Connect with us

Politics

Monica Lewinsky announces why she supports #MeToo

Published

on

The White House intern-turned-tabloid celebrity Monica Lewinsky revealed in an essay published Sunday why she strongly supports the #MeToo movement and Time’s Up initiative to combat sexual assault and harassment. 

In the Vanity Fair piece, she noted the ‘90s affair with President Bill Clinton when she was a twentysomething White House intern was a “gross abuse of power” on his part, saying, “the idea of consent might well be rendered moot.” 

She wrote: “I now see how problematic it was that the two of us even got to a place where there was a question of consent. Instead, the road that led there was littered with inappropriate abuse of authority, station, and privilege.”

Lewinsky wrote about how the support for the women’s movement has encouraged her to evolve beyond a victim consciousness.

“The reason this is difficult is that I’ve lived for such a long time in the House of Gaslight, clinging to my experiences as they unfolded in my 20s and railing against the untruths that painted me as an unstable stalker and Servicer in Chief,” she wrote in the essay.

She also said she was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) several years ago. 

“My hope, given the two decades that have passed, is that we are now at a stage where we can untangle the complexities and context (maybe even with a little compassion), which might help lead to an eventual healing — and a systemic transformation,” her essay added. 

Clinton was caught having an affair with Lewinsky in January 1998, and the House Judiciary Committee approved articles of impeachment by December — charging him with perjury and obstruction of justice. Clinton eventually was acquitted by the Senate, and allowed to finish out his second term as president.

In a sign of the times, Democrat Kirsten Gillibrand, elected to the Senate with the Clintons’ backing but eyeing the White House in 2020, recently said Clinton should have resigned after the Lewinsky affair. 

Fox News Channel debuted a Sunday-night miniseries about the Lewinsky affair, which began on Jan. 21. “Scandalous” airs Sundays at 8 p.m. ET.

Source link

Politics

'Momentum forward positive' Raab hints at further travel relaxation after US-EU reopening

Published

on

DOMINIC Raab hinted a further relaxation to foreign travel will be announced next week following the decision to reopen the borders to double-jabbed US and EU tourists.

Source link

Continue Reading

Politics

Tory MP says scrapping English Votes for English Laws is about ‘strengthening the Union’

Published

on

A TORY MP in Wales has said English Votes for English Laws was used to “reinforce a message with voters that the Union is divided”.

Source link

Continue Reading

Politics

Civilian deaths, Taliban attacks rising as full U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan looms, report says

Published

on

WASHINGTON — Civilian casualties and Taliban attacks in Afghanistan are mounting as the U.S. withdrawal nears completion and the Afghan military continues its collapse, according to a new quarterly report from a U.S. government watchdog that describes a country ravaged by Covid-19 and violence.

The report by the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, or SIGAR, found a “dramatic increase in enemy-initiated attacks” from January through March of this year compared to the same time in previous years. There were 10,431 attacks this year, up from 7,620 last year and 6,358 in 2019.

Attacks have been increasing since the U.S.-Taliban agreement on Feb. 29, 2020, with more attacks in each three-month period since the agreement than in the same quarters in the previous year.

The number of attacks against the Afghan military and civilians has increased significantly this year, the report says, with many attacks coming during the Taliban offensive now sweeping across the country.

The Taliban launched an offensive in May after U.S. and coalition military forces began withdrawing. The offensive accelerated in June and July.

However, the report notes that Afghan forces have stopped reporting attacks as their situation deteriorates, and it says the U.S. stopped collecting attack data effective May 31 with the end of the U.S. training and advisory mission.

Civilian deaths were rising until the end of that reporting period. Resolute Support, the NATO mission in Afghanistan, reported 2,035 civilian casualties in April and May — 705 deaths and 1,330 injuries. That is nearly as many civilian casualties as in the first three months of this year combined, 2,149, and higher than in April and May of last year. According to Resolute Support, the top two causes of civilian casualties were improvised explosive devices and direct fire, and 93 percent of civilian casualties in April and May were from insurgents, largely the Taliban.

The Taliban have overrun Afghan military checkpoints and bases, district centers and a series of key border crossings, according to the SIGAR report. In some cases, the Afghan military forces, known as ANDSF, have fled.

“In some districts ANDSF forces put up some level of resistance and conducted a tactical (fighting) retreat, while in others they surrendered or fled in disorder,” the report says, citing news reports that 1,600 ANDSF fled into Tajikistan this month to avoid Taliban advances in Badakhshan province.

At a briefing last week, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Army Gen. Mark Milley, said the Taliban control about half of the 419 district centers in Afghanistan and are pressuring 17 of the country’s 34 provincial capitals.

“Particularly concerning was the speed and ease with which the Taliban seemingly wrested control of districts in Afghanistan’s northern provinces, once a bastion of anti-Taliban sentiment,” the SIGAR report says. At a news conference June 29, the former commander of the NATO Resolute Support Mission, Army Gen. Scott Miller, told reporters: “We should be concerned. The loss of terrain and the rapidity of that loss of terrain has to be concerning.”

The SIGAR also found that most Afghan military forces “refuse to execute missions.” Instead, the more highly trained and proficient Afghan special operators are used for basic tasks like route clearance, checkpoint security and quick reaction forces.

The Afghan air force is overtaxed now that U.S. air support has largely ended, according to the report. All Afghan air force aircraft are flying at least 25 percent over their recommended scheduled maintenance, the report found, and the readiness of most of the aircraft has plummeted since most U.S. support has withdrawn. The UH-60 Blackhawk fleet was at 77 percent readiness in May and dropped to 39 percent in June.

The U.S. military has carried out a handful of airstrikes against the Taliban this month, according to defense officials, but the aircraft fly in from neighboring countries now that nearly all U.S. military forces and equipment have left Afghanistan. Once the U.S. military mission officially ends on Aug. 31, the U.S. will still carry out strikes against Al Qaeda and Islamic State terrorists, but it will no longer carry out strikes against the Taliban.

Meanwhile, the report says, the Afghan public is coping with a 2,400 percent increase in Covid cases, the majority from the delta variant. According to the U.N., half of the population requires humanitarian assistance.



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending