Connect with us

Politics

Former Florida State Republican jumped to his death from overpass, medical examiner says

Published

on

A former Florida state Republican who was hailed as a “good and decent man” by his onetime Democratic opponent plunged to his death Monday from a highway overpass.

The Hillsborough County medical examiner ruled the death of Robert Wallace, 65, a suicide; his body was found lying on rocks near a Dale Mabry Highway overpass in the Tampa area, according to the Tampa Bay Times.

“He was a good and decent man,” Brian P. Rush, the 1994 incumbent who lost to Wallace despite outspending him, told the newspaper. “He had a different philosophy, but I could sense that he was honorable. He really wanted to be in public service.”

A witness told the medical examiner about seeing Wallace fall 40 to 50 feet before his body was found by responders after 7 p.m. Monday.

St. Timothy Catholic Church in Lutz, where a Mass will be held in the former lawmaker’s honor on Monday, confirmed the death to Fox News.

Wallace spent eight years in Tallahassee fighting new taxes and government overreach, voting against bills that called for mandatory swimming pool fences and bicycle helmets, the Tampa Bay Times reported.

He got on the ballot after going around and collecting enough signatures.

“Truman said that money doesn’t win elections, people do. I wanted to prove that,” Wallace said after he was first voted into office. “The key was reaching people, going out walking the district door to door and waving signs on Dale Mabry and in downtown Tarpon Springs.”

After hitting his term limit in 2002, Wallace ran an environmental engineering company in the Tampa area, under the “belief that man can cause problems and man can solve those problems.”

The medical examiner’s office said Wallace had been grappling with depression at the time of his death and was taking medications for it.

“This just proves how much we don’t know about how to fight mental illness,” former state Sen. John Grant, who worked with Wallace, told the newspaper.

The newspaper said Wallace is survived by his wife, a daughter and three sons.

“He was a true family man who loved and cared deeply for his community,” his daughter, Amber Loper, said in a family statement read Wednesday, as quoted by the newspaper.

“He worked hard to give all he could back to others, which led him to start his environmental business, run for state office and volunteer for many organizations,” she added. “He will be deeply missed.”

Source link

Politics

Really, Nicola? SNP blunder as £700k spent on ‘political propaganda’ thank-you letters

Published

on

NICOLA Sturgeon is facing a backlash after the Scottish Government splashed out more than £700,000 on COVID-19 thank-you letters.

Source link

Continue Reading

Politics

Glad we left? EU chief admits it will be difficult to vaccinate 70% of adults by summer

Published

on

THE European Union has admitted that reaching its goal of vaccinating 70 percent of the bloc’s adult population against Covid by summer will be “difficult”.

Source link

Continue Reading

Politics

Biden to reinstate Trump Covid travel restrictions, impose new ban on South Africa

Published

on

President Joe Biden plans to sign restrictions Monday on travel to the United States to mitigate Covid-19 transmission, two White House officials confirmed Sunday.

The ban would prevent most non-U.S. citizens from entry if they have recently been in South Africa where a new strain of Covid-19 has been identified. The virus has claimed more than 418,000 American lives and infected upwards of 25 million across the U.S., according to an NBC News tracker.

The president is also expected to reinstate broader restrictions that were in effect much of the past year but rescinded by then-President Donald Trump days before his term ended. Those limits would affect non-U.S. citizens traveling from the United Kingdom, Ireland and much of Europe under what is known as the Schengen countries who share a common visa process. Travelers from Brazil would also be affected.

Reuters was first to report on the restrictions.

Before Biden took office, incoming White House press secretary Jen Psaki in a tweet criticized Trump’s decision to rescind the bans he had implemented.

“With the pandemic worsening, and more contagious variants emerging around the world, this is not the time to be lifting restrictions on international travel,” she said.

The restrictions, which Trump rolled back on Jan. 18, were set to take effect on Tuesday.

The CDC also said Sunday that, effective Jan. 26, it would no longer consider exceptions to its requirement that international travelers present a negative coronavirus test. Airlines had asked the agency to relax the rule for some countries with limited testing capacity.

“As variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus continue to emerge in countries around the world, there is growing evidence of increased transmissibility of some of these variants, as well as unknown health and vaccine implications,” a CDC spokesman said in a statement. “Testing before and after travel is a critical layer to slow the introduction and spread of COVID-19 and emerging variants.”



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending