Connect with us

Latest News

China imposes additional tariffs in response to U.S. duties on steel, aluminum

Published

on

“China’s suspension of its tariff concessions is a legitimate action adopted under WTO rules to safeguard China’s interests,” the Chinese finance ministry said.

China has imposed the additional tariffs amid escalating trade tensions between Beijing and Washington, sparking fears of a full-blown trade spat between the world’s two biggest economies.

U.S. President Donald Trump is preparing to impose tariffs of more than $50 billion on Chinese goods intended to punish Beijing over U.S. accusations that China systematically misappropriated American intellectual property — allegations Beijing denies.

Related

China has repeatedly promised to open its economy further, but many foreign companies continue to complain of unfair treatment. China warned the United States on Thursday not to open a Pandora’s Box and spark a flurry of protectionist practices across the globe.

In a statement published on Monday morning, MOFCOM said the United States had “seriously violated” the principles of non-discrimination enshrined in World Trade Organization rules, and had also damaged China’s interests.

“China’s suspension of some of its obligations to the United States is its legitimate right as a member of the World Trade Organization,” it said, adding that differences between the world’s two largest economies should be resolved through dialogue and negotiation.

Source link

Latest News

Mexican police and soldiers wanted over unsolved disappearance of 43 students | World News

Published

on

Mexican authorities have issued dozens of arrest warrants for police and soldiers they believe were involved in the still-unsolved disappearance of 43 college students six years ago.

On 26 September 2014, students training to be teachers at a college in the southern state of Guerrero were allegedly kidnapped and turned over to a local gang.

Four months later, an investigation found the students had been burned in a huge fire at a garbage dump, with some remains thrown into a river.

A relative of a missing student holds a poster with his image as she walks past a "+43" sign painted on the ground, during a protest outside the Attorney General's office, before the sixth anniversary of the disappearance of 43 students of the Ayotzinapa Teacher Training College, in Mexico City, Mexico September 25, 2020. REUTERS/Henry Romero
Image:
Families attend a protest near the attorney general’s office

But many of the families did not believed the story and experts found holes in it, noting it failed to come up with any definitive account of what happened.

On Saturday, lead investigator Omar Gomez told reporters that warrants had been issued for the “material and intellectual authors” of the crime, including military members as well as federal and municipal police.

It marks the first time Mexican authorities have announced arrest warrants for military personnel in connection with the disappearance of the students.

The remains of only two of them have been found.

Many of the suspects initially arrested in the case were later released, and many claimed they had been tortured by police or the military.

In March, a judge issued an arrest warrant for Tomas Zeron, the former head of investigations for Mexico’s attorney general’s office, for alleged violations in the investigation of the case.

Zeron – who was at the centre of the earlier investigation – and five other former officials face charges including torture, forced disappearance and judicial misconduct.

Mexico's President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, Mexico's Undersecretary of Human Rights Alejandro Encinas and Maria Martinez, mother of Miguel Angel Hernandez Martinez, hold pieces of fabric embroidered by relatives of the 43 missing students of the Ayotzinapa Teacher Training College, as they attend the delivery of an investigation report with marking the 6th anniversary of their disappearance. REUTERS/Edgard Garrido
Image:
The warrants were issued during a press conference in the Mexican capital

The unsolved disappearances have sparked outrage in the country over the years, with massive protests in 2014.

There has also been international condemnation of what is seen one of the darkest examples of the government’s longstanding difficulty preventing violence or convicting criminals.

Family members of the victims have long accused Mexican authorities, including the military, of complicity.

The mother of one of the students, Maria Martinez Zeferino, said at Saturday’s press conference in Mexico City that “the military participated”.

“There were videos of it,” she claimed.

Source link

Continue Reading

Latest News

Canadian man who claimed to be IS killer charged with lying about terrorism | World News

Published

on

A Canadian man who claimed he was an Islamic State killer has been charged with lying about his terrorist activity.

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) said the charge against Shehroze Chaudhry stems from numerous media interviews in which he described travelling to Syria in 2016 and committing acts of extremism.

Islamic State fighters take part in a military parade in Raqqa province in June, 2014
Image:
Islamic State fighters take part in a military parade in Raqqa province in Syria in June 2014. File pic

Chaudhry, 25, from Burlington, Ontario, reportedly portrayed himself as a former IS member living freely in Canada.

He has been posting on social media and telling reporters and others since 2016 that he was a former member of the jihadist group’s religious police in Syria, according to Canadian media.

He claimed to have conducted at least two executions on the group’s behalf and gained further notoriety by appearing on The New York Times’ Caliphate podcast, describing in detail the grisly murders of innocent civilians, some blindfolded and tied-up – provoking outrage in the Canadian parliament.

He said he was known within the terror group by his jihadi alias, Abu Huzaifa al-Kanadi (Abu Huzaifa the Canadian), and that he started out in the Syrian city of Manbij.

Choudhry reportedly recalled witnessing violence such as regular public lashings, beheadings and crucifixions, and claimed he suffered from nightmares.

His media interviews led opposition politicians to question whether the federal government was doing enough to protect Canadians from IS fighters who have returned to Canada.

But now, the RCMP has accused him of perpetrating a hoax related to terrorist activity.

Superintendent Christopher deGale said in a statement: “Hoaxes can generate fear within our communities and create the illusion there is a potential threat to Canadians while we have determined otherwise.

“As a result, the RCMP takes these allegations very seriously, particularly when individuals, by their actions, cause the police to enter into investigations in which human and financial resources are invested and diverted from other ongoing priorities.”

Chaudhry will appear in court on 16 November and, if convicted, could face up to five years in jail, CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) reports.

Federal police have also announced terrorism charges against an unnamed 30-year-old man from Alberta, who detectives allege joined IS in 2013 and committed acts of terrorism including kidnapping.

Source link

Continue Reading

Latest News

Coronavirus: Two million global deaths ‘not impossible’ even with vaccine, warns WHO | World News

Published

on

The number of global coronavirus deaths could reach two million before a vaccine is found and widely used, the World Health Organisation has warned.

It comes as the death toll in the nine months since the coronavirus emerged in Wuhan, China, nears one million.

Dr Mike Ryan, director of the WHO’s emergencies programme, said the figure could be higher without concerted action to curb the pandemic.

“It’s certainly unimaginable,” he told a briefing. “But it’s not impossible, because if we look at losing a million people in nine months and then we just look at the realities of getting a vaccine out there in the next nine months, it’s a big task for everyone involved.

“There’s the issue of funding these vaccines. There’s the issue of distributing these vaccines and then the issues of acceptance.

“And beyond that, with the work we still have to do in controlling this disease. And remember, we have things we can do now to drive transmission down and drive down the number of deaths.”

Dr Ryan said there was a “worrying” spike of COVID-19 infections across Europe, which have triggered local lockdowns.

These are in part due to improved and rigorous testing, he added.

“But what is worrying to us is an increase in hospitalisations and an increase in bed occupancy for hospitalisations and also in ICU. We’re at the end of September, not even towards the end of September, and we haven’t even started our flu season yet,” he said.

“So what we are worried about is the possibility that these trends are going in the wrong direction. Now, on the other hand, we are in a much different situation now than we were in a few months ago. We have tools in place to be able to reduce transmission and to save lives.”



WHO chief cautions against vaccine nationalism







‘Vaccine nationalism will prolong pandemic’

Infections have risen to almost 32.5 million, according to Johns Hopkins University, which has been tracking the coronavirus outbreak.

Many countries are experiencing a second surge as winter approaches.

It is unknown what impact the cold months will have on the disease, and how it will interact with other seasonal respiratory viruses.

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending