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Evangelist Rev. Billy Graham dies at age 99

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Graham stood fast. He would not reject people who were sincere and shared at least some of his beliefs, Martin said. He wanted the widest hearing possible for his salvation message.
“The ecumenical movement has broadened my viewpoint and I recognize now that God has his people in all churches,” he said in the early 1950s.

In 1957, he said, “I intend to go anywhere, sponsored by anybody, to preach the Gospel of Christ.”

His approach helped evangelicals gain the influence they have today. Graham’s path to becoming an evangelist began taking shape at age 16, when the Presbyterian-reared farmboy committed himself to Christ at a local tent revival.

“I did not feel any special emotion,” he wrote in his 1997 autobiography, “Just As I Am.” “I simply felt at peace,” and thereafter, “the world looked different.”

After high school, he enrolled at the fundamentalist Bob Jones College, but found the school stifling, and transferred to Florida Bible Institute in Tampa. There, he practiced sermonizing in a swamp, preaching to birds and alligators before tryouts with small churches. He still wasn’t convinced he should be a preacher until a soul-searching, late-night ramble on a golf course.

“I finally gave in while pacing at midnight on the 18th hole,” he said. `”All right, Lord,’ I said, `If you want me, you’ve got me.”‘
Graham, who became a Southern Baptist, went on to study at Wheaton College, a prominent Christian liberal arts school in Illinois, where he met fellow student Ruth Bell, who had been raised in China where her father had been a Presbyterian medical missionary.

The two married in 1943, and he planned to become an Army chaplain. But he fell seriously ill, and by the time he recovered and could start the chaplain training program, World War II was nearly over.

Instead, he took a job organizing meetings in the U.S. and Europe with Youth for Christ, a group he helped found. He stood out then for his loud ties and suits, and a rapid delivery and swinging arms that won him the nickname “the Preaching Windmill.”

A 1949 Los Angeles revival turned Graham into evangelism’s rising star. Held in a tent dubbed the “Canvas Cathedral,” Graham had been drawing adequate, but not spectacular crowds until one night when reporters and photographers descended. When Graham asked them why, a reporter said that legendary publisher William Randolph Hearst had ordered his papers to hype Graham. Graham said he never found out why.

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Qualcomm chip market share plunges in China after U.S. sanctions on Huawei

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Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 888 chip will be used in premium Android devices that could cost over $1000.

Qualcomm

Qualcomm’s market share of China’s smartphone chip market plunged in 2020 due to U.S. sanctions on Huawei, according to a new report.

As a result, the country’s domestic mobile players turned to alternatives such as Taiwan’s MediaTek, according to CINNO Research.

Last year, 307 million smartphone so-called system on chips (SOC) were shipped in China, down 20.8% year-on-year, the report said.

SOC is a type of semiconductor that contains many components required for a device to work on a single chip, such as a processor. They are a critical component for smartphones.

Qualcomm’s shipments in China shrank 48.1% year-on-year, CINNO Research said without releasing details on the number of Qualcomm chips shipped. The U.S. giant’s market share in China fell to 25.4% in 2020 versus 37.9% in 2019.

MediaTek No. 1

Taiwan’s MediaTek benefited from all that pent-up demand. The chip designer took advantage of Huawei and Qualcomm’s woes, and also got major Chinese smartphone makers to use its chips.

“As far as we know, (for) OPPO, Vivo and Xiaomi and Huawei, the MediaTek share has increased a lot,” CINNO Research told CNBC in a statement from its analysts.

Huawei is China’s largest smartphone maker by market share, followed by Vivo, Oppo and Xiaomi.

Many of these players make phones priced at the mid-range but with high specs. This is where MediaTek has performed well in gaining share.

The U.S. sanctions on Huawei have also forced other Chinese players to look for alternatives should they find themselves cut off from the likes of Qualcomm.

“This (is) not only because (of) the excellent performance of MediaTek’s mid-end platform, but also, it is undeniable that the U.S. has imposed a series of sanctions on Huawei & Hisilicon, forcing major manufacturers to seek more diversified, stable and reliable sources of supply,” CINNO Research said in a press release.

Xiaomi was recently added to a U.S. blacklist of alleged Chinese military companies, though its unclear if this will affect their ability to procure certain components.

5G market up for grabs

China is the world’s largest market for 5G smartphones. 5G refers to next-generation mobile internet, and chipmakers are battling it out for a slice of the pie.

“After the first year of 5G, let’s take a view of the changes in China’s smartphone SOC market. It shows that the market pattern has changed from a single dominant Qualcomm company in the 4G era, to a three-party pattern of Hisilicon, Qualcomm and MediaTek in 2020,” CINNO Research said.

Last year, Qualcomm launched a new series of 5G smartphones chips known as the 6 series and 4 series, which could eat into MediaTek’s market share in China.

“Qualcomm launching 6 and 4 series 5G chipset will help to take share away from MediaTek in the fast growing 5G smartphone segment in China,” said Neil Shah, a partner at Counterpoint Research.

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LinkedIn says these are the fastest growing job sectors in the UK

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Biden’s first world leader call to be to Canada’s Trudeau: White House

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White House press secretary Jen Psaki on Wednesday told reporters that President Joe Biden’s first world leader call would be to Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

“His first call, foreign leader call will be on Friday with Prime Minister Trudeau,” she said during her first press briefing at the White House after Biden’s inauguration.

“I expect they will certainly discuss the important relationship with Canada, as well as his decision on the Keystone Pipeline that we announced today,” said Psaki.

Biden officially revoked the presidential permit that the Trump administration granted to the contentious cross-border oil pipeline project.

The press secretary added that Biden is likely to prioritize speaking with U.S. allies.

“I would expect his early calls will be with partners and allies,” she said. “He feels it’s important to rebuild those relationships and to address the challenges and threats we’re facing in the world.”

Psaki was also asked if Biden will be speaking to Russia’s president, Vladimir Putin, and whether they would discuss possible retaliation to the SolarWinds hack.

Russians were likely behind the hack that breached U.S. government networks, according to a joint statement by several U.S. agencies including the FBI and the National Security Agency.

“I don’t have any plans … to read out for you in terms of a call with President Putin,” she said.

Regarding the SolarWinds hack, she said “we reserve the right to respond at a time and in a manner of our choosing to any cyberattack.”

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