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Does Trump have the power to send National Guard troops to the border?

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State National Guard personnel are not subject to the PCA. In 2004, Congress passed a law that previous administrations have used to allow the federal government to fund National Guard troops participating in border security operations triggered by “homeland defense activity” under Title 32, according to a 2013 Congressional Research Report.

NBC News reported Wednesday that it is unlikely the Guard troops will have physical contact with immigrants at the border. The exact number of troops and how long they will be deployed to the border will be firmed up in the coming days, officials said.

Can states say no?

Border states can fund and send their own National Guard troops to secure their borders, though historically many have requested Title 32 efforts so that the federal government, not the states, picks up the tab.

They can also refuse to send troops, as then-Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, R-Calif., did in 2006 when Bush requested that his state more than double the number of National Guard personnel deployed to the border.

What are states saying about Trump’s plan?

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said Wednesday the administration had already started talking with states about utilizing their National Guard.

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey and Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, both border-state Republicans, welcomed the deployments, while a spokesman for California Gov. Jerry Brown, a Democrat who has been sharply critical of the president, told reporters the request will be reviewed promptly.

Oregon’s Democratic Gov. Kate Brown said she would say no, as did fellow Democratic Montana Gov. Steve Bullock, The Associated Press reported.

Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval, a Republican, indicated that he would oppose the request through a spokesperson Friday, according to The Associated Press. The spokesperson told the AP that Sandoval doesn’t think it would be “an appropriate use” of the Nevada Guard.

Why does the president want to send troops?

On Easter, the president started tweeting about dangerous “caravans” of migrants marching through Mexico toward the U.S. The group he referred to was actually a planned, annual procession of migrants fleeing violence in Central America organized by Pueblo Sin Fronteras. Some of the migrants planned to seek asylum in the U.S. as they were fleeing extreme violence in their home countries — and they would have been stopped or apprehended at the border accordingly, immigration experts said.

The president said this was a dangerous situation, and blamed congressional Democrats for not passing stricter immigration laws and funding his planned border wall. Later, Trump said he’d use the military to protect the border.



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UK farming chief invited to EU meeting but stunned by attitude – 'They want us in pain!'

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A SCOTTISH farming boss has exposed the level of Brexit animosity after being left stunned by the European Commission’s attitude following a crunch meeting with the Brussels bloc, warning: “They want us to feel pain.”

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Brexit LIVE: This ISN'T good enough! UK turns tables on EU and threatens to suspend deal

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BORIS JOHNSON has threatened to suspend the post-Brexit trade deal agreed with the EU as talks with the bloc on the Northern Ireland protocol reach a stalemate.

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UK bounceback begins: British economy GREW 2.1% in March despite lockdown hell

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BRITAIN’S economy grew by 2.1 percent in March despite many lockdown restrictions remaining in place.

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