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North Carolina teacher fired after video shows him body slamming student, reports say

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A substitute teacher in North Carolina was fired this week after video footage emerged of him apparently slamming a 12-year-old student to the ground.

The incident, which reportedly took place Wednesday at Western Guilford Middle School in Greensboro, was sparked after the teacher apparently took away student Jose Escudero’s Valentine’s Day chocolates.

Escudero told Fox 8 that the teacher took away the candy, and when he tried to retrieve the sweets and put them in his backpack after class, the teacher allegedly tried to stop him.

The teacher, according to Escudero, attempted to grab the box from him, before allegedly grabbing the 12-year-old by the shirt and pinning him against the wall before throwing him over his shoulder and onto the ground.

The substitute teacher was identified as Paul Stennett, 49, according to WXII.

CALIFORNIA TEACHER WHO SLAMMED MILITARY REFUSES TO QUIT, BUT IS CONDEMNED BY CITY COUNCIL

The video circulated Friday when Escudero’s mother posted it to Facebook “asking for justice.” She wrote that Jose was suspended for seven days following the incident.

“This kind of behavior toward a student is disturbing and unacceptable,” Guilford County Schools’ Chief of Staff Nora Carr told Fox 8 in a statement.

“We reported the behavior to law enforcement and will no longer employ this person as a substitute teacher or in any other GCS position,” Carr continued.

Officials told WXII that Stennett, who reportedly owns a daycare center in Henderson, began working for Guilford schools in December.

NORTH CAROLINA TEACHERS MUST REPAY BONUS HANDED OUT IN ERROR

Escudero and his mother plan to take legal action against both the school and Stennett, according to Fox 8.

The Greensboro Police Department told the Daily Mail that the video posted to Facebook “does not capture the entire incident,” and officials “are still interviewing people so it would be premature to place any charges at this time.”

Nicole Darrah covers breaking and trending news for FoxNews.com.

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Coronavirus: Two million global deaths ‘not impossible’ even with vaccine, warns WHO | World News

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The number of global coronavirus deaths could reach two million before a vaccine is found and widely used, the World Health Organisation has warned.

It comes as the death toll in the nine months since the coronavirus emerged in Wuhan, China, nears one million.

Dr Mike Ryan, director of the WHO’s emergencies programme, said the figure could be higher without concerted action to curb the pandemic.

“It’s certainly unimaginable,” he told a briefing. “But it’s not impossible, because if we look at losing a million people in nine months and then we just look at the realities of getting a vaccine out there in the next nine months, it’s a big task for everyone involved.

“There’s the issue of funding these vaccines. There’s the issue of distributing these vaccines and then the issues of acceptance.

“And beyond that, with the work we still have to do in controlling this disease. And remember, we have things we can do now to drive transmission down and drive down the number of deaths.”

Dr Ryan said there was a “worrying” spike of COVID-19 infections across Europe, which have triggered local lockdowns.

These are in part due to improved and rigorous testing, he added.

“But what is worrying to us is an increase in hospitalisations and an increase in bed occupancy for hospitalisations and also in ICU. We’re at the end of September, not even towards the end of September, and we haven’t even started our flu season yet,” he said.

“So what we are worried about is the possibility that these trends are going in the wrong direction. Now, on the other hand, we are in a much different situation now than we were in a few months ago. We have tools in place to be able to reduce transmission and to save lives.”



WHO chief cautions against vaccine nationalism







‘Vaccine nationalism will prolong pandemic’

Infections have risen to almost 32.5 million, according to Johns Hopkins University, which has been tracking the coronavirus outbreak.

Many countries are experiencing a second surge as winter approaches.

It is unknown what impact the cold months will have on the disease, and how it will interact with other seasonal respiratory viruses.

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Charlie Hebdo: Terror investigation after attacks near magazine’s former offices in Paris | World News

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French terrorism authorities are investigating an attack that wounded two journalists near the former offices of satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris.

Emergency services were called to the scene in Rue Nicolas Appert, in the 11th arrondissement, near the Richard Lenoir Metro station, at around 11.40am local time.

French firefighters load one of the several people injured into a waiting ambulance near the former offices of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo following an alleged attack by a man wielding a knife in the capital Paris on September 25, 2020. - The threats coincide with the trial of 14 suspected accomplices of the perpetrators of the massacres at Charlie Hebdo and a Jewish supermarket that left a total of 17 dead. (Photo by Alain JOCARD / AFP) (Photo by ALAIN JOCARD/AFP via Getty Image
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French firefighters load one of the several people injured into a waiting ambulance

Prime Minister Jean Castex, who went to the scene, said two people who work for documentary film company Premieres Lignes were seemingly attacked at random while they were having a cigarette break.

One witness told Europe 1 radio: “I was in my office. I heard screams in the road. I looked out of the window and saw a woman who was lying on the floor and had taken a whack in the face from what was possibly a machete.”

Kader Alfa, another witness, told Associated Press: “I saw a guy that was in his 30s or 40s with an axe in his hand who was walking behind a victim covered in blood…I can’t tell you how many victims there was, I just saw one.”

