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Trump vetoes bill that would block border wall national emergency

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President Donald Trump speaks about border security in the Oval Office of the White House, Friday, March 15, 2019, in Washington. Trump issued the first veto of his presidency, overruling Congress to protect his emergency declaration for border wall funding.

Evan Vucci | AP

President Donald Trump speaks about border security in the Oval Office of the White House, Friday, March 15, 2019, in Washington. Trump issued the first veto of his presidency, overruling Congress to protect his emergency declaration for border wall funding.

President Donald Trump rejected a bill Friday that would end the national emergency he declared at the southern U.S. border.

The president’s veto, signed in front of reporters in the Oval Office, is his first since he entered the White House. While the Democratic-held House will likely try to override his opposition, neither chamber of Congress appears to have enough support to reach the two-thirds majority needed.

The GOP-controlled Senate dealt a blow to Trump on Thursday, when 12 Republicans joined with Democrats in voting to terminate his emergency declaration. He publicly pushed Senate Republicans to vote against the House-passed resolution even as he shot down one plan that could have limited the number of GOP senators voting to block his flex of executive power.

In a tweet before he vetoed the bill, Trump thanked the GOP senators who he said “bravely voted for Strong Border Security and the WALL.”

“Watch, when you get back to your State, they will LOVE you more than ever before!” he wrote.

Though Trump has pushed back congressional efforts to check his declaration for now, his administration still has to fight court challenges. More than a dozen states and several outside groups have filed lawsuits challenging his executive action.

Democrats plan to vote to override Trump’s veto on March 26, NBC News reported, citing two sources. Rep. Joaquin Castro, a Texas Democrat who introduced the measure to block the declaration in the House, said Thursday that he will try to gather support for another vote even though it will be “very tough” to reach a two-thirds majority.

Trump declared a national emergency at the U.S.-Mexico border last month to divert already approved Defense Department money to build his proposed border wall. He demanded $5.7 billion for border barriers as part of a spending plan to fund the government through September, but Congress denied him. Lawmakers passed only $1.4 billion for structures on the border.

Democrats said Trump created a sham emergency in order to circumvent Congress’ appropriations power. Republicans also worried the president setting a dangerous precedent that Democrats could use to declare emergencies related to other topics such as climate change and gun violence.

Trump hopes to put $8 billion total toward the border wall, including the money allocated by Congress. Using emergency powers, he would divert $3.6 billion from military construction funds. With other executive actions, he hopes to pull the remainder from other Pentagon and Treasury Department funds.

The wall will not go away as a political issue. Trump set up another fight with Democrats when he asked for an additional $8.6 billion for border barriers in his recently released fiscal 2020 budget.

Democrats could also vote on whether to block the national emergency declaration every six months.

This story is developing. Please check back for updates.

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Cboe to stop listing bitcoin futures as interest in crypto trading cools

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A trader works in S&P 500 stock index options pit at the Chicago Board Options Exchange (CBOE) in Chicago, Illinois.

Jim Young | Bloomberg | Getty Images

A trader works in S&P 500 stock index options pit at the Chicago Board Options Exchange (CBOE) in Chicago, Illinois.

The major U.S. exchange company that paved the way for bitcoin futures has had a change of heart.

Cboe Global Markets, which rolled out the first bitcoin futures contracts in December 2017, has decided to stop adding new ones. In a statement last week, the Cboe Futures Exchange said it will not add new bitcoin futures in March. It did not rule out the possibility of other cryptocurrency derivatives, though, and “is assessing” its approach for how it plans to continue.

In the meantime, active bitcoin contracts are still available to trade, but the last of them expires in June.

Futures are a way for investors to bet on whether the price of a commodity — in this case bitcoin — will rise or fall. The contracts expire each month, meaning an exchange has to continuously list more if it wants to keep the market alive.

The move by Cboe highlights cooling enthusiasm for bitcoin after an all-out mania led by retail investors in 2017. When the “XBT” futures launched in December of that year, bitcoin was trading near $17,000. Not long after, it shot to almost $20,000. Prices have come crashing down by 80 percent since. Bitcoin was trading near $4,000 as of Monday afternoon.

Cboe was not the only exchange to try to capitalize on the bitcoin frenzy. Its Chicago-based rival CME Group debuted its own cash-settled bitcoin contracts, also denominated in U.S. dollars, and has not announced any changes. CME’s version has historically seen more trading volume. CME bitcoin futures’ 30-day average volume is more than four times larger than Cboe’s.

When they were introduced, futures gave investors a way to buy and sell cryptocurrency in a regulated marketplace. Those in favor of it said it would be a way to usher institutional investors into the bitcoin marketplace. There has been little evidence of that happening in the form of crypto derivatives.

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Jamie Dimon says we’ve split the U.S. economy, leaving the poor behind

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Jamie Dimon, chief executive officer of JPMorgan Chase & Co., gestures while speaking during a Bloomberg Television interview at the JPMorgan Global Markets Conference in Paris, France, on Thursday, March 14, 2019.

Christopher Morin | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Jamie Dimon, chief executive officer of JPMorgan Chase & Co., gestures while speaking during a Bloomberg Television interview at the JPMorgan Global Markets Conference in Paris, France, on Thursday, March 14, 2019.

J.P. Morgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon said that the U.S. economy has essentially been split into those benefiting from thriving corporations and those who are left behind.

“I don’t want to be a tone deaf CEO; while the company is doing fine, it is absolutely obvious that a big chunk of [people] have been left behind,” Dimon said. “Forty percent of Americans make less than $15 an hour. Forty percent of Americans can’t afford a $400 bill, whether it’s medical or fixing their car. Fifteen percent of Americans make minimum wages, 70,000 die from opioids” annually.

“If you travel around to most neighborhoods where companies live, they’re doing fine,” Dimon said. “So we’ve kind of bifurcated the economy.”

Dimon was speaking at an event at the bank’s New York headquarters to unveil a new $350 million program to boost job prospects for people in under-served communities. The J.P. Morgan chairman and CEO has frequently voiced concern about the declining labor force participation rate and the shortfalls of the educational system in preparing people for emerging roles.

Making progress against these issues involves companies working with local organizations to provide skills outside of the university context, he said.

Dimon called the education system “broken” and said his bank stopped giving philanthropic dollars to colleges years ago.

“Harvard and Princeton are not a philanthropy,” Dimon said. “Helping these kids is.”

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Apple Watch heart study with Stanford: results and debate

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Apple and researchers from Stanford Medicine released some new results from a study of more than 400,000 participants, who were given Apple Watches eight months ago to monitor their heart rhythm to signs of a medical condition known as atrial fibrillation. The watches are not the newest version, which has an electrocardiogram built-in, but are able to detect abnormal heartbeats.

The results were presented on stage this weekend at the American College of Cardiology conference in New Orleans, prompting a wide range of reactions from the cardiologists who attended. The discussion was not just limited to the Apple Watch, but about the role of consumer wearables more broadly in screening and potentially even diagnosing disease.

In interviews with CNBC, some in the medical community pointed to the high participation in the study as reason enough for optimism — 419,000 is far higher than most medical research studies — while others expressed concern that Apple Watch would produce many false alarms.

Most agreed that the results presented on stage were still preliminary, as the full paper has not been published in a scientific journal. Moreover, it was an observational study, and not a randomized controlled trial. (Apple is moving ahead with study of this kind that includes a control arm for the heart health features on its Apple Watch, in partnership with pharmaceutical company Johnson & Johnson.)

Atrial fibrillation is an important health target for Apple, as it impacts up to six million people in the United States, but many of them have not been diagnosed. For some people, especially those over the age of 65, the condition can put them at a higher risk for serious health complications, including strokes.

Heart health is the focus of Apple’s efforts in health care, so it’s vital for the company to win over the support of cardiologists. At this stage, Apple is ahead of its rivals, including Alphabet and Samsung, in introducing novel health features to its devices. But to win over the medical community, it needs to open up a dialog about the pros and cons, and publish research in scientific journals, which is not in the DNA of a company that has historically prized secrecy.

For Apple, its inaugural heart study with Stanford represents an important first step, and just one of its ongoing medical research efforts.

“We’re trying to be thoughtful about how we introduce this in partnership with the medical community,” said Sumbul Desai, a physician and Apple’s vice president of health, in an interview with CNBC. “We want to hear (from doctors) about all the positives and all the negatives.”

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