Connect with us

Politics

Did Trump’s tweets on the Syria attack lock him into an even bigger military retaliation?

Published

on

Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings.

News Analysis

President Donald Trump’s tweets today calling Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad an “animal” for the suspected use of poison gas on his own people were extraordinary on many levels.

First, they undermine Trump’s stated determination to get out of Syria, having argued with his military advisers only last week that he prefers to get U.S. troops out in months, not years.

Second, by calling the attack “mindless,” an “atrocity” and a “humanitarian disaster,” Trump would appear to have locked himself into retaliating with at least a symbolic, targeted air strike against the regime for what appears to be yet another use of internationally banned chemical weapons — as Trump did on April 6, 2017, almost exactly a year ago.

 Syrian kids wait to receive medical treatment after Assad regime forces allegedly conducted a poisonous gas attack on Duma, Eastern Ghouta in Damascus, Syria on April 07, 2018. Fadi Abdullah / Getty Images

In that case, the president ordered the bombing of the runway in Syria from which, the U.S. said, planes carrying the chemicals took off, even as he was hosting China’s President Xi Jinpeng in Mar-a-Lago. (And said he’d informed his guest of the military strike at dinner “over the most beautiful piece of chocolate cake you’d ever seen.”) U.S officials acknowledged that the runway was quickly rebuilt.

Clearly, last year’s strike did not deter Assad’s subsequent reported use of chemicals over the past year, and again this weekend, as alleged by opposition groups and medical teams from the White Helmets. Now the question is whether the condemnation today from Trump — who does not like to appear to be defied — will require him to launch another symbolic air strike, or take even stronger military action to avoid appearing weak on the global stage.

It is not clear what impact the reported atrocity will have on Trump’s expressed hope for an exit strategy from Syria, which is not only riling the Pentagon, but also alarming key allies including Israel and France. The Syrian situation, along with the Iran nuclear deal and proposed U.S tariffs against the European Union, were already going to be contentious issues that could spoil the first state visit in the Trump administration when France’s President Emmanuel Macron arrives in Washington in a few weeks.

There was a third irony in the president’s Sunday Twitter outburst. In his tweets, he blamed Iran and, importantly, Russia, without whose military intervention in 2015 Assad could not have survived. It was the first time he had strongly criticized Russian President Vladimir Putin in a tweet.

Related

But Trump also held President Barack Obama responsible for Assad, tweeting Sunday, “If President Obama had crossed his stated Red Line in The Sand, the Syrian disaster would have ended long ago! Animal Assad would have been history!”

Indeed, there was a torrent of criticism against Obama for not taking military action against Assad over Labor Day weekend in 2013 in response to his use of chemical weapons in the civil war, severely undermining then-Secretary of State John Kerry, who had publicly telegraphed that a military response was imminent.

But now Trump has created his own red line against Assad, this time without a confirmed secretary of state and just as a new national security adviser is taking over on Monday. And as he is increasingly ignoring the advice of his chief of staff, retired Gen. John Kelly, and resisting policies on Syria advocated by Defense Secretary James Mattis, a retired four-star Marine.

Add to the confusion his recent, seemingly ad-libbed suggestion of inviting Putin, Assad’s protector, to the the White House. It all leaves Trump facing a complex series of military and foreign policy challenges that could confound the most adroit and well-staffed commander-in-chief.

In the days to come, Trump may well discover the perils of conducting foreign policy on Twitter.



Source link

Politics

Corbyn launches all-out assault on Starmer in call for radical action on eve of conference

Published

on

JEREMY CORBYN launched an embittered assault on Sir Keir Starmer on the eve of Labour’s annual conference, attacking his successor for “propping up a broken system”.

Source link

Continue Reading

Politics

Biden will allow Jan. 6 investigators access to Trump records, White House says

Published

on

President Joe Biden will not shield Donald Trump’s records from the congressional committee investigating the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol by invoking executive privilege, White House press secretary Jen Psaki said Friday.

Asked about Trump’s assertion that he would fight subpoenas from the Jan. 6 Select Committee by invoking the presidential power, Psaki said that decision ultimately lies with Biden.

“The president has already concluded that it would not be appropriate to assert executive privilege” in this case, Psaki said.

“We take this matter incredibly seriously,” she added.

While sitting presidents have traditionally used the power to shield certain information and records from the public at the request of their predecessors, Psaki said what happened during the Capitol riot deserves transparency.

“We have been working closely with the congressional committee and others as they get to the bottom of what happened on Jan. 6th, an incredibly dark day in our democracy,” Psaki said at the daily briefing.

Her comments came one day after the committee subpoenaed and set a date for sworn depositions for several top Trump allies — former White House strategist Steve Bannon, former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, former social media director Dan Scavino and Kashyap Patel, who was chief of staff to Trump’s defense secretary.

Trump said in a statement Thursday that, “We will fight the subpoenas on executive privilege and other grounds, for the good of our country.” He also referred to the fact-finding panel as the “‘Unselect Committee’ of highly partisan politicians.”

Biden’s stance should make the panel’s path easier, but Trump could still file a legal challenge the committee’s push to get his records from the National Archives.

The panel’s document request to the National Archives is 10 pages long and seeks “documents and communications within the White House on January 6, 2021” related to Trump’s advisers and family members. It also asks for his specific movements on that day and communications, if any, from the White House Situation Room.

To date, over 600 people have been charged criminally for the Jan. 6 riot.

The Associated Press contributed.

Source link

Continue Reading

Politics

State pension chaos as people left stranded on NO income

Published

on

STATE pensions have been thrown into chaos by a backlog at the Department for Work and Pensions .

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending