Connect with us

World

Zimbabwe’s President Emmerson Mnangagwa makes first China state visit

Published

on

Zimbabwe's President Emmerson Mnangagwa (L) shakes hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, on April 3, 2018.

Zimbabwe’s President Emmerson Mnangagwa (L) shakes hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, on April 3, 2018.

Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa touched down in China this week for a five-day state visit which could bear fruits for his country’s troubled economy.

Prior to the trip, Mnangagwa outlined his economic agenda in an interview with China’s state-run news outlet Xinhua. “The issue is not only about attracting capital into Zimbabwe. It’s an issue of leapfrogging after 18 years of isolation so that we catch up with the rest of the developing countries,” he said on Sunday.

The trip, which takes place from Monday to Friday of this week, is Mnangagwa’s first state visit outside of Africa since taking over from Robert Mugabe. Mnangagwa met his Chinese counterpart President Xi Jinping on Tuesday.

“We must have deeper economic relations with China. We know the road that we need to follow to grow our economy,” he said. Mnangagwa also spoke of his intention to reassure Chinese investors of “the security of investment that we have created in our own jurisdiction.”

Zimbabwe and China’s relationship dates back to 1979, in which China provided former President Robert Mugabe’s guerrilla fighters with weapons and training in the Rhodesian Bush War — part of Zimbabwe’s fight for independence from its British colonial government. Both Mugabe and his successor Mnangagwa have been described as friends by the Chinese government.

Mnangagwa visited China in the 1960s for military training.

Source link

World

Former ambassador warns expiration of key nuclear treaty with Russia would make the U.S. ‘worse off’

Published

on

The Biden administration has pushed to extend the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty, or New START, with Russia for five years, which is set to expire on Feb. 5. The nuclear agreement regulates and limits how many nuclear weapons each country can have. Russian officials on Friday said they welcome the news. 

Michael McFaul told CNBC’s “The News with Shepard Smith” that the expiration of New START with Russia would make the U.S. “worse off.” 

“We would lose our verification ability to look inside and look at Russia’s nuclear arsenal,” said McFaul, who served as U.S. Ambassador to Russia from 2012 to 2014. “Remember Ronald Reagan used to say, ‘Trust but verify?’ I say don’t trust, only verify, and the New START treaty allows us to do this. I think it is the right decision by the new Biden team to extend it.”

Joel Rubin is a former Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Legislative Affairs, where he worked with members of Congress on multiple national security issues, including nuclear security. He agreed with McFaul and told “The News with Shepard Smith” that the accord stabilizes relations between the two nuclear powers. 

“The Trump Administration tried to use its delay of renewal of the treaty as leverage but failed to get anything in return, putting the entire treaty at risk,” said Rubin, who was also the Policy Director for Ploughshares Fund, the country’s leading nuclear security foundation. “We need stability between the U.S. and Russia, who combined hold more than 90% of the world’s nuclear weapons. Renewal of New START will do that.”

Relations between Moscow and the U.S. are fraught amid the massive cyberattack targeting federal agencies, interference in U.S. elections, and the recent arrest of the Russian opposition leader Alexie Navalny. President Joe Biden will ask his Director of National Intelligence Avril Haines to review Russia’s interference in the 2020 election, according to the Washington Post

McFaul told host Shepard Smith that he thinks the response against Russia will likely be sanctions, but that the Biden administration has choices when it comes to penalties against Russia.

“The easy thing to do is to sanction a bunch of no-name colonels, FSB, the successor group to the KGB, and check the box,” McFaul said. “The more bold move would be to sanction some of those that enable the Putin regime, including some of the economic oligarchs that support Putin.”

Rubin added that the U.S. should also work closely with European and Asian allies to pressure Russia to change and address its internal repression and its aggressive international behavior, “rather than push them away and reduce the diplomatic pressure on Russia, as the Trump Administration did.”

McFaul told Smith that he wasn’t sure if President Joe Biden wanted to expend the political capital to get tougher with Russia, because of domestic issues that the U.S. is facing, including Covid and an economic crisis. McFaul added, however, he believes it’s possible for Biden to do both. 

“I think you could walk and chew gum at the same time, I think you should be able to do both at the same time, but we’ll have to wait and see what they choose to do,” McFaul said.  

Rubin told “The News with Shepard Smith”  that he thinks it’s time for the U.S. to be “hard headed” when it comes to Russia and President Vladimir Putin. 

“We should neither be afraid of nor kowtow to Moscow any longer, nor should we expect that we can make US-Russia relations better through kid gloves diplomacy,” Rubin said.

Source link

Continue Reading

World

Biden says nothing can change the trajectory of the Covid pandemic over the next several months

Published

on

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks about his administration’s plans to respond to the economic crisis during a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) response event in the State Dining Room at the White House in Washington, January 22, 2021.

Jonathan Ernst | Reuters

President Joe Biden has painted a bleak picture of the nation’s coronavirus outbreak in his first few days in office, warning that it will take months to turn around the pandemic’s trajectory and that fatalities are expected to dramatically rise over the next few weeks.

“A lot of America is hurting. The virus is surging. We’re 400,000 dead expected to reach well over 600,000,” Biden said on Friday before signing two executive orders designed to reduce hunger and bolster workers’ rights amid the pandemic.

The U.S. surpassed 400,000 total Covid-19 deaths on Tuesday, with a quarter of those coming over the previous 36 days, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University. On Biden’s first full day as president on Thursday, he told reporters following a meeting with his Covid-19 advisors, including Dr. Anthony Fauci, that the nation would likely top 500,000 Covid-19 deaths in February.

Biden warned on Friday that as the outbreak continues, “there’s nothing we can do to change the trajectory of the pandemic in the next several months.” The president has repeatedly warned that the situation is likely to worsen before it improves.

The United States has reported a decline in Covid-19 cases in recent days, a glimmer of hope following a surge since the fall and through the winter holiday season. The U.S. is reporting an average of roughly 187,593 new Covid-19 cases daily, a 22% decline compared with a week ago, according to a CNBC analysis of Johns Hopkins data.

However, the nation is still “in a very serious situation,” Fauci said during his first White House press briefing appearance under the new administration on Thursday, noting the country’s high death toll and strained hospital capacity.

Fauci said that the daily number of cases, based on a weekly average, appears to be plateauing and turning around. It’s possible that the dip could still be because of a reduced reporting following the holidays, he added.

“When we see that, we think it’s real,” Fauci said.

This is a developing story. Please check back later for updates.

Source link

Continue Reading

World

Tesla job openings for Semi truck production lines in Nevada

Published

on

Tesla CEO Elon Musk shows off the Tesla Semi as he unveils the company’s new electric semi truck during a presentation in Hawthorne, California, U.S., November 16, 2017.

Alexandria Sage | Reuters

Recent job listings show that Tesla is moving ahead with its long-delayed plans for its electric Semi truck, an initiative it first unveiled in 2017.

Three current job listings call for employees to work on “Semi-Truck production lines” in Sparks, Nevada. That’s where Tesla already makes batteries for its electric vehicles, in partnership with Panasonic.

Tesla announced the Semi in November 2017, and said at the time that it would deliver the trucks to customers in about two years. At that time, the company said it would sell a 300-mile range version of the Semi for $150,000, and a 500-mile range version for $180,000, and that the trucks would go from 0-60 miles per hour in 5 seconds without cargo, or 0-60 in 20 seconds with an 80,000 pound load.

After taking reservations for the trucks from companies such as Anheuser-Busch, DHL Group, PepsiCo, Pride Group and Walmart, Tesla announced Semi production delays during a third-quarter earnings call in 2019, and again in April 2020.

In June 2020, Musk sent an e-mail to all employees at Tesla that called for “volume production” of the Semi.

“It’s time to go all out and bring the Tesla Semi to volume production. It’s been in limited production so far, which has allowed us to improve many aspects of the design.” Musk also said in that memo, “Production of the battery and powertrain would take place at Giga Nevada, with most of the other work probably occurring in other states.”

But in the company’s third-quarter 2020 financial filing, Tesla only mentioned its Semi initiative twice, saying it was “in development,” and noting U.S. locations for Semi production were yet to be determined.

More recently, in an interview at the European Conference on Batteries November 24, 2020, Musk boasted that Tesla was aiming for a Semi that could go even further on a single charge than originally promised, saying “You could take the range, for long-range trucking, easily up to 800 kilometers and we see a path over time to get to 1,000 kilometer range with a heavy duty truck.”

The company has a few prototype Semi trucks that have been in operation for over a year. But Musk has not disclosed when full-fledged production of the Semi, or longer range batteries for it, could begin.

Today, Tesla is taking $20,000 refundable reservations to order a Semi. (It initially required $5,000 per reservation.) The base price for a 300-mile range version is listed at $150,000, and for a 500-mile range at $180,000. Prospective customers can also order a “Founders Series” Semi for $200,000.

Meanwhile, Daimler is in small-scale production with its heavy duty eCascadia electric trucks in the U.S., and Quebec-based Lion Electric has plans for a SPAC, a new U.S. factory, and has inked a deal to deliver up to 2,500 battery-powered electric trucks to Amazon over the next five years.

Investors will likely press Tesla for details on the status of its Semi program on its Q4 2020 earnings call on Jan. 27.

Tesla did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending