Connect with us

World

Rubio on the defensive on gun control

Published

on

Republican Sen. Marco Rubio was put on the defensive Wednesday by angry students, teachers, and parents who are demanding stronger gun-control measures after the shooting rampage that claimed 17 lives at a Florida high school.

One of those confronting the Florida senator at a CNN’s “Stand Up” town hall Wednesday night was Fred Guttenberg, whose 14-year-old daughter Jaime was killed on Feb. 14 with 16 others. Rubio was the lone Republican at the nationally broadcast gathering after Florida’s GOP Gov. Rick Scott and President Donald Trump declined invitations to appear at the event in Sunrise, Florida.

Guttenberg told Rubio that his comments about the shooting “and those of your president this week have been pathetically weak.”

People stood up and cheered Guttenberg as he challenged Rubio to tell him the truth, to acknowledge that “guns were the factor in the hunting of our kids.”

Guttenberg added, “And tell me you will work with us to do something about guns.”

Rubio responded that the problems laid bare by the shooting rampage “cannot be solved by gun laws alone,” drawing jeering whistles from the crowd. Rubio responded that he would support laws barring those 18 and under from buying such weapons, support changing the background checks system and getting rid of bump stocks.

He said that if he believed an assault weapons ban “would have prevented this from happening, I would have supported it.” That drew jeers. Visibly angry, Guttenberg responded: “That is a weapon of war.”

Sen. Bill Nelson and Congressman Ted Deutch, both Democrats from Florida, also were present on a dais.

Nelson said he grew up on a ranch and hunted all his life.

“I still hunt with my son but an AK-47 and an AR-15 is not for hunting, it’s for killing,” said Nelson to applause.

Ryan Schachter, whose brother Alex, was fatally gunned down at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, was among those questioning the lawmakers.

“I’m supposed to go back to school in the upcoming week,” said Schachter. “Me and my friends worry we are going to be murdered in our classrooms.”

Student Cameron Kasky did not mince words telling Rubio, “It’s hard to look at you and not look down the barrel of an AR-15 and not look at Nikolas Cruz” before asking squarely, “Can you tell me right now that you will not accept a single donation from the NRA?” The room erupted in cheers as Rubio replied that people buy into his agenda and that he supports laws to keep guns out of the hands of deranged people.

Rubio said he does not support arming teachers and Nelson agreed saying Trump’s suggestion on arming them was “a terrible idea.”

Shortly before the town hall event opened, the sheriff of the Florida county torn apart by the rampage spoke to the cheering audience, drawing them to their feet as he exhorted them to press on for stricter gun controls.

Sheriff Scott Israel of Broward County declared the U.S. has had enough of deadly shootings and that he was personally saddened to have to go through the crime scene of a “horrific killer” 30 minutes after the attack last week. He said the young people should hold lawmakers accountable for making their schools and other community places safer or they won’t be re-elected.

“Never again!” he declared of the Parkland attack, exhorting the young people to press on: “America’s watching you … there will be change.”

Source link

World

The G-7 heads to Cornwall, home of the Eden Project

Published

on

This June, leaders from countries including the U.S., U.K., Germany and Japan will congregate in Cornwall, a picturesque county in the southwest of England, to take part in the G-7 summit.

The small coastal resort of Carbis Bay will be the epicenter of the talks, with larger towns including St Ives and Falmouth set to play a supporting role.

While Cornwall is rightly famed for its natural beauty, fishing communities and pristine beaches, it’s also home to one of the most interesting developments in Britain: the Eden Project.

A popular tourist attraction located near the town of St Austell — around an hour’s drive from Carbis Bay — the Eden Project was officially opened in 2001.

The site is instantly recognizable thanks to its “Biomes,” which are bubble-like structures housing vast indoor gardens packed with plants from across the world.

Below, CNBC looks at some of the other design features and technologies which have helped the Eden Project stand out from the crowd and attract millions of visitors over the years.

Monitoring tech

In a bid to cut its energy consumption, the Eden Project — which is temporarily closed to visitors because of the coronavirus pandemic — makes use of a building management system, or BMS.

Its official site describes this as resembling “a giant TV remote” which enables “very tight control of our heating and electrical systems.”

The BMS monitors usage within the Biomes, offices and other buildings at the complex and ensures the site never uses more than it needs.

Energy efficiency and insulation

In addition to the BMS, a range of on-the-ground technologies are being deployed to boost the energy efficiency of the Eden Project.

These include the installation of LED lighting and use of high-efficiency boilers.

Buildings at the site have also been designed to make the most of natural light and ventilation, while an emphasis has also been placed on the use of “super insulation.”

Hexagonal cushions on the Biomes’ steel structure are used to capture air between two layers of a material called ethylene tetrafluoroethylene, creating a “thermal blanket.”

Elsewhere, insulation comes in the form of recycled newspapers, while a green roof located on a building used by staff attracts wildlife and helps keep things cool during the summer and warm in winter months.

Renewables

While the site has placed a great deal of focus on energy efficiency, it’s also embracing renewable energy technologies.

A 30 kilowatt (kW) solar power system has been installed on the rooftop of the Eden Project’s Core building — which is used for education purposes — while a 5 kW wind turbine is located near the site’s car park.

These technologies are supplemented by a deal with Good Energy, which supplies the Eden Project with 100% renewable energy.

5G connectivity

Just last week, it was announced a consortium headed up by the Eden Project was one of nine picked to take part in the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport’s “5G Testbeds and Trials Programme.”

Called Eden Universe, the Eden Project consortium will benefit from a grant of £1.6 million ($2.18 million), with a 5G network and 360-degree video technology set to be installed on-site.

Among other things, the tech will allow teams at the Eden Project to create and test a range of augmented and virtual reality programs and “experiences” for visitors.

Sustainable transport

In addition to the tech which has been integrated into the fabric of the Eden Project’s buildings, efforts are also being made to encourage the use of sustainable transport.

To this end, discounts are available for visitors who cycle, walk or use combined coach, bus and train tickets.

Staff at the Eden Project can also make use of an 18-strong fleet of zero-emission electric vehicles from French carmaker Renault.

Source link

Continue Reading

World

IEA cuts 2021 demand outlook on renewed Covid lockdown measures

Published

on

A worker holds a fuel pump nozzle at a gas station in Shah Alam, Malaysia, on Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2021.

Samsul Said | Bloomberg | Getty Images

LONDON — The International Energy Agency on Tuesday cut its 2021 global oil demand forecast, citing soaring Covid-19 cases and renewed lockdown measures that will further limit mobility.

The IEA said it now expects world oil demand to recover by 5.5 million barrels per day to 96.6 million this year. That reflects a downward revision of 0.3 million barrels from last month’s assessment and follows an unprecedented collapse of 8.8 million barrels per day last year as the coronavirus pandemic battered global oil markets.

The IEA’s latest oil market report comes as countries continue to implement strict public health measures in an attempt to curb virus spread, with lockdowns imposed in Europe and parts of China.

The Paris-based energy agency said oil demand growth was projected to fall slightly during the first three months of the year in the wake of tougher government plans that call for additional travel restrictions.

This is expected to curb worldwide mobility once again, prompting the IEA to trim its first-quarter forecast for oil demand growth to 94.1 million barrels per day. That would see oil demand return to near year-ago levels and reflects a downward revision of 0.6 million barrels from December’s oil market report.

“The global vaccine roll-out is putting fundamentals on a stronger trajectory for the year, with both supply and demand shifting back into growth mode following 2020’s unprecedented collapse,” the IEA said in its closely-watched report.

“But it will take more time for oil demand to recover fully as renewed lockdowns in a number of countries weigh on fuel sales,” it added.

Oil prices

Oil prices have rallied in recent weeks, supported by optimism over Covid vaccine rollouts and a surprise oil production cut from OPEC kingpin Saudi Arabia.

However, the relatively slow pace of inoculations has raised doubts over how soon economies can recover.

International benchmark Brent crude futures traded at $55.26 a barrel on Tuesday morning, up more than 0.9%, while U.S. West Texas Intermediate futures stood at $52.51, around 0.3% higher.

Both benchmarks fell more than 2.2% in the previous session, notching their worst daily performance since Dec. 21.

Oil pumping jacks, also known as “nodding donkeys,” in a Rosneft Oil Co. oilfield near Sokolovka village, in the Udmurt Republic, Russia, on Friday, Nov. 20, 2020.

Andrey Rudakov | Bloomberg | Getty Images

OPEC and its non-OPEC allies, an alliance sometimes referred to as OPEC+, cut oil production by a record amount in 2020 in an effort to support crude prices, as strict public health measures worldwide coincided with a fuel demand shock.

OPEC+ initially agreed to cut output by 9.7 million barrels per day, before easing cuts to 7.7 million and eventually scaling back further to 7.2 million from January. OPEC’s de facto leader Saudi Arabia has since said it plans to cut output by an extra 1 million barrels per day in February and March to stop inventories from building up.

Last week, OPEC kept its 2021 forecast for worldwide oil demand unchanged. The 13-member group anticipated demand growth to increase by 5.9 million barrels per day year on year to average 95.9 million.

Source link

Continue Reading

World

How to stay motivated during a cold, winter Covid lockdown

Published

on

Continue Reading

Trending