Connect with us

Politics

Republicans to use Pelosi against vulnerable Dems in midterm elections

Published

on

Republicans are set to use the unpopularity of House Minority Speaker Nancy Pelosi to launch attacks on vulnerable Democrats in the upcoming midterm elections.

A political ad from the Senate Leadership Fund, a PAC linked to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, slammed Sen. Joe Manchin, D-WVa., by showing images of him with Pelosi, The Wall Street Journal reported.

Another ad from the House Republican campaign released on Wednesday says “thanks” to Pelosi for her eight-hour speech on the House floor advocating protections for the so-called Dreamers – immigrants who were illegally brought to the country by their parents.

The GOP has long tried to paint Pelosi as the flag-bearer of the party, but the two new ads mark an escalating effort before the upcoming November elections, where a number of seats are up for grabs.

The strategy to tie the minority speaker to other Democrats was tried last year, when Republicans depicted Jon Ossoff, a Democrat who eventually lost the special election in Georgia’s highly-contested 6th House district, as someone who would get to Congress only to follow Pelosi’s command. GOP strategists claim the accusation ultimately won the race for the Republicans.

But Democrats remain skeptical whether such approach will be an election winner for the Republicans.

GOP REP UNVEILS ‘CRUMBS ACT’ TO MAKE BONUSES TAX-FREE, IN SWIPE AT PELOSI

“I just don’t think it’s the silver bullet they say it will be,” Guy Cecil, the chairman of Priorities USA, the liberal PAC that went all-in on Hillary Clinton’s presidency campaign, told The Journal.

Cecil notes that Pelosi may be a weapon for the GOP only in districts where Republicans have historically performed well, such as in Georgia last year. In districts swept by Clinton in 2016, Republicans may not be so lucky.

“If it wasn’t Nancy Pelosi, then it’d be Chuck Schumer, the ‘New York liberal,’” Cecil said. “It’s not really a new playbook.”

At the same time, Democrats may use the polarizing presidency of Donald Trump, whose election in 2016 energized the Democratic base that could potentially show up in troves at the ballot boxes during the midterm elections in November.

Lukas Mikelionis is a reporter for FoxNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @LukasMikelionis.



Source link

Politics

Florida asks Supreme Court to let cruise ships sail again

Published

on

WASHINGTON — Florida urged the Supreme Court on Friday to block federal Covid restrictions that have vastly cut back the number of cruise ships operating from the state’s ports.

In an emergency appeal, the state said restrictions imposed by the Centers for Disease Control have made it very difficult for the industry to get going again, after it was shut down for nearly 16 months.

Federal rules now allow ships to board passengers if cruise lines meet such requirements as setting up Covid testing labs, running test voyages, maintaining social distancing, and establishing onshore housing for quarantining passengers.

The federal government said the rules were necessary with the United States in the midst of a once-in-a-lifetime pandemic that included several deadly outbreaks clustered on cruise ships. “These experiences demonstrated that cruise ships are uniquely suited to spread COVID-19, likely due to their close quarters for passengers and crew for prolonged periods.”

Now is not the time to put the rules on hold, the Justice Department argued, as the government works with the industry to get it going again — noting that the cruise industry did not join Florida’s lawsuit.

But the rules allow only a fraction of the normal number of ships to sail, the state said.

“The CDC’s order is manifestly beyond its authority,” Florida said. The federal law giving the CDC power to enact traditional quarantine measures “does not permit the agency to remake the entire cruise ship industry.”

The state said the restrictions have cost Florida tens of millions of dollars in lost tax and port revenue and required it to meet the additional expensive of paying unemployment benefits to cruise industry employees.

In June a federal court agreed with the state and blocked the CDC restrictions. U.S. District Court Judge Steven Merryday of Tampa, Florida, said the effort to impose the rules was “breathtaking, unprecedented, and acutely and singularly authoritarian.” He said he wondered whether the CDC would have argued that it could ban intercourse to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted diseases.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit, based in Atlanta, put Merryday’s order on hold. Florida’s emergency motion asked the Supreme Court to lift that hold and allow the judge’s ruling to take effect.



Source link

Continue Reading

Politics

'This won't end well' Meghan and Harry warned of US backlash as Sussexes go against Queen

Published

on

PRINCE Harry and Meghan Markle cannot hope to win in a popularity contest against the Queen, even among Americans, a former MP who is now based in the US has said.

Source link

Continue Reading

Politics

Tom Barrack, former Trump inaugural chair, released on $250 million bond

Published

on

Former Trump inaugural committee chair Tom Barrack on Friday was released from federal lockup in California on a $250 million bond ahead of his scheduled arraignment in New York on charges he acted as an agent of the United Arab Emirates and obstructed justice.

As part of the terms of his release, Barrack, 74, is subject to electronic monitoring and will have to foot the bill for his GPS ankle bracelet, Judge Patricia Donahue ordered, signing off on an agreement that had been worked out between the government and Barrack’s attorneys.

Barrack, a private equity investor and founder of the investment firm Colony Capital, also had to surrender his passports and is barred from transferring funds overseas, the judge said. He cannot trade any securities without written permission from federal prosecutors and is not allowed to transfer more than $50,000 except for attorneys fees.

He’s scheduled to be arraigned in federal court in Brooklyn, New York on Monday. His spokesman said earlier this week that Barrack “is not guilty and will be pleading not guilty.”

A longtime friend of former President Donald Trump, Barrack had been behind bars since his arrest Tuesday on charges that he and two co-defendants were “acting and conspiring to act as agents” of the UAE between April 2016 and April 2018, but without registering as foreign agents.

Prosecutors said Barrack and the others acted “to advance the interests of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in the United States at the direction of senior UAE officials by influencing the foreign policy positions of the campaign of a candidate in the 2016 U.S. presidential election and, subsequently, the foreign policy positions of the U.S. government in the incoming administration.”

Barrack was also charged with obstruction of justice and making multiple false statements to federal law enforcement agents.



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending