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Who’s been charged by Mueller in the Russia probe so far?

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Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s inquiry into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 election is ongoing – and secret.

So far, four former Trump campaign associates – Michael Flynn, Paul Manafort, Richard Gates and George Papadopoulos – have been charged, though none of the charges are directly related to any misconduct by the president’s campaign.

The special counsel filed new tax evasion and bank fraud charges against Manafort and Gates in late February, potentially increasing the amount of prison time the pair could face if convicted at trial. The charges are similar to those filed in October.

Here’s a breakdown of the charges, and a closer look at those who have faced charges throughout Mueller’s so far nearly year-long probe.

Michael Flynn

Michael Flynn, who served as Trump’s national security adviser for less than a month before resigning, was charged and pleaded guilty in December 2017 to making false statements to the FBI. 

Flynn reportedly lied about his talks with Russia’s ambassador to Washington. In late 2016, while former President Barack Obama was still in office, the two allegedly spoke about the U.S. sanctions imposed on Russia.

This raised concerns that Flynn, a retired Army lieutenant general, misled Trump officials about his conversations with Russian officials.

Paul Manafort

FILE - In this July 17, 2016 file photo, then-Trump Campaign Chairman Paul Manafort talks to reporters on the floor of the Republican National Convention at Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland as Rick Gates listens at back left. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley is considering issuing subpoenas to Manfort and two FBI officials close to fired director James Comey as part of the panel's investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 elections.(AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

Paul Manafort turned himself in to authorities in October.

 (The Associated Press)

The special counsel filed a 32-count indictment on Feb. 22 against former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort and aide Rick Gates, accusing the pair of tax evasion and bank fraud. 

The new indictment accuses Manafort and Gates of doctoring documents to inflate the income of their businesses and then using those fraudulent documents to obtain loans. It also accuses Manafort of evading taxes from 2010 through 2014 and, in some of the years, concealing his foreign bank accounts.

And on Feb. 23, a newly unsealed indictment accused Manafort of secretly paying former European politicians to lobby on behalf of Ukraine.

Manafort turned himself in to federal authorities in the fall. The 68-year-old served as Trump’s campaign manager for a few months in 2016. Gates, Manafort’s business associate, also turned himself in at the time. 

Manafort was initially charged in a 12-count indictment in connection with foreign lobbying work, and he pleaded not guilty. The charges included: conspiracy against the U.S., conspiracy to launder money, false statements, unregistered agent of a foreign principal, and multiple counts of failure to file reports of foreign bank and financial accounts, according to a special counsel’s office spokesman.

Manafort sued to have the case against him dismissed and argued that Mueller had overstepped his bounds by charging him for conduct he says is unrelated to Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Richard Gates

FILE - In this July 21, 2016 file photo, Rick Gates, campaign aide to Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.  Trump's former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, and a former business associate, Rick Gates, have been told to surrender to federal authorities Monday, according to reports and a person familiar with the matter.(AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Richard Gates pleaded not guilty to all charges.

 (The Associated Press)

Rick Gates was named alongside Manafort in the recent charges brought by the special counsel. He’s accused of 11 counts related to filing false income tax returns and three counts of failure to report foreign bank and financial accounts.

Gates pleaded guilty on Feb. 23 to federal conspiracy and false-statements charges.

In wake of the guilty plea, Mueller moved to drop the 22 bank and tax fraud charges against him. The decision to drop the more expansive charges against Gates could suggest that the former Trump campaign official is cooperating and providing good information to Mueller’s team.

Like Manafort, Gates was initially indicted in October in connection with foreign lobbying work; he pleaded not guilty at the time. His charges were similar to Manafort’s – ranging from conspiracy against the U.S. to conspiracy to launder money.

A superseding criminal complaint says Gates was charged with conspiracy against the United States between 2006 and 2017.

George Papadopoulos

george papadopoulos

George Papadopoulos pleaded guilty to the charges against him.

 (Alexandria Sheriff’s Office)

A former foreign policy adviser to Trump’s presidential campaign, George Papadopoulos pleaded guilty in 2017 to making false statements to the FBI regarding “the timing, extent and nature of his relationships and interactions with certain foreign nationals whom he understood to have close connections with senior Russian government officials,” according to court documents.

He also reportedly tried to set up meetings between Russian and Trump campaign officials on various occasions. 

Alex van der Zwaan

Alex van der Zwaan arrives at a plea agreement hearing at the D.C. federal courthouse in Washington, U.S., February 20, 2018. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas - RC129AC156E0

Attorney Alex van der Zwaan pleaded guilty to lying to investigators about his interactions with Gates.

 (Reuters/Yuri Gripas)

Mueller’s team charged Alex van der Zwaan, an attorney who allegedly lied to federal investigators in the Russia probe, in federal court on Feb. 16. He pleaded guilty days later. 

According to charging documents, van der Zwaan was employed by a law firm hired by the Ukraine Ministry of Justice in 2012. He admitted to lying about his interactions with Gates.

The charge against van der Zwaan does not involve election meddling or the Trump campaign’s operations. It stems from the special counsel’s investigation into a covert Washington lobbying campaign Manafort and Gates are accused of directing on behalf of pro-Russian Ukrainian interests.

The law firm where he used to work says it fired him last year and has been cooperating with authorities.

Richard Pinedo

Richard Pinedo, a California man who sold bank accounts to Russians meddling in the election, pleaded guilty to using stolen identities to set up the bank accounts earlier this month.

The U.S. government said Pinedo did not know that he was dealing with Russians when he sold the accounts. The plea was announced on the same day that Mueller’s office charged 13 Russians and the indictment was the most direct allegation to date of illegal Russian meddling during the campaign.

Pinedo ran the online service Auction Essistance, buying and selling bank account numbers so customers could avoid security measures of digital payment companies, Newsweek reported. The Auction Essistance website says it is “currently undergoing scheduled maintenance.”

13 Russian nationals

A grand jury indicted 13 Russian nationals and three Russian companies in February for allegedly interfering in the 2016 election. In the case, Mueller details a sophisticated plot to wage “information warfare” on the U.S.

The indictment is the first to be brought against Russian nationals in Mueller’s investigation. 

However, the Justice Department said the indictment does not allege that the interference changed the outcome of the election.

“There is no allegation in this indictment that any American was a knowing participant in this illegal activity,” said Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who oversees the special counsel probe.

Fox News’ Samuel Chamberlain and The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Madeline Farber is a Reporter for Fox News. You can follow her on Twitter @MaddieFarberUDK.



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British holidaymakers given major boost as EU outlines plans to reopen borders

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BRITONS have been handed a major summer holidays boost after EU bosses announced plans to welcome them to the Continent this summer.

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Here’s what the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act would do

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As he welcomed the guilty verdicts Tuesday against former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, President Joe Biden pressed Congress to advance the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, named for the Black man Chauvin killed while kneeling on his neck.

The bill, approved by the Democratic-led House in March, has yet to receive a vote in the Senate, where 10 Republicans would be needed for passage.

“George Floyd was murdered almost a year ago,” Biden said in remarks Tuesday night at the White House. “It shouldn’t take a whole year to get this done.”

A jury convicted Chauvin of second- and third-degree murder and manslaughter, a development that Biden described as a “step forward” toward addressing systemic racism and police misconduct but “not enough.” Biden that when speaking with Floyd’s family he “assured them we’re going to continue to fight for the passage of the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act so I can sign the law as quickly as possible.”

The bill aims to end certain police techniques, including chokeholds and carotid holds, two forms of potentially deadly force. Such practices would be banned at the federal level, and federal funding for local and state police agencies would be conditioned on those agencies outlawing them. The bill also seeks to improve police training and invest in community programs designed to improve policing and promote equitable new policies.

Other provisions in the bill would:

  • Prohibit racial, religious and discriminatory profiling by law enforcement at the local, state and federal levels and mandate training against such discriminatory profiling.

  • Require local and state police agencies to use existing federal funds to ensure the use of body cameras, require all federal uniformed officers to wear body cameras, and require all marked federal police vehicles to use dashboard cameras.

Several Republicans, including Sens. Tim Scott, of South Carolina and Rand Paul, of Kentucky, have offered alternate proposals to address police misconduct. Rep. Karen Bass, D-Calif., the sponsor of the George Floyd bill, said after the House moved the legislation in March that she is confident the House and Senate can work toward a compromise.



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'Cowards!' Johnny Mercer breaks silence on Boris sacking as he launches explosive rant

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FORMER veterans minister Johnny Mercer has sensationally hit out at the Government after being sacked from his position yesterday evening.

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