Connect with us

Latest News

Anti-apartheid campaigner Winnie Mandela dies, aged 81

Published

on

The South African anti-apartheid campaigner Winnie Madikizela-Mandela has died, aged 81, her personal assistant confirmed.

Her family said she died “peacefully” after a long illness.

They said she had been “in and out of hospital since the start of the year”.

Winnie Madikizela Mandela, ex-wife of former South African president Nelson Mandela
Image:
Winnie Madikizela Mandela, ex-wife of former South African president Nelson Mandela

In a statement, her family said: “Mrs Madikizela-Mandela was one of the greatest icons of the struggle against Apartheid. She fought valiantly against the Apartheid state and sacrificed her life for the freedom of the country.

“Her activism and resistance to Apartheid landed her in jail on numerous occasions‚ eventually causing her banishment to the small town of Brandfort in the then Orange Free State.

“She kept the memory of her imprisoned husband Nelson Mandela alive during his years on Robben Island and helped give the Struggle for justice in South Africa one its most recognisable faces.

“She dedicated most of her adult life to the cause of the people and for this was known far and wide as the Mother Of The Nation.”

Winnie Mandela has died aged 81
Image:
Winnie Mandela has died aged 81

They urged supporters to celebrate the gift of her life.

Mrs Madikizela-Mandela was married to the late Nelson Mandela for nearly four decades until 1996.

He spent much of their marriage in prison, and she campaigned tirelessly for his release, eventually securing on 11 February 1990.

Mrs Madikizela-Mandela was convicted in 1991 of killing an activist named Stompie Seipei who was found near her home with his throat cut.

Winnie Mandela (L), and Nelson Mandela's widow Graca Machel (C), stand by his coffin in 2013
Image:
Winnie Mandela (L), and Nelson Mandela’s widow Graca Machel (C), stand by his coffin in 2013

She was sentenced to six years in prison, but it was reduced on appeal.

The couple separated in 1992, and he sacked her from his cabinet three years later after allegations of corruption. She took her new surname, Madikizela-Mandela, after their divorce.

She built her own role as a grassroots activist, completing university at a time when very few black women in South Africa did so, and was politicised by her work as a social worker in a Johannesburg hospital.

Despite controversy and convictions, she was able to rehabilitate her political career, winning a seat in the 2009 elections.

She once accused her former husband of agreeing to a “bad deal for the blacks” but was a regular visitor to his bedside and even with him when he died.

Mrs Madikizela-Mandela and Mr Mandela had two daughters.

More follows…

Source link

Latest News

Too scared to go back inside their homes: Aftermath of Turkey’s deadly earthquake | World News

Published

on

The neighbourhood of Bayrakli in the Aegean city of Izmir is new compared to the rest of the century-old city.

Developed at the start of the 2000s, it’s a mixture of middle class housing and swanky office towers.

But 20 of those buildings have now collapsed. Most on their sides, four just crumbled in on themselves. They are all just a few hundred metres from each other.

With several others seriously damaged, people are being warned by police officers to stay away from cordoned-off areas, fearing a tremor could cause another collapse.

Locals watched as buildings collapsed in on themselves
Image:
Locals watched as buildings collapsed in on themselves

It seems like a regular Friday night, but as I get closer, the crowds of people and cars parked both sides of the road to get closer to the rescue site are striking.

People are stood outside and sat in nearby cafes, packing up their cars to spend the night with relatives or at second homes in resort towns nearby.

One small family-of-three chose to stay in their car with their seven-year-old daughters.

Their building was so severely damaged they couldn’t get back into their apartment.

People found in the rubble are being sent to two different hospitals
Image:
People found in the rubble are being sent to two different hospitals

Everyone seems scared to go back inside their homes – especially those who live close to the areas that suffered the most damage.

I arrive at one block and only rubble remains of the seven-floor building.

Before there were 28 apartments, but now nothing but a mountain of dust and concrete can be seen.

A young father and his son are watching the rescue operation closely and attract my attention.

Asked if he lived in the building, the father said: “No I live just next door but our friends live here and they are missing their daughter.”

Many are too scared to go back inside for fear their buildings will collapse too
Image:
Many are too scared to go back inside for fear their buildings will collapse too

Elif Inan is nine and was home alone when the earthquake hit.

Her parents were at work and there was no one else with her.

Her mother is in deep distress, she sits on a folded chair, held by her friend and relatives.

She sees pieces of furniture in the rubble and rushes to the teams on the ground asking if Elif could be close by.

Twenty buildings collapsed in Bayrakli
Image:
Twenty buildings collapsed in Bayrakli
People are warned by police officers to stay away from the rescue site
Image:
People are warned by police officers to stay away from the rescue site

She is sent back to safety, but all she wants is just one glimmer of hope, some information about what could have happened.

Could Elif still be down there? Maybe she got out and is in hospital.

An official from the rescue operation comes to tell her that her daughter might have been taken to one of the two hospitals where those found in the rubble are being sent.

She stays on the folding chair outside the building while her husband goes to check the hospitals.

Further away I could see small groups scattered along the street sitting on chairs and looking at the same building.

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player

Moment building collapses after quake

This 75-year-old man is called Yaşar Koza,

He had just stepped out to buy some bread. But when he came back his home was gone.

“I just saw a huge cloud of dust and my home was gone,” he told Sky News.

His wife could still be alive, he hopes.

“No one gives me any information, she might be in the hospital but I do not know. I cannot leave, she could still be under the concrete,” he says.

Source link

Continue Reading

Latest News

Tens of thousands protest against Poland’s near-total ban on abortion | World News

Published

on

Thousands of people defied coronavirus restrictions to protest against a near-total ban on abortion in Poland in the largest show of defiance against the new law so far.

The centre of Warsaw was overwhelmed by protesters on Friday, with mayor Rafal Trzaskowski claiming around 100,000 took part in the march.

It was the culmination of nine days of protests against a ruling by Poland’s constitutional court earlier this month that abortion in cases of severe foetal abnormalities are unconstitutional.

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player

Poland’s near-total ban on abortion explained

The 22 October decision tightens the already strict laws on abortions in Poland, which ban them unless they are the result of rape or incest, they put the mother’s life at risk, or there are foetal deformities.

Activists see it as an almost complete ban on the right to a termination – as the overwhelming majority of abortions in the country are carried out because of foetal abnormalities.

Warsaw abortion protests
Image:
Women held placards that read ‘I wish I could abort my government’

After night fell on Friday, women marched through the Polish capital with placards saying “I wish I could abort my government” and “even Shrek wouldn’t want to live in such a swamp”.

The demonstration was due to end outside the house of Jaroslaw Kaczynski – the leader of the ruling Law and Justice party – but police blocked off the street some distance from his home.

Warsaw abortion protests
Image:
Police officers turned out in large numbers to patrol the demonstration

There was a large police presence as far right activists and football hooligans emerged to stage a counter-protest.

Twelve people were arrested, local police said.

Over the past week, church services have been disrupted and priests confronted as activists hit out at the new Roman Catholic-influenced policy.

Warsaw abortion protests
Image:
Activists see this month’s court ruling as a near-total ban on abortion

But the vast majority of the protests have passed peacefully, with music, dancing and men showing up in solidarity, sporting the red lightning bolt symbol that has come to represent the movement.

Klementyna Suchanow, one of the key organisers of the Poland’s Women’s Strike initiative, said she and many others refuse to be deterred by COVID-19 rules that ban groups of more than five.

Warsaw abortion protests
Image:
Protesters light flares in Warsaw on Friday

She said the ruling is a breach of human rights, adding: “This is about the freedom and dignity of people. The will of people to protest should be a lesson for anyone who wants to impose authoritarian ways.”

The government denies any human rights breaches. Poland’s abortion law – among the strictest in the world – was forged by political and Catholic church leaders in 1993 after the fall of communism.

Source link

Continue Reading

Latest News

Nineteen dead and more than 700 injured after earthquake strikes Turkey and Greece | World News

Published

on

An earthquake has killed at least 19 people and injured 700 in Turkey and on the Greek island of Samos.

In Izmir, Turkey’s third largest city, 17 people died after the tremor.

Latest updates from Turkey and Greece after major earthquake

Map of where magnitude 7 earthquake hit between Turkey and Greek Islands on 30/10/2020
Image:
The earthquake hit west of Turkey and north of Samos

The two people killed by the magnitude 7 quake on Samos were a teenage boy and girl found near a collapsed wall.

The epicentre of the tremor was in the Aegean Sea, 11 miles (17 km) off the coast of Turkey‘s Izmir province, at a depth of 10 miles (16km).

The shock was felt across the region, including in Istanbul, the Greek islands, and as far as the Greek capital Athens and also in Bulgaria.

Water surged into the Seferihisar district south of Izmir, the city home to around 4.5 million people and worst hit by the earthquake.

In Izmir, witnesses said people poured onto the streets in panic following the quake. The city’s mayor said nearly 20 buildings had collapsed.

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player

Aerial footage shows extent of quake damage

Turkey’s health minister Fahrettin Koca said that 38 ambulances, two helicopters and 35 medical rescue teams were involved in the operation.

Footage from the area showed flattened buildings and survivors being pulled from the rubble by emergency workers.

Izmir’s governor said 70 people had been rescued from the ruins.

Local people and officials search for survivors in Izmir
Image:
Local people and officials search for survivors in Izmir
People search for survivors at a collapsed building in Izmir
Image:
People search for survivors at a collapsed building in Izmir

Student Ilke Cide said he went inland after waters rose following the quake.

“I am very used to earthquakes… so I didn’t take it very seriously at first,” he said.

“But this time it was really scary.”

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player

Quake reduces building to rubble in Izmir

A tsunami warning has been issued, with residents on the nearby Greek island of Samos, which has a population of about 45,000, told to stay away from the coast.

Water rose above the dock in the main harbour of Samos and flooded the street, and residents were also told to stay away from buildings as aftershocks rattled the area.

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player

Plumes of dust thrown up by collapsing buildings

Local officials reported damage to buildings and part of the popular holiday island’s road network, while eight people were slightly injured and the two teenagers were pronounced dead after being found unconscious in the town of Vathy.

Samos’ vice-mayor George Dionysiou said: “We have never experienced anything like it. People are panicking.”

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player

Strong quake flattens buildings in Turkey

In a statement, UK Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said he is “deeply distressed by the scenes of destruction” caused by the earthquake.

“We stand ready to support our Turkish and Greek friends in any way they need,” he said.

Cars were destroyed on the Greek island of Samos
Image:
Cars were destroyed on the Greek island of Samos

Greek seismologist Efthymios Lekkas described the tremor as a “very big earthquake”, adding that it was “difficult to have a bigger one”.

On Twitter, Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis said he had called Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan to offer condolences over the death toll in Izmir.

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player

Flood carries furniture through Turkish street

“Whatever our differences, these are times when our people need to stand together,” he tweeted.

The president of the European Council, Charles Michel, said the EU also “stands ready to provide support”.

“Closely following the developments of the strong earthquake that hit the Aegean Sea off Greece and Turkey. My thoughts are with all the people affected. EU stands ready to provide support,” he tweeted.

Rescuers and local volunteers carry a wounded victim on a stretcher from a collapsed building after a powerful earthquake struck Turkey's western coast and parts of Greece, in Izmir, on October 30, 2020. - A powerful earthquake hit Turkey and Greece on October 30, killing at least six people, levelling buildings and creating a sea surge that flooded streets near the Turkish resort city of Izmir. Via Getty Image
Image:
A wounded victim is rescued

Crisscrossed by major fault lines, Turkey is among the most earthquake-prone countries in the world.

More than 17,000 people were killed in August 1999 when a 7.6 magnitude quake struck Izmit, a city southeast of Istanbul.

In 2011, a quake in the eastern city of Van killed more than 500.

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending