Connect with us

Latest News

Heather Locklear arrested for domestic violence, attacking a police officer, reports say

Published

on

Heather Locklear was reportedly arrested for felony domestic violence and attacking a police officer.

TMZ reports that police responded to a call about domestic violence at Locklear’s Thousand Oaks, Calif., residence on Sunday night.

When cops attempted to arrest the 56-year-old, she reportedly became violent and attacked a police officer.

According to Variety, Locklear’s full charges are one count domestic violence, a felony and three counts of battery on emergency personnel.

The Venture County Sheriff’s Office did not return Fox News’ request for comment.

The former “Melrose Place” star has struggled with substance abuse in the past and most recently entered rehab last year. She was also arrested in 2010 for a hit and run

A rep for Locklear did not immediately return Fox News’ request for comment.

You can find Sasha Savitsky on Twitter @SashaFB.



Source link

Latest News

Joe Biden takes military action for first time as president – US launches airstrikes on Syria | US News

Published

on

The US has launched airstrikes on eastern Syria – the first military action undertaken since Joe Biden became president.

The Thursday evening strikes were in retaliation for a rocket attack in Iraq on 15 February that killed a civilian contractor and wounded coalition troops, including Americans.

The targets were at a control point on the border with Iraq and the Pentagon said “multiple facilities” used by Iranian-backed militant groups were “destroyed”.

Pentagon spokesman John Kirby speaks during a media briefing at the Pentagon, Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Image:
Pentagon spokesman John Kirby said the facilities were destroyed. Pic: AP

The Pentagon’s chief spokesperson John Kirby said: “This proportionate military response was conducted together with diplomatic measures, including consultation with coalition partners.

“The operation sends an unambiguous message: President Biden will act to protect American and coalition personnel.

“At the same time, we have acted in a deliberate manner that aims to deescalate the overall situation in eastern Syria and Iraq.”

There were no details given on any casualties.

Reuters quoted an anonymous US official as saying the strikes were intended to send a signal that while the US wanted to punish the militias, it did not want the situation to spiral into a bigger conflict.

The official also said that Mr Biden was given a range of options and one of the most limited responses was chosen.

The 15 February attack on a US military base housed at Erbil International Airport is being investigated by Iraq, Mr Kirby said, adding: “Right now, we’re not able to give you a certain attribution as to who was behind these attacks, what groups, and I’m not going to get into the tactical details of every bit of weaponry used here.”

“Let’s let the investigations complete and conclude, and then when we have more to say, we will.”

A Shia group, Saraya Awliya al Dam (Arabic for Guardians of Blood Brigade) said it was behind that attack, but Iran denied any links to it.

Donald Trump. Pic: AP
Image:
Donald Trump pulled the US out of the nuclear deal in 2018. Pic: AP

It comes as the US tries to get Iran back into negotiations with a view to both countries re-entering the Iran nuclear deal.

The 2015 deal between Iran and six major powers limited Iran’s uranium enrichment activity to make it harder for Tehran to develop nuclear arms – an ambition Iran has long denied having – in return for the easing of sanctions.

But former US president Donald Trump abandoned the deal in 2018, saying it was one-sided in Iran’s favour, and reimposed sanctions that have continued to cripple Iran’s economy.

Under Mr Trump, tensions with Iran soared, reaching a high point after a US-directed drone strike killed top Iranian general Qassem Soleimani.

Source link

Continue Reading

Latest News

COVID-19 rips through South African townships leaving a generation facing a ‘world without adults’ | World News

Published

on

There is a pink house in the township of Zwide that sounds much like any other family home at six or seven in the morning.

Inside, we watched three boys and one girl race to get ready for school and there were lots of things to brush, tie and polish before the school bell rang.

But there was someone missing in this house in the South African city of Port Elizabeth.

The children’s mother, Bela, has died of COVID-19 – and their father has left the scene.

Abuqua, who is 16, his sister Amyoli, 11, and nine-year-old twins Oyi and Ayi are orphans now – and they have been left in the care of their frustrated 23-year-old cousin.

Anna-Lisa Sondlo has been left to look after the kids
Image:
Anna-Lisa Sondlo has been left to look after the kids

“Would you choose to be doing this, do you want to be doing this?” I asked Anna-Lisa Sondlo.

“No, I don’t want to.”

“Why?” I asked.

“Why would I want to be doing something like this?”

Without their mother, who worked as an assistant teacher, the children now find themselves in an uncomfortable situation.

The Tyatyas are living under extraordinary strain after their mum died
Image:
The Tyatyas are living under extraordinary strain after their mum died

The twins have no one to help them with their homework.

“We teach ourselves – but our mother used to teach us,” says Oyi Tyatya.

And without their mother’s income, the kids do not always have enough to eat. Amyoli told me that she drinks water to stop the feeling of hunger.

Community leaders in this province, the Eastern Cape, told us that thousands of children have lost their parents or primary care-givers to the virus and it has put families like the Tyatyas under extraordinary strain.

