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Giuliani leaves law firm to focus on representing Trump in Mueller probe

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“In light of the pressing demands of the Mueller investigation, I believe it is in everyone’s best interest that I make it a permanent resignation,” Giuliani said in a statement. “This way, my sole concentration can be on this critically important matter for our country.”

The decision was first reported by The New York Times.

Giuliani told NBC News in a phone interview later Thursday that when he took on the role as the president’s lawyer, he initially thought it would be “part-time and quick,” but realized that “you can’t just jump in and jump out.” He called his departure from the firm “a mutual decision.”

Richard A. Rosenbaum, Greenberg Traurig’s executive chairman, confirmed the departure to NBC News, saying, “After recognizing that this work is all consuming and is lasting longer than initially anticipated, Rudy has determined it is best for him to resign from the firm.” The resignation became effective on Wednesday, the statement said.

Giuliani has caused a stir in a series of recent interviews, particularly one with Fox News’ Sean Hannity earlier this month in which he revealed that the president had reimbursed his personal attorney, Michael Cohen, for a $130,000 payment to porn star Stormy Daniels despite the president previously denying knowledge of the transaction.

Daniels has claimed to have had a sexual affair with Trump, something the White House and Cohen have denied, and that she was paid to keep quiet just days before the 2016 election. In February, Cohen had said he used his own money to pay Daniels, and that Trump had not reimbursed him.

Giuliani’s revelation raised eyebrows because neither Cohen’s original outlay to Daniels, nor Trump’s repayment were reported to the Federal Elections Commission as contributions to a campaign that could have benefited from the performer’s silence.

The lawyer attempted to clarify his remarks last week, insisting that Trump had only recently found out that he had reimbursed Cohen and saying the payment did not amount to a campaign finance violation because it “was made to resolve a personal and false allegation in order to protect the president’s family.”

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Von der Leyen in 'stealth power grab' plot for total control of European spending

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EU chief Ursula von der Leyen has been accused of trying to “power grab” across states in the European Union.

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Amy Coney Barrett set to be confirmed to Supreme Court on Monday

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WASHINGTON — The Republican-controlled Senate is poised to confirm Amy Coney Barrett on Monday as a Supreme Court justice, handing President Donald Trump a political victory days before the election.

The final vote is scheduled at 7:30 p.m. ET on Monday — 30 days after Trump announced he was nominating Barrett for the seat left vacant by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died on Sept. 18. The vote could be held later if Democrats force delays.

The White House is considering holding a swearing-in ceremony for Barrett after the vote, either late Monday or on Tuesday, according to an administration official.

Only a simple majority, 51 votes, is need to confirm Barrett, and while all members in the Democratic caucus are expected to oppose, Republicans appear to have enough votes to reach that threshold.

With a week until the election, her confirmation is a victory for Trump and Senate Republicans, all who are campaigning on having delivered a conservative majority on the court.

“We made an important contribution to the future of this country. A lot of what we’ve done over the last four years will be undone sooner or later by the next election. They won’t be able to do much about this for a long time to come,” McConnell said on the Senate floor Sunday.

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, reversed course over the weekend and said that she would vote in favor of the nomination despite previously voicing opposition to confirming a justice before Election Day. Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, who is one of the most vulnerable Senate Republicans running for re-election, said that she would vote against Barrett.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said that the confirmation will be “an inerasable stain on this Republican majority forevermore.” He also voiced outrage at the prospect of Vice President Mike Pence presiding over the vote on Monday after five people in his office tested positive for Covid-19.

Democrats have warned that Barrett’s confirmation would lead to the end of the Affordable Care Act. The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments on Nov. 10 in a case challenging the health care law. They also fear that she would vote in favor of overturning 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade decision that made abortion illegal.

Hallie Jackson and Kristen Welker contributed.



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Don't forget us! Ireland begs EU for compromise as Dublin FINALLY realises economic threat

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IRELAND has urged the European Union and United Kingdom to allow Northern Irish exporters to be included in the bloc’s existing and future free-trade agreements, it has emerged.

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