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Ariana Rockefeller says family taught the value of hard work and giving back

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Despite being a Rockefeller, as a child Ariana Rockefeller had to record her allowance — how much she got, how much she spent and where, she said.

“The message was, a dollar is a dollar and to value that and to put a lot of value on hard work and the enjoyment of life, of course, and to give back,” Rockefeller told CNBC’s Robert Frank on “Power Lunch” Thursday.

In fact, her grandfather, David Rockefeller, the legendary American banker who died in 2017, gave back about $2 billion over his lifetime to various philanthropic endeavors.

This week David and Peggy Rockefeller’s personal collection is on sale during a weeklong auction at Christie’s in New York.

“There’s a time for private life, and there’s a time to step forward,” Ariana Rockefeller said. “This was really my grandparents’ vision.”

The auction house estimated the collection to be worth about $500 million. As of Thursday, the collection had made more than $765 million, including the sale of a Picasso painting for $115 million. Proceeds from the auction will go to charity.

The collection includes the family’s personal artifacts, such as a treasured picnic basket, candlesticks, paintings and fine china, among other things. Rockefeller said she is excited that the public loves the collection as much as her grandfather did.

“He really used almost every piece in his collection and loved it,” she said. “I think my grandfather had such great taste, and he really cherished beautiful things.”

All family members got to keep one item from the collection, worth up to $1 million, she said. Rockefeller, who launched her own fashion label in 2011, chose a bracelet her grandfather once bought for her grandmother.

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Ant Group to raise $34.5 billion in the biggest IPO of all time

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The Ant Group logo and the Alibaba Group logo are displayed at the company’s headquarters in Hangzhou, China.

Qilai Shen | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Ant Group will raise $34.5 billion in its dual initial public offering (IPO) after setting the price for its shares on Monday, making it the biggest listing of all time.

The Chinese financial technology giant previously said it would split its stock issuance equally across Shanghai and Hong Kong, issuing 1.67 billion new shares in each location.

Ant Group’s Shanghai-listed shares will be priced at 68.8 yuan each. The issuing of 1.67 billion shares will raise 114.94 billion yuan or $17.23 billion, according to the exchange rate listed in the official filings.

The Hong Kong-listed shares have been priced at 80 Hong Kong dollars each, raising 133.65 billion Hong Kong dollars or $17.24 billion.

The listing will raise a total of just under $34.5 billion, with the possibility for that figure to go higher if the so-called over-allotment option is exercised, depending on demand. It makes it the largest IPO of all time, putting it ahead of previous record holder Saudi Aramco, which raised just over $29 billion.

Ant’s valuation based on the pricing will be $313.37 billion, larger than some of the biggest banks in the U.S., including Goldman Sachs and Wells Fargo.

The Chinese company previously said that strategic investors have agreed to subscribe to 80% of the company’s Shanghai-issued shares. Alibaba, via its subsidiary Zhejiang Tmall Technology, has agreed to buy 730 million A-shares, which are yuan-denominated shares of Chinese companies listed in mainland exchanges. This will allow Alibaba to maintain its roughly 33% stake in Ant Group.

Ant’s pricing comes after regulators in mainland China and Hong Kong gave the green light for the listing last week.

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SAP market cap plunges by $30 billion as coronavirus takes its toll

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A company logo is attached to the headquarters of the SAP software group.

Uwe Anspach | picture alliance | Getty Images

LONDON — German enterprise software group SAP saw its market valuation fall by 25 billion euros ($30 billion) on Monday as shares collapsed by over 17% following disappointing third-quarter results.

The company, which slashed its revenue forecast for 2020, saw its market cap fall from 125 billion euros to 100 billion euros and it is on track for its worst trading day in 12 years.

SAP said coronavirus lockdowns would affect demand for its business relations and customer management software well into 2021 as it announced that it plans to go all-in on cloud computing.

The firm is abandoning medium-term profitability targets and it warned that it will take longer than expected to recover from the pandemic.

“As the CEO of SAP, I have to be focused on the long-term value creation of this company,” SAP Chief Executive Christian Klein told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe” on Monday.

“So I cannot trade the success of our customers and the significant revenue potential of SAP against short-term margin optimization.”

JPMorgan cut its price target for SAP to 120 from 160 euros, and downgraded the stock to “neutral” from “overweight.”

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Thai protests could turn violent and lead to a military coup: Analyst

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Thailand could potentially return to rule under the military junta again — if violence should flare up between pro-democracy student protesters and “counter-protesters” loyal to the establishment, one analyst told CNBC on Monday.   

The pro-democracy protests, which have lasted for months, have been largely peaceful so far. Among the protesters’ list of demands are the resignation of Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha and reforms to the monarchy. Prayuth has ignored protesters’ deadline for him to step down.

Royalists — commonly known as the “yellow shirts” — have in recent weeks started to hold counter protests. Last Wednesday, a small counter protest in Bangkok turned violent when a few attendees attacked student demonstrators on the anti-government camp, reported the Associated Press.

“I think that there’s going to be growing tensions which could actually develop into some conflict, perhaps some violent conflict and that’s very dangerous,” Paul Chambers, lecturer and advisor at Naresuan University’s Center of ASEAN Community Studies, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Asia.”

“These peaceful protests are going to continue, try to continue on. However, there’s going to be some right-wing counter-protesters who I expect are going to try to create some violence, which could lead to some injuries and deaths and eventually, even potentially a military coup,” he said.

Chambers explained that if clashes between pro-democracy protesters and royalists grow, the military would have the “perfect rationale” to intervene. That could put an end to the current “facade democracy” — which is indirectly dominated by the military — and mark the beginning of a new junta, he said.

Such a development will not bring much peace for the country, he added.

Thailand is no stranger to military coups, having last experienced one in 2014 engineered by the current prime minister. Last year, the country held its first general election since that coup, which saw the military-backed Palang Pracharath Party lead the coalition government.

Prayuth — now retired from the army — was selected as prime minister by a parliament consisting of many appointed senators from the Thai military and police.

The economic outlook for the Southeast Asian country has dimmed substantially this year even though the country’s coronavirus outbreak is now largely under control. The International Monetary Fund projected the Thai economy could contract by 7.1% this year.

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