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Trump’s Cold War rhetoric over Syria doesn’t reflect reality, experts say

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That period between 1947 and 1991 featured several incidents where the world appeared to be teetering on the brink of Armageddon. While deeply concerning, he said, the standoff over Syria isn’t anywhere near that level.

“There were so many different situations during the Cold War,” said Giles, who is a a senior consulting fellow at London’s Chatham House think tank. “There were periods of stability and periods of tension that were far worse than what we’re experiencing now.”

Trump’s tweet suggested he believes the current tension to be worse than what’s widely regarded to be the riskiest moment of the 20th century, the Cuban missile crisis of October 1962.

This was the only time during the Cold War when U.S. forces were placed on DEFCON 2, in what the State Department’s Office of the Historian calls “the moment when the two superpowers came closest to nuclear conflict.”

While this was the most notorious near miss, it was far from the only one. In 1983, for example, a military drill carried out by the U.S. and its allies was so realistic that it convinced Soviet generals that a nuclear strike was imminent.

“I think that this is an enormous and rather characteristic amount of hyperbole from Donald Trump,” said Justin Bronk, a research fellow at the Royal United Services Institute, referring to the latest outburst over Syria. “At times during the Cold War, we were literally minutes away at various points from all-out nuclear war.”

So while it may be a stretch to couch the current standoff as the worst ever, some analysts do feel that Washington-Moscow ties may be at their lowest ebb for more than three decades.

 President Ronald Reagan meets with Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev during a summit between the superpowers in Geneva on Nov. 21, 1985. AFP / Getty Images file

“Relations between leading Western countries and Russia are as bad as they have been since the early 1980s,” according to Duncan Allan, a former official with the British Foreign Office who worked in the U.K.’s embassies in Moscow and Kiev.

The early 80s saw the Soviets shoot down a Korean airliner and NATO deploy more nuclear weapons to Western Europe. The appointment of Mikhail Gorbachev as Soviet leader in 1985 saw relations thaw.

Dmitri Trenin, the head of the Carnegie Moscow Centre and a former Soviet military officer, agreed that today’s events are the worst since that time.

Nevertheless, all of the analysts who spoke with NBC News on Thursday said Trump’s Cold War comparison was a limited and overly simplistic way of talking about a complex, modern theater like Syria.

Russia is a very different beast to the old Soviet Union. Its economy is smaller than Italy’s and, like in the U.S., its arsenal of nuclear weapons is greatly reduced, although still enough to end the world many times over.

“We are not dealing with the USSR, we’re not dealing with a superpower,” said Allan, who is now an associate fellow at Chatham House. “The Russians won’t thank you for saying that, but they are not a superpower comparable to the United States.”

While some of the old threats may have diminished, new ones have arisen, for example cyberattacks and other forms of online meddling that Russia has been accused of deploying in recent years.



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