Paul Moreira, who is the founder of Premieres Lignes, confirmed two of his colleagues were injured.

He said: “It’s somebody who was in the road with a meat cleaver who attacked them in front of our offices. It was chilling.”

Mr Castex said the main attacker had been arrested, a second person was in custody and that the victims’ injuries were not believed to be life-threatening.

Emergency services flocked to the scene in the 11th arrondissement
Image:
Emergency services flocked to the scene in the 11th arrondissement

“This attack happened in a symbolic place at the same time as the trial of the terrible attacks on Charlie Hebdo,” he added.

He promised the government’s “unfailing attachment to freedom of the press, and its determination to fight terrorism”.

A blade found at the scene was described by police sources as a machete or a meat cleaver.

Armed officers were seen patrolling the road after the attack on Friday
Image:
Armed officers were seen patrolling the road after the attack on Friday

Europe 1 Radio quoted police officials as saying the main suspect was 18 and was known to security services.

The incident comes three weeks after 14 people, who have suspected links to homegrown Islamist militants, went on trial following the Charlie Hebdo attack in the same street.

A total of 12 people died and 11 people were injured after two brothers, Saïd and Chérif Kouachi, stormed the offices of the satirical weekly newspaper with guns and began shooting in January 2015.

The brothers escaped and were later shot dead by police after a stand-off.

The motive for the latest stabbing is unclear, and it is not known whether it is linked to Charlie Hebdo, which has now moved out of the area.

French Prime Minister Jean Castex (centre) speaks to journalists with the French Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin (right) and Paris mayor Anne Hidalgo (left)
Image:
French Prime Minister Jean Castex (centre) speaks to journalists with the French Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin (right) and Paris mayor Anne Hidalgo (left)

On the opening day of the trial, the magazine re-ran a series of cartoons depicting the Prophet Mohammed, which Muslims consider blasphemous.

The trial, which will see the attackers’ widows testify, was still set to go ahead this afternoon.

The writers of Charlie Hebdo showed their solidarity with the victims of the attack on Friday.

They posted on Twitter: “Charlie’s entire team provides support and solidarity to his former neighbours and colleagues @PLTVfilms and to those affected by this heinous attack.”

Since the Charlie Hebdo mass shooting, France has faced several other terrorist attacks.

In November 2015, there were a series of bombings in Paris and a mass shooting at the Bataclan music venue during an Eagles of Death Metal concert. A total of 130 people died and more than 400 were said to be injured.

Eight months later, in July 2016, an Islamist militant drove a truck through a crowd celebrating Bastille Day in Nice, which killed 86 people and injured more than 450.



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Coronavirus: World leaders must overcome differences to fight COVID-19, PM to warn | World News

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Boris Johnson will warn the coronavirus pandemic has divided the international community, as he pledges hundreds of millions of pounds to the World Health Organisation to fight future viruses.

In a speech at the UN General Assembly later, the prime minister will warn that countries must work together and overcome the divisions created by the global health crisis or risk it spiralling out of control.

Mr Johnson will also make a large financial commitment to the WHO, making the UK the largest country-donor to the organisation just months after Donald Trump froze US funding.



Bereaved share stories of COVID deaths as disease reaches one million dead







Bereaved share COVID stories as disease reaches one million dead

He will say: “After nine months of fighting COVID, the very notion of the international community looks tattered.

“We know that we cannot continue in this way. Unless we unite and turn our fire against our common foe, we know that everyone will lose.

“Now is the time therefore – here at what I devoutly hope will be the first and last ever Zoom UNGA – for humanity to reach across borders and repair these ugly rifts.”

The prime minister will also unveil an ambitious plan, timed to coincide with the UK presidency of the G7 next year, designed to prevent future global health crisis.

In his pre-recorded speech, Mr Johnson will add: “Here in the UK, the birthplace of Edward Jenner who pioneered the world’s first vaccine, we are determined to do everything in our power to work with our friends across the UN to heal those divisions and to heal the world.”



Boris Johnson and Keir Starmer







Boris Johnson and Sir Keir Starmer argue about coronavirus testing

The five point plan, developed with the Wellcome Trust and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, aims to identify dangerous pathogens which could make the leap between animals and humans before they lead to COVID-like pandemics.

He will also commit to an extra £71m for 27 million vaccine doses for the UK to combat COVID-19 and spend £500m to help poorer nations tackle the virus.

Announcing the UK will increase funding to the WHO by 30 per cent Mr Johnson will call for countries to work together, not pull apart.

The £340m investment will be spent over the next four years and comes after President Trump criticised the WHO for failing to tackle the virus in the early stages. The UK funding will aim to ensure the organisation can be flexible and respond quickly to any future pandemic.



Prime Minister Boris Johnson giving his address on coronavirus







22 September: Boris Johnson’s address to the nation

Mr Johnson will also set out further initiatives the UK plans to champion when it takes charge of the G7 next year, including a global pandemic early warning system, better manufacturing capability for treatments, global protocols for future health emergencies and a plan to reduce trade barriers to help nations respond more quickly in future.

In the early stages of the pandemic some nations increased tariffs on key goods such as soap, making it difficult for poorer nations to respond well.

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