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Meng Wanzhou Huawei extradition case could have an advantage

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Huawei Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou’s civil lawsuit against Canada could give her defense team a potential advantage to fight her extradition to the United States, a lawyer told CNBC on Thursday.

Last week, Meng’s lawyers said they were suing the Canadian government, its border agency and the country’s federal police for their role in arresting her at the request of the U.S., Reuters said. The CFO was arrested in Vancouver on Dec. 1.

Meng’s “defense got creative last week,” Richard Kurland, a policy analyst and lawyer from Kurland Tobe immigration law firm, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box.”

“There’s a multiplicity of litigation in this Huawei affair,” he said, explaining that the civil proceedings could be used to pry documents and information from senior government officials from both the U.S. and Canada that may ultimately aid Meng’s side in the extradition case.

Meng’s lawyers argue she was detained, searched and interrogated for three hours in Vancouver before her arrest in violation of her constitutional rights, including the right to remain silent or the right to counsel.

Kurland pointed out the defense could argue evidence gathered prior to the arrest is inadmissible in court. They can further state “the conduct at the airport, on arrival, by Canadian government officials brings the administration of justice into disrepute. And the entire extradition case falls on that,” he said.

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Beto O’Rourke, like Obama, seeks middle in 2020 Democratic field

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“Climate change is the most immediate example of that. If you’re going to bring the total innovation and ingenuity of this country to bear, our system as a country, our economy, is going to have to be part of that,” he said.

O’Rourke’s comments represented a break with the Democratic Party’s left wing, which supports the idea of radically restructuring how markets work, especially energy markets.

More importantly, in terms of the primary, it signaled that O’Rourke intends to fashion himself as a sort of anti-Sanders – a champion for capitalism, albeit a much more tightly regulated version than the one espoused by the Trump administration.

It’s also important to hear what O’Rourke isn’t saying.

He doesn’t rail against the evils of Wall Street, a subject area in which Warren tops her rivals, both in expertise and in passion.

And he doesn’t vilify “billionaires” the way Sanders does when, for instance, the Vermont senator tells crowds that the “system is rigged” and “this country just does not belong to a handful of billionaires.”

It remains to be seen, though, how much further O’Rourke intends to go in order to differentiate himself from rival Democrats. But already, he appears to be staking out economic ground so far unclaimed, and rejecting some of the party’s more polarizing rhetoric.

Asked at a December town hall in Texas if he considered himself to be a “progressive,” O’Rourke replied: “I don’t know.”

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Apple announces WWDC 2019 dates: June 3-7

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Apple on Thursday announced that it will host its annual Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) from June 3 through June 7 in San Jose, California.

Apple typically uses the first day of the show to host a keynote for developers and press where it unveils its latest software and sometimes new hardware. That means it’s expected to reveal iOS 13 for iPhone and iPad, as well as the latest versions of the software for Apple Watch, Apple TV and macOS for Macs.

Last year, Apple stuck to software and didn’t announce and new hardware. But, in 2017, it used the opening keynote to reveal updates to the iMac, MacBook, MacBook Pro and also introduced the HomePod and a 10.5-inch iPad Pro.

If Apple doesn’t announce any hardware at its March 25 event, it’s possible we’ll see new hardware including AirPower, AirPods 2, the rumored 10.2-inch iPad and the high-end Mac Pro on June 3.

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UK competition watchdog must examine digital ad market, Hammond says

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Google and Facebook accounted for an estimated 54 percent of digital advertising revenues in the U.K. in 2017, according to the report.

“In addition to the prominent position occupied by the digital platforms, there are a number of market features that may present barriers to entry and expansion,” the report said.

The CMA said on Wednesday it is considering whether to undertake work in the digital advertising sector but added its ability to launch new projects is “heavily dependent on the outcome of EU Exit negotiations.”

Like many other organizations in the British government, the CMA is facing uncertainty over its role once the U.K. leaves the European Union. Lawmakers rejected Theresa May’s Brexit deal in a resounding defeat Tuesday and are set to vote on an extension to the Brexit deadline, currently March 29, Thursday night. In his letter, Hammond acknowledged the CMA would have “increased responsibility for ongoing competition cases with a European dimension” after Brexit.

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