Connect with us

Politics

Michael Moore participated in anti-Trump rally allegedly organized by Russians

Published

on

Michael Moore, the polemical filmmaker who has long accused President Trump of colluding with Russians, posted videos and pictures of himself participating in a protest in Manhattan that was allegedly organized by Russians in November 2016.

Prosecutors said Friday that the Russians indicted for meddling in the presidential campaign were also behind anti-Trump rallies that occured after the election.

The government alleged in an indictment signed by Special Counsel Robert Mueller that the defendants organized a Nov. 12 “Trump is NOT my President” rally in New York. Their “strategic goal” was to “sow discord in the U.S. political system,” the indictment said.

On Nov. 12, Moore tweeted: “At today’s Trump Tower protest. He wouldn’t come down.”

He attached a picture of himself posing with a large number of protesters.

Moore also posted a lengthy video on Facebook Nov. 12, in which he joined the protest and debated voters at Trump Tower.

Approximately 25,000 protesters turned out in New York on Nov. 12, chanting slogans rejecting the then-president-elect, NBC News reported at the time, citing New York Police Department officials.

Amid heavy police presence, protesters marched from Union Square to Trump Tower, the Guardian reported.

Moore has repeatedly claimed that President Trump inappropriately colluded with Russians.

Last year, Moore wrote on Facebook: “It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out what was going on: TRUMP COLLUDING WITH THE RUSSIANS TO THROW THE ELECTION TO HIM.”

Gregg Re is an editor for Fox News. Follow him on Twitter @gregg_re.



Source link

Politics

Keir Starmer's Labour Party plummets as Boris Johnson doubles lead in new poll

Published

on

THE TORIES have doubled their lead over Labour in the latest YouGov poll as Boris Johnson’s party continues to enjoy favourable ratings thanks to the huge success of the Covid vaccine rollout.

Source link

Continue Reading

Politics

Attorney General Garland rescinds Trump-era memo curtailing consent decrees

Published

on

WASHINGTON — Attorney General Merrick Garland on Friday rescinded a Trump-era memo that curtailed the use of consent decrees that federal prosecutors have used in sweeping investigations of police departments.

Garland issued a new memorandum to all U.S. attorneys and other Justice Department leaders spelling out the new policies on civil agreements and consent decrees with state and local governments.

The memo comes as the Justice Department shifts its priorities to focus more on civil rights issues, criminal justice overhauls and policing policies in the wake of nationwide protests over the death of Black Americans at the hands of law enforcement.

In easing restrictions placed on the use of consent decrees, the Justice Department is making it easier for its prosecutors to use the tool to force changes at police departments and other government agencies with widespread abuse and misconduct.

The memo in particular rescinds a previous memo issued by then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions shortly before he resigned in November 2018.

Democrats have long argued the ability of the Justice Department’s civil rights division to conduct sweeping probes of police departments had been curtailed under President Donald Trump. The so-called pattern or practice investigations examine whether systemic deficiencies contribute to misconduct or enable it to persist.

“This memorandum makes clear that the Department will use all appropriate legal authorities to safeguard civil rights and protect the environment, consistent with longstanding Departmental practice and informed by the expertise of the Department’s career workforce,” Garland said.

The Justice Department didn’t totally ban pattern or practice investigations under Trump, but former Attorney General William Barr suggested they may have been previously overused.

As attorney general in the Obama administration, Eric Holder frequently criticized violent police confrontations and opened a series of civil rights investigations into local law enforcement practices. The civil rights investigations often ended with court-approved consent decrees that mandated reforms.

The consent decrees included those with the police in Ferguson, Missouri, after the killing of Michael Brown and in Baltimore following the police custody death of 25-year-old Freddie Gray.

Source link

Continue Reading

Politics

SNP outlines when Scotland would hold independence referendum after elections

Published

on

SNP John Swinney has outlined when his party would hold a Scottish independence referendum if they won a majority in the next election.

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending