Connect with us

World

Kids fear missing out, but aren’t that hooked on their cellphones: Expert

Published

on

How many times a day do most people check their phones? Dozens, hundreds? And what about their kids?

A study conducted by Common Sense Media found that 50 percent of teens “feel addicted” to mobile devices, and 59 percent of their parents agree. It’s a growing concern that has even prompted two of Apple’s major investors, CalSTERS and Jana Partners, to urge the tech giant to take action.

Ana Homayoun, author of “Social Media Wellness,” said it’s not so much that the phone is addictive, it’s really the applications on the phone and how it’s being used.

“When we think about social media, so much of it is created on this feedback loop of notifications. They want to promote engagement,” Homayoun told CNBC’s “On the Money” in an interview.

She added, “They create this system where you always want to be online. And it can create this fear of missing out if we’re not online. This happens for adults as well as kids.”

It raises the question of what age is the right time for a child to receive a smartphone. According to a study conducted by Pew Research, 73 percent of teens age 13-17 have smartphones, including 68 percent of 13-14 years old.

Homayoun said the right age really varies, depending on the kid and the family situation. However, she said it’s best to introduce phones incrementally.

“More parents are giving their kids their old smartphone as a hand me down, and I recommend incremental usage,” she told CNBC. “Give them a flip phone first, and only use it during certain times, so that you’re giving and establishing good habits.”

Source link

World

Navalny’s death would hurt Russia’s standing

Published

on

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks during a media conference during a NATO summit in Brussels, Monday, June 14, 2021.

Olivier Hoslet | AP

WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden issued a warning to Russian President Vladimir Putin ahead of their Wednesday summit, that the death of jailed Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny would hurt Russia’s relationships with the rest of the world.

“Navalny’s death would be another indication that Russia has little or no intention of abiding by basic fundamental human rights,” Biden said at a press conference Monday following the NATO summit.

“It would be a tragedy. It would do nothing but hurt his relationships with the rest of the world, in my view, and with me,” he said.

Concern over Navalny’s imprisonment and worsening health condition is the latest drumbeat in the already tense relations between Moscow and the West.

As Biden prepares to meet one on one with Putin, the White House insists that the Geneva summit does not amount to a reward for Putin, placing him on equal par with the United States.

Instead, the meeting will be a business-like review of the bilateral relationship. Biden will raise several pressing concerns, but will also seek areas where Russia and the United States can work together.

Biden has pressured Putin to release Navalny before. Shortly after he was sworn in, Biden spoke to Putin by phone, and said he told his counterpart that Navalny’s imprisonment was “of deep concern” to the United States.

“Mr. Navalny, like all Russian citizens, is entitled to his rights under the Russian constitution,” Biden said in a speech to U.S. diplomats. “He’s been targeted — targeted for exposing corruption.  He should be released immediately and without condition.”

In January, Navalny flew to Russia from Berlin, Germany where he had spent nearly half a year recovering after having been poisoned last summer. He was arrested at passport control as soon as he landed.

A month later, a Russian court sentenced Navalny to more than two years in jail for parole violations, charges he said were politically motivated.

The German government said that Navalny was poisoned by a chemical nerve agent in August of 2020, and that toxicology reports provided “unequivocal evidence” of the poison.

The nerve agent was in the family of Novichok, which was developed decades ago by the Soviet Union. Toxicology tests conducted in France and Sweden came to the same conclusion.

The Kremlin has repeatedly denied playing a role in Navalny’s poisoning.

In March, the Biden administration slapped sanctions on seven members of the Russian government for the alleged poisoning of Navalny.

Washington also imposed sanctions on 14 entities involved in the chemical and biological industrial base in Russia.

At the time, Secretary of State Antony Blinken wrote in a statement that the sanctions would “send a clear signal” to Russia that use of chemical weapons and human rights abuses carry hefty consequences.

Source link

Continue Reading

World

NATO members unite to face evolving threats from Russia and China

Published

on

U.S. President Joe Biden attends a meeting with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg during a NATO summit, at the Alliance’s headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, June 14, 2021.

Stephanie Lecocq | Reuters

WASHINGTON  —  NATO members vowed to address a range of traditional and evolving security challenges, including several posed by China, in a joint statement released Monday at the close of the summit.

“China’s growing influence and international policies can present challenges that we need to address together as an Alliance,” the statement, known as a communique, said. “We will engage China with a view to defending the security interests of the Alliance.”

The references to China represent a victory for President Joe Biden, who was attending his first NATO summit as president.

Biden arrived at the summit intent upon rallying NATO’s 30 member-strong alliance behind a security policy that confronts both new threats, like cyberwarfare and China, as well as traditional threats, like Russia’s military incursions into Eastern Europe.

But Beijing’s ambitious military buildup also received mention in the communique.

“China is rapidly expanding its nuclear arsenal with more warheads and a larger number of sophisticated delivery systems to establish a nuclear triad,” the communique said. 

Biden has said his administration will stand “shoulder to shoulder” with America’s closest allies, breaking sharply from his predecessor’s “America First” policy.

President Donald Trump attacked NATO on regular basis, questioning both the relevancy and the effectiveness of the decades-old alliance.

By contrast, Biden is outspoken in his belief that NATO is a cornerstone of global stability and a crucial player in confronting these evolving threats.

Yet NATO’s pivot to China, as opposed to a laser focus on Russia, is not necessarily a welcome change for everyone.

Some of NATO’s smallest members, many located in Eastern Europe, believe that deterrence against Russian aggression should be the chief concern of NATO’s security efforts.

Biden met with leaders of several Balkan nations on Monday morning, as well as with Poland’s president, Andrzej Duda. The U.S. military maintains a significant presence in Poland that is widely viewed as a major deterrent to Russia.

In response to the threat of hybrid warfare that Russia poses, NATO member states opened the door to potentially invoking Article 5, the mutual defense agreement, in cases of destabilizing disinformation attacks against “political institutions” and “public opinion.”

To date, Article 5 has only been invoked once — in defense of the United States in the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

“We are enhancing our situational awareness and expanding the tools at our disposal to counter hybrid threats, including disinformation campaigns, by developing comprehensive preventive and response options,” the communique states.

Russia’s disinformation campaigns have hit Europe hard, notably ahead of the 2016 Brexit referendum, during the 2017 protests in Catalonia, and before the 2019 European Parliament elections.

On Tuesday, Biden will travel to Geneva for a summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin. The president is expected to raise many of the topics addressed in the NATO communique.

Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, and Chinese President Xi Jinping, right, attend the Tsinghua Universitys ceremony, at Friendship Palace on April 26, 2019 in Beijing, China.

Kenzaburo Fukuhara | Getty Images

A broader power struggle

Throughout his visit to Europe, Biden has framed the competition between Western democracies and both Russia and China as more than simply an economic or a military competition.

To the president, it is a battle over which system of governance will emerge as the world’s great power, Chinese-style authoritarianism or Western democracy and capitalism.

Both Moscow and Beijing regularly ignore the international rules and norms that govern trade, security, defense, labor and human rights. This constitutes a serious threat to NATO and to developing countries around the world.

In some ways, Biden’s approach to China is not that different from Trump’s approach.

Tensions between Beijing and Washington soared under the Trump administration, fueled by a trade war and barriers preventing Chinese technology companies from doing business in the United States.

But Biden has said his approach to China would differ from his predecessor’s in that he would work more closely with allies in order to mount pushback against Beijing.

“We will confront China’s economic abuses,” Biden said in a recent speech. “But we’re also ready to work with Beijing when it’s in America’s interest to do so. We’ll compete from a position of strength by building back better at home and working with our allies and partners.”

Biden’s message has been warmly welcomed by NATO member leaders, following four years under Trump during which the United States was a thorn in the side of the alliance.

Trump repeatedly attacked NATO during his presidency, accusing it of being irrelevant and impotent. Trump even threatened to pull the United States out of the alliance.

Source link

Continue Reading

World

Biden holds press conference at NATO summit

Published

on

[The stream is slated to start at 12:45 p.m. ET. Please refresh the page if you do not see a player above at that time.]

President Joe Biden is set to hold a press conference at NATO headquarters in Belgium during his first in-person summit with the military alliance since becoming commander in chief.

Biden’s presser, set for 6:50 p.m. Brussels time, follows a series of meetings with heads of member nations, including Turkish President Recep Erdogan and the leaders of the Baltic states, according to the White House.

On Wednesday, Biden is scheduled to hold a bilateral meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Geneva, Switzerland.

The jam-packed European tour, Biden’s first trip overseas as president, also included meetings with the wealthy Group of Seven nations, who gathered in the U.K. over the weekend.

The president made explicit his intention to repair America’s relationships with key European allies, which in his view were frayed by his predecessor, former President Donald Trump.

“The lack of participation in the past and full engagement was noticed significantly, not only by the leaders of those countries but by the people in the G-7 countries,” Biden said Sunday at a press conference in Cornwall. 

“America is back in the business of leading the world alongside nations who share our most deeply held values,” he said.

Earlier Monday, Biden also touched base with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, participated in a summit with the group of 30 European and North American states, and took a “family photo” with the other leaders, the White House schedule said.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube. 

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending