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Labour anti-Semitism could have '1930's outcome' warns Lord Triesman

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Bulgarian PM breaks cover to reveal EU paying 60% more for future purchases of Pfizer

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THE European Union is facing a huge price hike for its future purchases of the Pfizer coronavirus vaccine, it has emerged.

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Biden to push sweeping jobs plan in meeting with bipartisan group of lawmakers

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WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden will seek to build bipartisan support for his sweeping $2 trillion American Jobs Plan when he is scheduled to meet Monday at the White House with a bipartisan group of lawmakers.

Biden is already facing opposition from some moderates in his party over his proposal to pay for the bill by raising corporate taxes. Republicans have rejected the president’s attempt at establishing a broad definition of infrastructure to include items such as care for the elderly.

The White House has said that they hope to pass a bill by the end of the summer, leaving a narrow timeline for lawmakers to come to an agreement.

Republican Sens. Deb Fischer of Nebraska and Roger Wicker of Mississippi are expected to attend Monday’s meeting, according to the White House, as well as Democratic Sens. Alex Padilla of California and Maria Cantwell of Washington. Reps. Garret Graves, R-La., Don Payne, D-N.J., David Price, D-N.C., and Don Young, R-Alaska, will also be at the meeting, the White House said.

Monday’s meeting is an early test to whether Biden can score bipartisan legislative victories in a bitterly divided Congress.

Biden has said that his preference is to pass the bill, which he is calling the “American Jobs Plan,” with bipartisan support and is open to compromise on provisions like the corporate tax rate. But it is unclear just how much he is willing to negotiate on other points to get Republicans to agree.

While the Republican lawmakers invited to Monday’s meeting are members of relevant committees, such as Commerce, Science, and Transportation, the group is not known for their bipartisanship. Key senators such as Joe Manchin, D-W. Va., a critical moderate swing vote, and Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, who has expressed some willingness to work with the White House, were notably not on the list of invitees.

The White House has said that Biden plans to hold many meetings with lawmakers in the coming weeks, leaving more opportunities for the president to hear directly from moderates of both parties.

Administration officials have also talking directly to lawmakers and staff on Capitol Hill. Last week Brian Deese, the head of the National Economic Council, and Cabinet officials held a briefing for all senators on the plan. House Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., has also been soliciting transportation project priorities from members in an effort to gain support for the legislation.

Still, Biden faces an uphill battle to win over Republicans.

Ahead of Monday’s meeting, the Senate Republican Conference sent around a memo criticizing Biden’s proposal as a “partisan plan to kill jobs and create slush funds on the taxpayer dime” and argued that Americans did not consider initiatives like efforts to combat climate change and wealth inequality as infrastructure.

“The bill would need to be fundamentally redone,” Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming, the No. 3 House Republican, said Sunday on CBS’s “Face the Nation.” “So much of it is unnecessary.”

Garrett Haake and Leigh Ann Caldwell contributed.

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Germany's dominance of EU empire tipped to backfire – warning as Eurosceptic surge looms

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GERMANY’s political instability could risk the collapse of the European Union as we know it and a surge of Eurosceptic leaders across the bloc, an expert has warned.

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