republicans, and those 10 then picked five more justices independent of those who chose the first 10? I think that’s an idea that we should explore.”

2020 Vision: Harris calls for moratorium on death penalty

In an interview yesterday with NPR, Democratic presidential candidate Kamala Harris yesterday called for a federal moratorium on the death penalty.

NPR: No one would be executed if you were president of the United States, for any crime.

HARRIS: Correct, correct.

On the campaign trail

Today: Beto O’Rourke remains in Iowa, while John Delaney also is in the Hawkeye State… Cory Booker, Kirsten Gillibrand and Elizabeth Warren are all in New Hampshire… Bernie Sanders continues campaigning in South Carolina… And on the GOP side, Bill Weld stumps in the Granite State.

Saturday: Booker, Delaney, Klobuchar and O’Rourke are all in Iowa.. Jay Inslee and Seth Moulton hit New Hampshire… And Sanders campaigns in Nevada.

Sunday: Booker, Delaney and Klobuchar stump in the Hawkeye State… And Elizabeth Warren goes to Memphis, Tenn.

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Politics

Brexit extension EXPLAINED: Which is most likely – two, three months, one or two years?

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MPS have voted to back an extension on Article 50 – effectively asking for a delay to Brexit. But how long could the delay be?

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No deal Brexit plans get MAJOR BOOST – UK agrees £30bn agreement with Iceland and Norway

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THE UK’s Trade Secretary boosted no deal Brexit plans by announcing a new trade agreement with the two Scandinavian countries as the Government looks to secure 39 EU trade deals before Brexit day.

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Booker denounces Trump’s rhetoric as ‘causing pain and fear’

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By Ludwig Hurtado

Democratic presidential candidate Cory Booker said in an interview set to air Monday night that President Donald Trump’s rhetoric “hurts people” and is “causing pain and fear.”

“Racists think he’s racist, and his language hurts people,” the New Jersey senator said when asked by MSNBC’s “Hardball” host Chris Matthews if he believes Trump is racist. “His language is causing pain and fear. The way he’s talking is making people afraid.”

In making the criticism, Booker, who spoke with Matthews while in Davenport, Iowa, referenced an increase in hate crimes around the country, saying, “people are afraid to go worship at a mosque or a synagogue because hate is on the rise, and these hate incidents are rising.”

“We have a president that can’t stand up with any moral authority and remind us that injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere and it’s despicable,” he added.

Booker’s comments come in the wake of the New Zealand mosque massacre on Friday, in which a white supremacist allegedly killed 50 people. The alleged shooter wrote in an apparent manifesto that he supported Trump “as a symbol of renewed white identity and common purpose,” although he said he disagreed with his policies.

Trump, who has made inflammatory comments about immigrants, Muslims and white nationalists, condemned the shooting on Friday. But when asked if he believes white nationalist terrorism and violence is a rising concern globally, the president said, said, “I don’t really.” He added that he thinks “it’s a small group of people that have very, very serious problems.”

On Monday morning, Trump tweeted, “The Fake News Media is working overtime to blame me for the horrible attack in New Zealand. They will have to work very hard to prove that one. So Ridiculous!”

There have been several white nationalist or white supremacist attacks in the U.S. over the past few years, including the massacre of 11 worshippers at a Pittsburgh synagogue last fall and the murder of nine black churchgoers at a congregation in Charleston, South Carolina, in 2015.

At a campaign event in Detroit on Monday, Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke also condemned Trump’s rhetoric.

“A president who calls Mexican immigrants rapists and criminals, a president who wants to ban all Muslim travel to the United States of America because, the implication being, Muslims are somehow more dangerous or violent than people of other traditions of faith, a president who calls Klansmen, and Nazis and white nationalists ‘very fine people’ is giving permission to others in this country and around the world to commit acts of hatred,” the former Texas congressman said.

Beto O’Rourke speaks with Chuck Todd in Iowa for “Meet The Press.”NBC News

O’Rourke noted that a mosque in his home state was burned to the ground on the day that Trump signed his Muslim travel ban.

“It’s not just the words,” O’Rourke said. “It’s the actions that follow.”

Acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney defended Trump during a pair of interviews on the Sunday political talk shows.

“You’ve seen the president stand up for religious liberty, individual liberty,” Mulvaney said on “Fox News Sunday.” “The president is not a white supremacist. I’m not sure how many times we have to say that. And to simply ask the question, every time something like this happens overseas, or even domestically, to say, ‘Oh, my goodness, it must somehow be the president’s fault,’ speaks to a politicization of everything that I think is undermining sort of the institutions that we have in the country today.”



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