The children’s uncle, Khaya Tyatya, does what he can but he works as a pastor and his salary does not go very far.

“You know how much pastors get paid? It’s not very much and we have not been able to hold services lately.”

Reverend Tyatya is under considerable strain, both financially and emotionally. Three of his sisters – including Bela – have died from COVID-19 and the virus also took the life of his wife, Queenie.

The graveyard has grown dramatically since last July
Image:
This graveyard has grown dramatically since last July

They were buried at a windswept cemetery in Port Elizabeth and the pastor wanted to show us Bela’s plot, but it took him several hours to find it. The graveyard has grown dramatically since his loved ones were interred last July.

I asked the church leader if he remembered how he felt.

“I could not understand why this is happening to me alone, what is it that I have done to deserve this? But there are questions that cannot be answered on this side of the world, hence I say, I want to ask Jesus in heaven, one-on-one, why was this allowed happen to us?”

For residents like Reverend Tyatya, COVID-19 has been shocking and traumatic.

More people have died from the virus in the Eastern Cape than anywhere else in the country and a highly contagious strain, known by scientists as 501Y.V2 and others as the South African variant, was first discovered by health workers in and around Port Elizabeth.

Soup kitchens for children are now required in Port Elizabeth
Image:
Soup kitchens for children are now required in Port Elizabeth

But young people will be forced to live with the legacy of this disease.

In a world without adults, soup kitchens for children are now required and we found volunteers at one, handing out noodles and watermelon in a township in Port Elizabeth.

The youngsters, both orphans and members of vulnerable families, looked grateful but the organisers told us they were sad because this is all they can do to help them.

Source link

Continue Reading

Latest News

COVID-19: EU leaders divided over vaccine passports to allow European travel this summer | World News

Published

on

European Union leaders are divided over developing vaccine passports to open the continent up to tourism this summer.

Some countries want an EU-wide approach instead of individual nations having their own certificates, while others are concerned such documentation could result in discrimination.

Leaders of the EU’s 27 countries met online on Thursday to start a two-day summit to discuss the pandemic, and while they agreed to work on vaccine certificates, they could not come up with a unified plan.

Angela Merkel said more knowledge about transmission of the virus by vaccinated people was needed
Image:
Angela Merkel said more knowledge about transmission of the virus by vaccinated people was needed

Greece, where tourism contributes to 25% of its GDP, has been leading the call for an EU-wide vaccine certificate to ensure it can benefit from summer tourism.

Athens is in talks with Britain about using a digital “Green Pass”, which it has already agreed with Israel, that issues certificates for people who have had both of their coronavirus jabs.

Its tourism minister said on Thursday that even unvaccinated Britons could visit the country, so long as they have tested negative for COVID-19 beforehand.

Spain, Austria and Bulgaria also support the EU-wide certificate, but Vienna said it would implement its own if the EU cannot agree on anything by spring – and wants to include people who have immunity through having COVID-19 and those who have tested negative.

But German Chancellor Angela Merkel doubted whether vaccine certificates of any kind could work.

“First, it must actually be clearly resolved that vaccinated people are no longer infectious,” she told German newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung.

“As long as the number of those who have been vaccinated is still so much smaller than the number who are waiting for vaccination, the state should not treat the two groups differently.”

However, she provided some hope to countries pushing for certificates and said technical work on them should be completed by the summer.

French President Emmanuel Macron said he was concerned vaccine certificates would discriminate
Image:
French President Emmanuel Macron said he was concerned vaccine certificates would discriminate

Some countries, though, including France and Belgium, are concerned vaccine certificates would discriminate against those who have not been immunised.

French President Emmanuel Macron said a balance must be found and there are still ethical questions to be resolved, adding that certificates would be unfair for young people who are at the back of the vaccine queue.

France is also beefing up COVID-19 measures on its border with Germany in the Moselle area, with cross-border workers now having to present negative PCR tests to get through.

Romanian President Klaus Iohannis also said vaccine certificates would split Europeans who have and have not had the vaccine.

Other EU countries are developing their own ways of showing people have had the vaccine, with Denmark planning to launch a digital passport to document a traveller’s vaccination status, that it said will be compatible with any future EU-wide scheme.

Sweden and Finland are also planning a similar digital passport.

SANTORINI, GREECE - AUGUST 12: (EDITORS NOTE: Image processed using digital filters) A general view of the sunset in the picturesque village of Oia (Ia) on Santorini Island on August 12, 2017 in Mykonos, Greece. (Photo by Claudio Lavenia/Getty Images)
Image:
Greece, where 25% of GDP is reliant on tourism, is pushing for an EU-wide vaccine certificate

Hungary said from 1 March it will issue a physical vaccination certificate for any citizens who have been inoculated or have immunity from recovering from COVID-19.

The UK is reviewing the use of certificates to help reopen the economy and will consider a travel certificate once more is known about the efficacy of vaccines against variants, though ministers have acknowledged the ethical concerns.

Westminster is working with the World Health Organisation and other countries on an international travel framework.

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending