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Mark Zuckerberg testimony live blog: Facebook CEO to testify before Congress

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Welcome to the Mark Zuckerberg Congressional Testimony Liveblog Extravaganza from NBC News!

We’re here to keep track of what should be a long day of testimony Tuesday while also providing you with some context, fact checking, and just a bit of levity.

The basics: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is testifying before a joint session of two Senate committees: Judiciary and Commerce. That will mean a total of 44 senators, all of whom are allotted four minutes each for questions and answers. That means we could be here allllllll day.

They’ll likely ask about the company’s handling of user data, particularly as it pertains to the scandal surrounding how data analysis firm Cambridge Analytics was able to target ads based off the Facebook data of around 87 million users. It’s also likely that Zuckerberg will face questions over how the company missed that Russia-linked accounts were using Facebook to spread divisive political messages.

It’s a seminal moment for Zuckerberg — who is facing Congress for the first time — and the U.S. government, both of which have been slow to respond to the issues posed by Facebook.

On Monday, Zuckerberg released his prepared statement for his testimony, issuing an apology and taking responsibility for its indiscretions.

“We didn’t take a broad enough view of our responsibility, and that was a big mistake,” he wrote. “It was my mistake, and I’m sorry. I started Facebook, I run it, and I’m responsible for what happens here.”

Zuckerberg wrote that he now realizes that the company stated goal of connecting people had been short sighted.

“It’s not enough to just connect people, we have to make sure those connections are positive,” Zuckerberg wrote in his statement. “It’s not enough to just give people a voice, we have to make sure people aren’t using it to hurt people or spread misinformation.”

Read more. 

In an interview Monday with MSNBC’s Ali Velshi, Apple Co-Founder Steve Wozniak said Mark Zuckerberg won’t do anything to fix Facebook.

“He could but he won’t,” Wozniak said. “Personalities don’t change.”

“I’m going to trick you out a little and pretend to do little light things, but nothing that is going to cost me money over your privacy,” he added of Zuckerberg. 

Wozniak recently announced that he is deleting his Facebook account in light of the company’s data privacy issues. He explained to MSNBC’s Ali Velshi he’s for the “little guys, the users,” and challenged Facebook for making the user their product, a critique similar to one recently made by current Apple CEO, Tim Cook  on MSNBC.

Facebook’s recent crisis is just one of many privacy issues that company has had to deal with in its relatively short existence.

Taking a step back to look at Facebook’s pattern of privacy issues provides an important perspective on just how many times the company has faced serious criticism. 

Go here for a rundown of the biggest privacy issues Facebook has faced to date.

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Alastair Campbell sparks Rejoiner glee as he blames UK's fuel crisis on Brexit

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BREXIT Rejoiner glee has exploded into life once again after Alastair Campbell claimed the UK’s departure from the European Union is to blame for the fuel crisis sweeping throughout the country.

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Rep. Lauren Boebert improperly used campaign funds for rent, utilities

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Rep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., improperly spent thousands of dollars in campaign funds on rent and utilities, her campaign acknowledged this week in a filing with the Federal Election Commission, but said they have paid the money back.

The FEC had asked Boebert’s campaign treasurer in a letter last month for more information about $6000 in payments that had been listed in her quarterly filing as a “personal expense of Lauren Boebert billed to campaign account in error.” The filing said the money had already been paid back.

The letter warned “if it is determined that the disbursement(s) constitutes the personal use of campaign funds, the Commission may consider taking further legal action. However, prompt action to obtain reimbursement of the funds in question will be taken into consideration.”

In a filing this week, the campaign said the money had been sent to a person named John Pacheco at the same address as Boebert’s restaurant, Shooters Grill. The eatery in the town of Rifle is best known for its armed waitresses.

Boebert communications director Ben Stout said the “funds were reimbursed months ago when Rep. Boebert self-reported the error.”

The use of campaign funds for personal expenses is prohibited by the FEC. It defines personal use “as any use of funds in a campaign account of a candidate (or former candidate) to fulfill a commitment, obligation or expense of any person that would exist irrespective of the candidate’s campaign or responsibilities as a federal officeholder.”

The agency’s penalties can range from a letter reminding the candidate of their obligations to financial penalties.

Asked for comment on the new filing, FEC spokesman Myles Martin said, “We cannot comment on specific candidates or committees.”

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SNP shamed as Sturgeon's Health minister 'off the hook' over ministerial 'breach'

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FURY has erupted after it emerged an SNP minister in Nicola Sturgeon’s cabinet got “off the hook” after being reported over allegedly breaching the Scottish Parliament’s ministerial code over the ongoing ambulance crisis.

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