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Does Trump have the power to send National Guard troops to the border?

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State National Guard personnel are not subject to the PCA. In 2004, Congress passed a law that previous administrations have used to allow the federal government to fund National Guard troops participating in border security operations triggered by “homeland defense activity” under Title 32, according to a 2013 Congressional Research Report.

NBC News reported Wednesday that it is unlikely the Guard troops will have physical contact with immigrants at the border. The exact number of troops and how long they will be deployed to the border will be firmed up in the coming days, officials said.

Can states say no?

Border states can fund and send their own National Guard troops to secure their borders, though historically many have requested Title 32 efforts so that the federal government, not the states, picks up the tab.

They can also refuse to send troops, as then-Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, R-Calif., did in 2006 when Bush requested that his state more than double the number of National Guard personnel deployed to the border.

What are states saying about Trump’s plan?

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said Wednesday the administration had already started talking with states about utilizing their National Guard.

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey and Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, both border-state Republicans, welcomed the deployments, while a spokesman for California Gov. Jerry Brown, a Democrat who has been sharply critical of the president, told reporters the request will be reviewed promptly.

Oregon’s Democratic Gov. Kate Brown said she would say no.

Why does the president want to send troops?

On Easter, the president started tweeting about dangerous “caravans” of migrants marching through Mexico toward the U.S. The group he referred to was actually a planned, annual procession of migrants fleeing violence in Central America organized by Pueblo Sin Fronteras. Some of the migrants planned to seek asylum in the U.S. as they were fleeing extreme violence in their home countries — and they would have been stopped or apprehended at the border accordingly, immigration experts said.

The president said this was a dangerous situation, and blamed congressional Democrats for not passing stricter immigration laws and funding his planned border wall. Later, Trump said he’d use the military to protect the border.



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Corbyn launches all-out assault on Starmer in call for radical action on eve of conference

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JEREMY CORBYN launched an embittered assault on Sir Keir Starmer on the eve of Labour’s annual conference, attacking his successor for “propping up a broken system”.

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Biden will allow Jan. 6 investigators access to Trump records, White House says

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President Joe Biden will not shield Donald Trump’s records from the congressional committee investigating the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol by invoking executive privilege, White House press secretary Jen Psaki said Friday.

Asked about Trump’s assertion that he would fight subpoenas from the Jan. 6 Select Committee by invoking the presidential power, Psaki said that decision ultimately lies with Biden.

“The president has already concluded that it would not be appropriate to assert executive privilege” in this case, Psaki said.

“We take this matter incredibly seriously,” she added.

While sitting presidents have traditionally used the power to shield certain information and records from the public at the request of their predecessors, Psaki said what happened during the Capitol riot deserves transparency.

“We have been working closely with the congressional committee and others as they get to the bottom of what happened on Jan. 6th, an incredibly dark day in our democracy,” Psaki said at the daily briefing.

Her comments came one day after the committee subpoenaed and set a date for sworn depositions for several top Trump allies — former White House strategist Steve Bannon, former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, former social media director Dan Scavino and Kashyap Patel, who was chief of staff to Trump’s defense secretary.

Trump said in a statement Thursday that, “We will fight the subpoenas on executive privilege and other grounds, for the good of our country.” He also referred to the fact-finding panel as the “‘Unselect Committee’ of highly partisan politicians.”

Biden’s stance should make the panel’s path easier, but Trump could still file a legal challenge the committee’s push to get his records from the National Archives.

The panel’s document request to the National Archives is 10 pages long and seeks “documents and communications within the White House on January 6, 2021” related to Trump’s advisers and family members. It also asks for his specific movements on that day and communications, if any, from the White House Situation Room.

To date, over 600 people have been charged criminally for the Jan. 6 riot.

The Associated Press contributed.

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State pension chaos as people left stranded on NO income

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STATE pensions have been thrown into chaos by a backlog at the Department for Work and Pensions .

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