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Billboards inspired by Oscar contender challenge Rubio on Florida shooting and gun reforms

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In an attempt to spread awareness about Wednesday’s school shooting in Florida and encourage gun reform, an activist group parked three trucks with political billboards outside Sen. Marco Rubio’s office on Friday. The signs were inspired by those featured in the Oscar-nominated film “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.”

The mobile billboards were sponsored by the activist group Avaaz, The Miami Herald reported.

“Slaughtered in school,” the first sign read. “And still no gun control?” read the second. And the third: “How come, Marco Rubio?”

The protest comes after 17 people were gunned down in a mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida.

Speaking on the Senate floor Thursday, Rubio argued that stricter gun control would not have prevented the shooting because a shooter would “find a way to get the gun to do it.”

The billboards in the movie, bearing similar language, were placed by a mother (Frances McDormand) taking law enforcement to task for failing to catch her daughter’s killer.

Oscar Soria, a senior campaigner for Avaaz, told Fox News that the group will again be driving the billboards throughout Miami on Monday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. ET.

A similar billboard protest, again taking a cue from the critically acclaimed movie, took place in London on Thursday. This time, the subject was victims of a deadly high-rise fire that killed 71 people in June.

According to CNN, the signs were emblazoned with the words  “71 dead,” “And still no arrests?” and “How come?” The signs were mounted on vans and driven around the streets of the British capital, according to the CNN report.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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John McDonnell claims Rishi Sunak has ‘stolen’ his ‘rhetoric' after Covid recovery Budget

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FORMER shadow chancellor John McDonnell has accused Rishi Sunak of “stealing my rhetoric” as he attacked his pandemic recovery Budget.

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EU news: European Central Bank wants more control amid soaring tensions with London

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EUROZONE chiefs are demanding more control over financial regulation if an EU plot to take lucrative trade from the City of London is successful.

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Senate begins debate on Covid relief bill after limiting $1,400 checks, adding new spending

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WASHINGTON — The Democratic-controlled Senate voted Thursday to begin debate on President Joe Biden’s $1.9 trillion Covid-19 relief package in a party-line vote that sets the stage for a contentious process with Republicans.

The procedural motion passed by a vote of 51-50, with Vice President Kamala Harris breaking the tie. It came after Senate Democrats made some changes to the House-passed version, including new limits to eligibility for the $1,400 cash payments.

“It is time to tell the American people that help is on the way,” Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said before the vote.

The Senate could pass the bill as early as this weekend, after debate and votes on amendments. The process was delayed after Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., forced the entire 628-page bill to be read on the Senate floor on Thursday afternoon. Once passed, the House will need to vote again on the bill before it can be sent to the president.

The legislation is the product of negotiations between the Senate Democrats and Biden. The bill does not need any Republican votes to pass because Democrats are using a special budget process to bypass the filibuster.

Other changes include boosting the health care subsidies under COBRA for jobless people from 85 percent to 100 percent, and making all Covid-19 student loan relief tax-free, said a Senate Democratic aide. There’s also another $200 million for Amtrak, $510 million for homeless services under FEMA and $175 million to the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

The Senate bill also slaps new “guardrails” on the $350 billion for state and local relief, the Democratic aide said. That provision is a leading target of Republican opposition.

The legislation also provides $8.5 billion in relief for rural health care providers. Sen. Susan Collins, Republican of Maine, has pushed for extra funding in that area.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., blasted the Democratic bill as a “partisan spending spree” shortly before Thursday’s procedural vote.

Before a final vote can be taken, there will be a period of unlimited amendments, known as a vote-a-rama. Republicans say they are planning to try to put Democrats on the spot with myriad amendments, forcing them to defend politically contentious provisions in the bill. That will likely include motions to “strike” certain policies.



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