Connect with us

Politics

Midterm turnout surges to 50-year high, early estimates show

Published

on

Breaking News Emails

Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings.

By Benjy Sarlin

WASHINGTON — Voter turnout soared in the 2018 midterm elections, according to an early projection in a new study, potentially reaching the highest level in over 50 years.

An estimated 48.1 percent of eligible voters cast ballots, over 113 million people in total, according to research by University of Florida Professor Michael McDonald, who runs the U.S. Election Project. If that holds it would be the highest rate since 1966, when 48.7 percent of voters participated.

The numbers are still subject to change as states continue to report final vote counts, especially places like California, where voters can mail in their choices all the way up to Election Day and large numbers of ballots have yet to be counted.

The high turnout, which was presaged by a surge in early votes, as well as primary and special election votes, comes after voters participated at historically low rates just four years ago in the 2014 midterms. Just 36.7 percent of voters cast ballots that year, the lowest percentage since World War II.

McDonald attributed the increase to a variety of factors, including more high-profile and competitive Senate and governor races in key states. The House, which flipped to Democrats, was also much more hotly contested this year in comparison to 2014, when Republicans were considered prohibitive favorites to maintain control.

Texas, which had the lowest turnout in 2014 amid mostly non-competitive state races, saw its turnout rate spike as voters went to polls in the closely watched Senate race between Republican Sen. Ted Cruz and Democratic challenger Beto O’Rourke. But the effect also extended to states like North Carolina, which saw high turnout despite an off-year for both senate and gubernatorial elections.

But the biggest factor seems to be President Donald Trump. Unlike previous midterms, where one party’s voters showed up in high numbers and the other remained depressed, the high turnout rates suggest voters across the board were eager to participate. Exit polls found two-thirds of voters identified Trump as important to their vote, either to show their support or register their opposition.

“Let’s give Trump some credit: He inflames passions for both Democrats and Republicans,” McDonald said.

Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Politics

Brexit deal: What does FRANCE want the UK's Brexit deal?

Published

on

THERESA May’s Cabinet saw a host of resignations following her controversial Brexit deal, leading many to question what will be gained in the name of the new plan. So, what does France want from Theresa May’s Brexit deal?

Source link

Continue Reading

Politics

Brexit deal: Why did Dominic Raab and Jeremy Hunt U-TURN their stance on Brexit?

Published

on

BREXIT has now taken shape, with Theresa May providing a controversial deal ahead of crucial EU summit negotiations next week – but why have Jeremy Hunt and Dominic Raab taken a U-turn on their Brexit stance?

Source link

Continue Reading

Politics

Trump says Ivanka’s personal email use in government not like Clinton’s

Published

on

Breaking News Emails

Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings.

By Daniel Barnes

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump on Tuesday defended daughter Ivanka Trump’s use of a personal email account to communicate with government officials, saying there was nothing wrong with her actions.

“Early on and for a little period of time, Ivanka did some emails,” the president told reporters as he was departing the White House for Mar-a-Lago. “They weren’t classified like Hillary Clinton. They weren’t deleted like Hillary Clinton.”

Ivanka Trump, who also serves as an unpaid senior White House adviser, used a personal email account to send hundreds of emails to officials both before and after formally joining the administration, according to a report from the Washington Post.

Trump made Hillary Clinton’s use of a personal email account during her time as secretary of state a key part of his 2016 presidential campaign message. The president told reporters Tuesday that the two situations aren’t comparable.

“I looked at it, just very briefly today, and the presidential records — they’re all in presidential records,” the president said. “There was no hiding, there was no deleting like Hillary Clinton did. There was no server in the basement like Hillary Clinton did.”

Ivanka Trump, who was traveling with the president, ignored shouted questions from reporters.

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending