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‘It's about CONTROL’ MEP SLAMS EU for JEOPARDISING post-Brexit free-trade deals

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Don't forget us! Ireland begs EU for compromise as Dublin FINALLY realises economic threat

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IRELAND has urged the European Union and United Kingdom to allow Northern Irish exporters to be included in the bloc’s existing and future free-trade agreements, it has emerged.

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Why the election matters everywhere

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North and South Korea

By Grace Moon

SEOUL, South Korea — North and South Korea are wildly different nations, but both are watching the U.S. election closely. 

The North’s leadership most likely prefers President Donald Trump to Joe Biden in the upcoming election, according to experts, despite stalled nuclear talks that Washington hoped would lead the country’s leader, Kim Jong Un, to give up his nuclear arsenal

Biden has labelled the secretive and reclusive Kim a “tyrant” and is expected to take a more traditional and cautious line than Trump when it comes to nuclear negotiations. 

“Biden’s emphasis on human rights in North Korea is the equivalent of shooting an arrow straight toward Kim,” said Yang Moo-jin, a professor at the University of North Korean Studies in Seoul. “Most North Koreans don’t have great expectations for Biden. But they’ll be monitoring his next moves.”

North Korea, a dictatorship that has pursued a nuclear weapons arsenal, has been severely affected by U.S. sanctions and in the past requested help from international organizations to alleviate food shortages. 

North Korea stands at the heart of the U.S. relationship with South Korea, a modern, thriving democracy.

Nearly 70 years after the Korean War ended in an armistice, the U.S. military continues to have a large presence in South Korea. Trump has demanded that Seoul pay more for the 28,500 U.S. troops stationed there.

When it comes to the job performance of the current U.S. leadership, South Koreans seem to be almost evenly split, with 41 percent approving and 47 percent disapproving, according to a July Gallup poll

However, when Trump became the first U.S. president to set foot in North Korea in 2019, there was an overwhelmingly positive reaction in the South.

Trump became the first sitting American president to step on North Korean soil on June 30, 2019, as he met Kim in the heavily fortified Demilitarized Zone. (Susan Walsh / AP file)

Trump became the first sitting American president to step on North Korean soil on June 30, 2019, as he met Kim in the heavily fortified Demilitarized Zone. (Susan Walsh / AP file)

A Pew survey in January showed that 78 percent of respondents approved of U.S. talks with the North. However, a Pew poll released in September showed that only 17 percent believe Trump would do the right thing regarding world affairs.

According to Chul Lee, who left his hometown, Pyongyang — the North’s capital — in 2014 for South Korea, North Korean defectors appreciated Trump’s willingness to work with Kim, but feel frustrated by the abrupt and inconclusive ending to the Hanoi summit in 2019

“Whereas the Bush administration cited North Korea in the ‘axis of evil,’ Trump was quite unconventional,” said Lee, a senior research fellow at the government-funded Institute for National Security Strategy. “But sheer unpreparedness led to the shattering of the Hanoi summit and since then, many North Koreans have become skeptical.”

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Brexit talks extended: When is Brexit transition deadline?

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BREXIT talks are currently ongoing in London until Wednesday having restarted on Thursday after reports from both sides they had stalled. But when is the Brexit transition deadline?

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