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Trump ally detained, served with Mueller subpoena at Boston airport

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He said they told him it was a felony to lie to the FBI and he told them he would “gladly” cooperate with them. According to Malloch, the agents also produced a document allowing them to seize and search his cellphone.

At first, said Malloch, the agents questioned him about his career, showed him a color photograph of himself, and asked about his affection for the Philadelphia Eagles.

Then, said Malloch, “The questions got more detailed about my involvement in the Trump campaign (which was informal and unpaid); whom I communicated with; whom I knew and how well — they had a long list of names.”

He said they asked him about former Trump campaign adviser Roger Stone, author Jerome Corsi and WikiLeaks. Malloch said he told them he met Stone a total of three times and always with groups of people, and that Corsi had helped edit one of his books years ago.

He said he was asked if he had ever visited the Ecuadorian embassy in London, where WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has been living since 2012, and he replied no.

Malloch also said the agents served him a subpoena from Mueller’s team that had been issued that day, March 28, and that he later arranged with the Special Counsel’s Office to appear for questioning on April 13.

“What could they want from me — a policy wonk and philosophical defender of Trump?” said Malloch. “I am not an operative, have no Russia contacts, and—aside from appearing on air and in print often to defend and congratulate our President — have done nothing wrong. What message does this send?”

A spokesperson for the Special Counsel’s Office would not comment on Malloch’s statement or whether or not Malloch was questioned.

In November 2016, after Trump’s upset victory in the presidential election, Malloch told the BBC he had been consulted by Trump throughout the campaign. He told reporters in early 2017 that he had interviewed for the position of U.S. ambassador to the EU twice. That position was vacated in January 2017 and is still vacant.

The Trump administration told reporters that Malloch had never been considered for the position.

Malloch has described the EU as having “evil” origins and compared it to the Soviet Union.

A former professor at the University of Reading in the U.K. and the author of several books, he has a book coming out in May called “The Plot to Destroy Trump: How the Deep State Fabricated the Russian Dossier to Subvert the President.”

Roger Stone wrote the forward. Infowars host Alex Jones and Brexiteer Nigel Farage have written blurbs for the book cover, according to Malloch’s publisher.

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Biden holds sizable lead over Trump among Latino voters in NBC/WSJ/Telemundo poll

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Joe Biden leads President Donald Trump 62 percent to 26 percent among Latino registered voters nationally, but his lead trails Hillary Clinton’s advantage with this voting bloc at this same stage in 2016, according to a new NBC News/Wall Street Journal/Telemundo poll released Sunday.

Biden is seen by the poll’s respondents as better at addressing concerns of the Latino community, 59 percent to 18 percent, and the candidates are near even on who is better at dealing with the economy, with 41 percent saying Biden and 39 percent choosing Trump.

Biden’s 36-point lead over Trump in the presidential contest shows Democrats still have strong backing in the community, which could help Biden in some states where the presidential race is tight.

“Biden’s Latino support is greater than his performance with all voters, 51 percent of which say they would vote for him over Trump,” said Aileen Cardona-Arroyo, a senior analyst at Hart Research which conducted the poll.

But it’s clear Biden has work to do with the Hispanic electorate. In a September 2016 NBC News/Wall Street Journal/Telemundo poll, Clinton led Trump 63 percent to 16 percent with registered Hispanic voters.

Latinos are the largest non-white group of eligible voters this election at 32 million. However, the National Association of Elected and Appointed Officials has projected that about 14.6 million will vote in this year’s election that will be held amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Biden’s greatest support with Hispanic registered voters is among those 18 years old to 39 years old — 71 percent of that group backs him.

Latinos between ages 18 to 35 are about 40 percent of eligible voters in the demographic, according to the Census Bureau. Young Latino turnout has generally been lower than that of other young voters, although Latino voters 18-29 increased their turnout in the 2018 midterms.

“If you are the Biden campaign, you are looking at this in terms of opportunity for turnout because we do know that younger cohort has lower turnout levels, so it’s an opportunity there to expand the electorate, but also requires a bit of investment there,” Cardona-Arroyo said.

Although younger voters tend to be more likely to vote Democratic, “they also are a group that has to have a larger investment in terms of turning them out to vote,” she said.

Trump has some slight traction with younger Latino men, as he has with younger men throughout the electorate, Cardona-Arroyo said. Thirty-one percent of Latino men are backing Trump over Biden Trump, compared with just 22 percent of Latinas.

The poll showed high interest among registered Latino voters in the Nov. 3 election, but not as high as registered voters overall.

Sixty-seven percent of the respondents ranked their interest on a scale of 1 to 10 as 9 or 10. That is lower than all registered voters (80 percent), but higher than in Sept. 2016 (when 60 percent of Latinos chose 9 or 10).

“Interest in the election tends to go hand-in-hand with whether people are going to turn out or not,” Cardona-Arroyo said, “something both campaigns should be thinking about.”

The results are based on an oversample of 300 registered Hispanic voters in the Sept. 13-16 NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll, 70 percent of whom chose to be interviewed in English and 30 percent of whom chose Spanish, and carries a margin of error of plus or minus 5.66 percentage points.



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Suspect detained for allegedly sending ricin-tainted letter to White House

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WASHINGTON — A suspect who allegedly sent a letter containing the deadly poison ricin to the White House was detained trying to enter the United States from Canada, a federal law enforcement official said Sunday.

Additional information about the person was not immediately available.

The FBI said Saturday that it was investigating a suspicious letter addressed to President Donald Trump that had been intercepted.

It wasn’t clear when the letter was sent or where it was intercepted. Law enforcement officials said the poison, which is highly toxic and can cause nausea, vomiting, organ failure and death, was detected at an off-site facility that screens mail addressed to the White House.

The ricin was confirmed in field and laboratory tests.

The suspect allegedly sent other letters to federal prisons that were discovered in different facilities, an official told NBC News Saturday. It wasn’t immediately clear which prisons the letters were sent to or who the recipients were.

The official said only one letter appeared to be addressed to a political figure.

Pete Williams reported from Washington and Tim Stelloh from California.



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Italexit, Denmexit, Netherlandexit? – EU crisis predicted as UK sheds 'oddity' reputation

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BREXITEER Ann Widdecombe warned the EU other countries will follow Britain’s route out of the bloc in a confident prediction.

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